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  • June 25, 2015
  • 05:33 PM
  • 850 views

Opioids and Barbituates Commonly Prescribed For Headaches

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Mia T. Minen, MD, MPH Director, Headache Services NYU Langone Medical Center Assistant professor, Department of Neurology   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Minen: We conducted … Continue reading →
The post Opioids and Barbituates Commonly Prescribed For Headaches appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Dr. Mia T. Minen, MD, MPH Director, Headache Services, NYU Langone Medical Center, & Assistant professor, Department of Neurology. (2015) Opioids and Barbituates Commonly Prescribed For Headaches. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • June 24, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 897 views

The CPU In Your Head

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

It’s hard to believe, but part of your brain – the part that controls your body systems – actually comes from your mouth! What’s more, that same part of the brain talks to cells in your lungs that can smell what you breathe in and may have something to do with Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.... Read more »

Gu, X., Karp, P., Brody, S., Pierce, R., Welsh, M., Holtzman, M., & Ben-Shahar, Y. (2014) Chemosensory Functions for Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cells. American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, 50(3), 637-646. DOI: 10.1165/rcmb.2013-0199OC  

  • June 23, 2015
  • 01:11 PM
  • 1,276 views

Bipolar Disorder Linked to Increased Dementia Risk

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

A variety of risk factors have been identified in Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia.The risk for dementia following major psychiatric syndromes in mid-life is an important research area.Renate Zilkens and colleagues in Australia recently published an informative study of psychiatric disorders and later dementia risk. This study used a population-based case control methodology.The key elements in the design of this study included the following:Subjects: General population in Western........ Read more »

  • June 22, 2015
  • 01:05 AM
  • 753 views

Differences in Symptom Reporting Between Male and Female Athletes Before and After a Concussion

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Females are more likely to report concussion-related symptoms at baseline testing than males. However, following a concussion there are no differences in symptom reporting between male and female athletes.... Read more »

  • June 21, 2015
  • 01:41 PM
  • 629 views

Concussion Rates Differ Depending on Amount of Equipment and Type of Practice

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Practice concussion rates are highest during fully padded practices, preseason, and scrimmages.... Read more »

  • June 11, 2015
  • 09:19 PM
  • 248 views

Pre-Frontal Brain Cortex Size Linked To Moral Reasoning

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. rer. nat. Kristin Prehn, Dipl.-Psych. Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin Department of Neurology & NeuroCure Clinical Research Cente Berlin Germany MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Prehn: The study is … Continue reading →
The post Pre-Frontal Brain Cortex Size Linked To Moral Reasoning appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medic........ Read more »

Dr. rer. nat. Kristin Prehn, Dipl.-Psych., Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology , & Berlin Germany. (2015) Pre-Frontal Brain Cortex Size Linked To Moral Reasoning. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • June 10, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,209 views

Everybody Is Just A Little Twisted

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

You may have your head on straight, but your brain is still twisted. Everyone’s is. The symmetry of the brain is not absolute and the two halves are shaped differently, this results in your brain torquing (not twerking) inside your skull. The reasons are many, but one is gender: boy brains and girl brains really are different!... Read more »

Maller, J., Anderson, R., Thomson, R., Rosenfeld, J., Daskalakis, Z., & Fitzgerald, P. (2015) Occipital bending (Yakovlevian torque) in bipolar depression. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 231(1), 8-14. DOI: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2014.11.008  

Maller, J., Thomson, R., Rosenfeld, J., Anderson, R., Daskalakis, Z., & Fitzgerald, P. (2014) Occipital bending in depression. Brain, 137(6), 1830-1837. DOI: 10.1093/brain/awu072  

Mock, J., Zadina, J., Corey, D., Cohen, J., Lemen, L., & Foundas, A. (2012) Atypical Brain Torque in Boys With Developmental Stuttering. Developmental Neuropsychology, 37(5), 434-452. DOI: 10.1080/87565641.2012.661816  

Witelson, S., Kigar, D., & Harvey, T. (1999) The exceptional brain of Albert Einstein. The Lancet, 353(9170), 2149-2153. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(98)10327-6  

  • June 9, 2015
  • 01:00 PM
  • 703 views

Improving memory through deep brain stimulation: the very first steps

by Pierre Megevand in Neuroscience and Medicine

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been one of the biggest success stories of clinical neuroscience, thanks to its ability to reverse the symptoms of tremors, Parkinson’s disease, and a growing number of neurological and psychiatric conditions without any of the unwanted side effects of pharmacological therapies. Because DBS could in theory modulate any cerebral structure or network, researchers are starting to think about targeting cognitive functions such as memory. In a study published re........ Read more »

  • June 8, 2015
  • 01:05 AM
  • 570 views

School’s Need To Be Smarter With Their Return To Learning Guidelines

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

There is a wide variability in compliance of schools and school nurses with national recommendations for return to learning following a concussion.
... Read more »

  • June 3, 2015
  • 09:15 AM
  • 1,096 views

Left-Handers Have Prettier Brains

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Take a quick look at the human brain and it seems very symmetrical. Well, it’s not. Which hand you use can help determine just how symmetrical your brain actually is, and for some people that’s really important – they were born with only half a brain!... Read more »

Rogers, L., Zucca, P., & Vallortigara, G. (2004) Advantages of having a lateralized brain. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 271(Suppl_6). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2004.0200  

Muckli, L., Naumer, M., & Singer, W. (2009) Bilateral visual field maps in a patient with only one hemisphere. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106(31), 13034-13039. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0809688106  

  • May 31, 2015
  • 10:33 PM
  • 909 views

Capgras for Cats and Canaries

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Capgras syndrome is the delusion that a familiar person has been replaced by a nearly identical duplicate. The imposter is usually a loved one or a person otherwise close to the patient.Originally thought to be a manifestation of schizophrenia and other psychotic illnesses, the syndrome is most often seen in individuals with dementia (Josephs, 2007). It can also result from acquired damage to a secondary (dorsal) face recognition system important for connecting the received images with an affe........ Read more »

Ellis, H., & Young, A. (1990) Accounting for delusional misidentifications. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 157(2), 239-248. DOI: 10.1192/bjp.157.2.239  

Rösler, A., Holder, G., & Seifritz, E. (2001) Canary Capgras. The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 13(3), 429-429. DOI: 10.1176/jnp.13.3.429  

  • May 30, 2015
  • 01:00 PM
  • 892 views

From Broca’s area to Broca’s aphasia: a tale of two eponyms

by Pierre Megevand in Neuroscience and Medicine

A trip through time to 19-Century Paris, where Dr. Paul Broca examined a patient whose inability to speak and brain damage soon both became known worldwide. And a reexamination with modern neuroscientific techniques of the links between Broca's two namesakes: the aphasia and the brain region.... Read more »

Flinker A, Korzeniewska A, Shestyuk AY, Franaszczuk PJ, Dronkers NF, Knight RT, & Crone NE. (2015) Redefining the role of Broca's area in speech. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(9), 2871-5. PMID: 25730850  

  • May 16, 2015
  • 03:00 PM
  • 766 views

Shooting the Phantom Head (perceptual delusional bicephaly)

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

I have two headsWhere's the man, he's late--Throwing Muses, Devil's Roof Medical journals are enlivened by case reports of bizarre and unusual syndromes. Although somatic delusions are relatively common in schizophrenia, reports of hallucinations and delusions of bicephaly are rare. For a patient to attempt to remove a perceived second head by shooting and to survive the experience for more than two years may well be unique, and merits presentation. --David Ames, British Journal of Psychiatry (1........ Read more »

Ames, D. (1984) Self shooting of a phantom head. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 145(2), 193-194. DOI: 10.1192/bjp.145.2.193  

  • May 15, 2015
  • 05:12 AM
  • 553 views

A role for Matrix Metalloproteinases in BHD?

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

The BHD protein folliculin (FLCN) plays a role in numerous signalling pathways and cellular processes. Although mutations in FLCN are only firmly linked to the development of fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts and renal tumours it is possible that disruption of these pathways also plays a role in other phenotypes. Recently Kapoor et al., (2015) reported three cases studies of women with BHD who presented with intracranial vascular pathologies. There are few other reports of vascular pathologies ........ Read more »

Kapoor R, Evins AI, Steitieh D, Bernardo A, & Stieg PE. (2015) Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome and intracranial vascular pathologies. Familial cancer. PMID: 25952757  

  • May 11, 2015
  • 01:05 AM
  • 671 views

A Good Night’s Sleep Could Go A Long Way with Neurocognitive Performance

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletes who reported sleeping difficulties during preseason neurocognitive testing performed worse on neurocognitive exams after a concussion and reported more symptoms following a concussion compared with those who reported no difficulties sleeping.... Read more »

  • April 28, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,374 views

Quicksilver: The Avenger With Mutations For Speed

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

The New Avengers movie comes out in a couple days. In this film, a new Avenger named Quicksilver makes his debut. Quicksilver is a mutant who can run fast – really fast. What mutation could make him that fast? Well, science has found several gene changes he might use to become a superhero.... Read more »

Reyes, N., Banks, G., Tsang, M., Margineantu, D., Gu, H., Djukovic, D., Chan, J., Torres, M., Liggitt, H., Hirenallur-S, D.... (2015) Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(2), 424-429. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1413021112  

Potter, M., Wyble, B., Hagmann, C., & McCourt, E. (2013) Detecting meaning in RSVP at 13 ms per picture. Attention, Perception, , 76(2), 270-279. DOI: 10.3758/s13414-013-0605-z  

  • April 27, 2015
  • 01:05 AM
  • 664 views

As if Sustaining a TBI was not Enough….TBI May Accelerate Brain Aging

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A patient with a moderate or severe traumatic brain injury is likely to have structural brain changes that are associated with an older brain than his/her actual age.... Read more »

Cole JH, Leech R, Sharp DJ, & Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. (2015) Prediction of brain age suggests accelerated atrophy after traumatic brain injury. Annals of Neurology, 77(4), 571-81. PMID: 25623048  

  • April 27, 2015
  • 12:53 AM
  • 939 views

FDA says no to marketing FDDNP for CTE

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently admonished TauMark™, a brain diagnostics company, for advertising brain scans that can diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Alzheimer's disease, and other types of dementia. The Los Angeles Times reported that the FDA ordered UCLA researcher Dr. Gary Small and his colleague/business partner Dr. Jorge Barrio to remove misleading information from their company website (example shown below).CTE has been in the news because the neurodegene........ Read more »

Barrio, J., Small, G., Wong, K., Huang, S., Liu, J., Merrill, D., Giza, C., Fitzsimmons, R., Omalu, B., Bailes, J.... (2015) In vivo characterization of chronic traumatic encephalopathy using [F-18]FDDNP PET brain imaging. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201409952. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1409952112  

Zimmer, E., Leuzy, A., Gauthier, S., & Rosa-Neto, P. (2014) Developments in Tau PET Imaging. The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, 41(05), 547-553. DOI: 10.1017/cjn.2014.15  

  • April 23, 2015
  • 04:52 PM
  • 391 views

Seizure Medication Reduced Optic Neuritis In Multiple Sclerosis

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Raj Kapoor National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Kapoor: Current treatments for Multiple Sclerosis do not prevent disability which … Continue reading →
The post Seizure Medication Reduced Optic Neuritis In Multiple Sclerosis appeared first on MedicalResearch.com........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Raj Kapoor. (2015) Seizure Medication Reduced Optic Neuritis In Multiple Sclerosis. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • April 20, 2015
  • 01:05 AM
  • 804 views

Delayed Onset of Concussion Symptoms may Predict Delayed Recovery in Young Athletes

by Kathleen Cummer in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Delayed onset of symptoms after sport-related concussion puts young athletes at a 20.7 times greater risk for postconcussion syndrome... Read more »

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