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  • May 25, 2016
  • 12:05 PM
  • 609 views

A New Chromosome Y Risk for Alzheimers

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

There are many risk factors for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) including history of head trauma and family history of AD.The strongest risk factor is advanced age. Yearly risk for AD is about 1% per year in 70 year old populations jumping to around 7% in 90 year old groups.Now a recent study is shedding some light on a new risk for AD in men. This risk appears to be related to a chromosome Y phenomenon known to be associated with aging.Elderly men show a tendency to lose the Y chromosome from a small ........ Read more »

Dumanski JP et al. (2016) Mosiac loss of chromosome Y in blood is associated with Alzheimer's disease. American Journal of Human Genetics. info:/10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.05.014

  • May 23, 2016
  • 05:30 AM
  • 447 views

Females at Increased Risk of Protracted Concussion Symptoms

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Clinical factors that related with persistent postconcussion symptoms were sex, greater worsening symptoms from day of concussion to first concussion evaluation, continued activity participation, loss of consciousness, anterograde amnesia, and premorbid headaches, emotional symptoms on the day of concussion, and greater symptoms the day of the clinical examination. ... Read more »

  • May 21, 2016
  • 11:21 AM
  • 709 views

Quick Aspirin Use Reduces Stroke Risk in TIA

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

A free full-text commentary in the Lancet summarizes recent evidence of the benefit of aspirin in stroke prevention.This commentary focused on what is called secondary prevention. Secondary prevention is defined as prevention following events related to the disease in question.So secondary prevention in stroke would be reduction in stroke risk in those who have had a stroke or pre-stroke syndromes such as transient ischemic attacks (TIA).The key take-home message from the commentary by Graeme Ha........ Read more »

  • May 20, 2016
  • 05:30 AM
  • 575 views

Athletes With High Baseline Concussion Symptom Scores May Need Special Considerations

by Joshua Baracks in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletes who report numerous concussion symptoms during baseline testing may experience greater neurocognitive impairment after a concussion than athletes who do not report baseline symptoms.... Read more »

Custer A, Sufrinko A, Elbin RJ, Covassin T, Collins M, & Kontos A. (2016) High Baseline Postconcussion Symptom Scores and Concussion Outcomes in Athletes. Journal of athletic training, 51(2), 136-41. PMID: 26885702  

  • May 11, 2016
  • 01:34 PM
  • 451 views

Dietary Seafood and Cognitive Decline

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Seafood intake has been linked to a variety of improvements in health. Additionally, there is some evidence linking seafood intake with slower cognitive decline in aging populations.A recent study adds to this age-related cognitive benefit of seafood intake.A collaborative group of researchers from Rush University Medical Center and the Wageningen University in the Netherlands conducted a prospective study.This study followed 915 subjects with a mean age of 81.4 years over a five year period. Su........ Read more »

  • May 10, 2016
  • 01:54 PM
  • 445 views

Smartphones and Sleep Data: Data Mining

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Smartphones contribute a treasure trove of data that is likely to expand our knowledge of a variety of human behaviors.An example of this is a recent study published in Science Advances by a research team from the University of Michigan.The University of Michigan team developed a smartphone app called ENTRAIN and then used the app to collect sleep data on subjects from around the world.They came up with some very interesting findings including the following:The time of going to sleep appears mor........ Read more »

  • May 9, 2016
  • 05:30 AM
  • 603 views

Strongest Indicator of Implementing a Return-to-Learn Protocol was Communication

by Jane McDevitt, PhD in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Overall 84% of athletic trainers recommended a gradual return to learn, but only 44% of athletic trainers report having a return-to-learn policy.... Read more »

  • May 3, 2016
  • 01:05 PM
  • 531 views

Depression Symptoms and Alzheimer's Risk

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

An important study was published today in Lancet Psychiatry. This study examined the role of depression symptoms in risk for later development of dementia including Alzheimer's disease.Previous work on this topic has relied on cross-sectional risk factor design. However, the study published today used a prospective longitudinal design for elderly individuals participating the Rotterdam study.Depressive symptoms were measured over time and compared to latter risk for development of dementia......... Read more »

  • May 3, 2016
  • 12:36 PM
  • 440 views

Delirium and Aortic Valve Surgery Outcome

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Delirium is an acute confusional state that is common in elderly hospitalized patients.I think of it light a sign of acute brain failure requiring aggressive attentional for detection and treatment of any reversible underlying causes.Delirium in elderly hospitalized patients is a marker for poor outcome in a variety of medical and surgical subjects.A recent study published by a Norwegian team found effects on outcome for delirium following surgical aortic valve replacement. The key findings from........ Read more »

Eide LS, Ranhoff AH, Fridlund B, Haaverstad R, Hufthammer KO, Kuiper KK, Nordrehaug JE, Norekvål TM, & Delirium in Octogenarians Undergoing Cardiac Surgery or Intervention-CARDELIR Investigators. (2016) Delirium as a Predictor of Physical and Cognitive Function in Individuals Aged 80 and Older After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. PMID: 27106745  

  • May 2, 2016
  • 05:30 AM
  • 593 views

If the Helmet Don’t Fit, You May Have to Sit (Out Longer with a Concussion)

by Stephen Stache in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

An athlete with a poorly fit helmet that sustains a concussion may have an increased risk of more severe symptoms and prolonged recovery.... Read more »

  • May 1, 2016
  • 04:01 AM
  • 757 views

The Truth About Cognitive Impairment in Retired NFL Players

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

NINETY-TWO percent of retired National Football League players have decreased cognitive function, according to a new study:“In the NFL group, baseline neuropsychological assessments showed 92% of players had decreased general cognitive proficiency, 86% had decreased information processing speed, 83% had memory loss, 83% had attentional deficits, and 85% had executive function impairment.”The Truth?The study reported on a self-selected sample of 161 current and retired NFL players recruite........ Read more »

Daniel G. Amen, Kristen Willeumier, Bennet Omalu, Andrew Newberg, Cauligi Raghavendra, & Cyrus A. Raji. (2016) Perfusion Neuroimaging Abnormalities Alone Distinguish National Football League Players from a Healthy Population. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. info:/10.3233/JAD-160207

  • March 28, 2016
  • 05:30 AM
  • 629 views

9-Point Survey to Determine Risk of Persistent Postconcusison Symptoms in Pediatric Population

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A novel clinical risk score developed for the acutely concussed pediatric population has a modest ability to discriminate between those at low, medium, or high risk for persistent postconcussion symptoms at 28 days.... Read more »

Zemek R, Barrowman N, Freedman SB, Gravel J, Gagnon I, McGahern C, Aglipay M, Sangha G, Boutis K, Beer D.... (2016) Clinical Risk Score for Persistent Postconcussion Symptoms Among Children With Acute Concussion in the ED. JAMA, 315(10), 1014-25. PMID: 26954410  

  • March 22, 2016
  • 04:40 PM
  • 750 views

Parsley, prohibition, and machine gun oil: A sorrowful history of tricresyl phosphate poisoning

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Some poisons are better known than others.Arsenic, for example, is famous for its participation in many a murder and suicide from the Middle Ages through to the mid-19th century (after which it became easier to detect and more difficult to acquire). Even to this day, the malicious metalloid remains in the public eye as a contaminant of groundwater in parts of South Asia and of soil in old orchards.A decidedly more obscure poison is a gooey industrial derivative of coal tar (leftovers from conver........ Read more »

  • March 20, 2016
  • 10:39 AM
  • 918 views

Neuropsychiatric Outcomes Of Traumatic Brain Injury

by Vivek Misra in Uberbrain Research Frontier

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), also known as intracranial injury, is a substantial head injury that results in damage to the brain. This damage can cause a wide spectrum of possible health outcomes. Factors that are likely to influence neuropsychiatric outcome in TBI can be classified as pre-injury, injury and post-injury factors. Injury-related factors include a) the type of physical injury
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The post Neuropsychiatric Outcomes Of Traumatic Brain Injury appeared first on UBRF: UberBrain R........ Read more »

  • March 9, 2016
  • 11:55 AM
  • 1,084 views

Look Who's Talking

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Would you believe that the anatomy of your ribs is why you can sing and an ape can’t, or that one of the same reasons you can speak is the same reason you are likely to choke to death on a hotdog? Biology is weird, and you can tell it I said so.... Read more »

  • March 7, 2016
  • 07:26 AM
  • 882 views

Writing-Induced Fugue State

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Who is this, wandering around the crowded street, afraid of everything, trusting no one? “There must be something wrong, somewhere.”But maybe I’m safer since I look disheveled. Who are these people? Where is this place?Did I write that? When did that happen? I don’t remember. I can’t stop writing. I can’t stop walking, either, which is a problem because it’s hard to write and walk at the same time.In the early 1940s, Austrian Psychiatrist Dr. Erwin Stengel wrote a pair of papers........ Read more »

  • February 24, 2016
  • 05:30 AM
  • 606 views

“Playing Up” May Be Putting Young Athletes on the Bench For Longer Periods Following Concussion

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Among adolescent ice hockey players, early pubertal stage is associated with longer concussion recovery in males. Young players should be discouraged from “playing-up.”... Read more »

  • February 15, 2016
  • 05:30 AM
  • 641 views

Concussed Athletes Face Tough Odds Against Lower Extremity Injuries After Return to Play

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletes with a recent concussion are ~2.5 times more likely to sustain a lower extremity injury within 90 days after return to play compared with athletes without a concussion.... Read more »

  • February 13, 2016
  • 07:18 PM
  • 807 views

Virus factories and hijacked proteins: How could Zika cause microcephaly?

by Megan Cartwright in Science-Based Writing

There’s something missing from all the coverage of Zika virus, the mosquito-spread flavivirus that’s spread across 26 countries in the Americas since May 2015. While Zika usually doesn’t cause symptoms in adults, the outbreak coincided with a 20- to 40-fold … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 1, 2016
  • 05:30 AM
  • 591 views

Should We Check the Checking Age in Youth Ice Hockey?

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Concussion rates in youth ice hockey are nearly 3 times higher during games compared to practice, and 12 to 14 year olds have higher incidence rates compared to 15 to 18 year olds.... Read more »

Kontos, A., Elbin, R., Sufrinko, A., Dakan, S., Bookwalter, K., Price, A., Meehan, W., & Collins, M. (2016) Incidence of Concussion in Youth Ice Hockey Players. PEDIATRICS. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2015-1633  

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