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  • August 7, 2014
  • 06:58 AM
  • 686 views

http://dailyfusion.net/2014/07/wind-turbines-feeding-opportunities-30753/

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at the University of St Andrews have discovered that offshore pipelines and wind turbines can provide new feeding opportunities for the wildlife population in the area.... Read more »

Russell, D., Brasseur, S., Thompson, D., Hastie, G., Janik, V., Aarts, G., McClintock, B., Matthiopoulos, J., Moss, S., & McConnell, B. (2014) Marine mammals trace anthropogenic structures at sea. Current Biology, 24(14). DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.06.033  

  • August 6, 2014
  • 08:15 AM
  • 1,263 views

Fall Leaves And Orange Flamingos

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Flamingos are pink because of their diet, but greater and lesser flamingos eat different things – and neither food is pink. The spirulina food of the lesser flamingo is a cyanobacterium called Arthospira fusiformis. Unforunately, there have been large die offs in lesser flamingos. Recent research has shown that this may be due to toxic alga blooms and production of toxins even by A. fusiformis. In addition, a newer study has shown that a bacteriophage is responsible for large die offs of A........ Read more »

Anderson MJ, & Williams SA. (2010) Why do flamingos stand on one leg?. Zoo biology, 29(3), 365-74. PMID: 19637281  

Peduzzi P, Gruber M, Gruber M, Schagerl M. (2014) The virus's tooth: cyanophages affect an African flamingo population in a bottom-up cascade. ISME J. , 8(6), 1346-1351. info:/

  • August 1, 2014
  • 03:11 AM
  • 1,574 views

Floating Fried Eggs

by beredim in Strange Animals

Fried Egg JellyfishCotylorhiza tuberculataThe common name says it all. This weird-looking jellyfish literally looks like a fried egg! Scientifically known as Cotylorhiza tuberculata, it is one of the two jellyfish species that resemble a fried egg. The other one is Phacellophora camtschatica. Not surprisingly, it also goes by the same name.They may look tasty, but you probably don't want to have one for breakfast! However, you can have a lot of fun with C. tuberculata. This jellyfish has a ........ Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 08:10 AM
  • 1,568 views

Tough Talking Apes

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

The new Planet of the Apes movie has talking apes! In the old Charleton Heston versions, the apes had thousands of years to evolve speech capabilities, but Dawn of the Planet of the Apes takes place only 10 years after their escape from the lab. Anatomical differences between human and ape hyoid position, rib musculature and tongue show us why speech is not possible for Cesar and his friends. In addition, new research points out the importance of the foxp2 protein for speech and auditory functio........ Read more »

  • July 24, 2014
  • 02:55 AM
  • 1,388 views

Quick, Somebody Get The Name Of That Shark!

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

There has been a rash of great white shark sightings and attacks in the news recently. But, have attacks and sightings remained constant, or are they really on the increase? Several news studies provide evidence that the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, the ban on commercial whaling in 1982, and the ban on great white hunting in 1997 have increased the number of sharks on the coasts of the North America and Australia. In addition, great white sharks live much longer than previously assumed,........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 939 views

Let's Get Loud

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Loud noises are common in nature. New research is giving clues as to how and why animals make such noise. A new study investigates the reasons that howler monkeys howl. Protection and marking territory are main reasons, including for protection of infants or feeding areas.

A slightly older study notes that blue whale song has become lower in pitch since the whaling ban. The authors suggest that the reason for this may be that males don’t have to sing as loud (higher frequencies are loud........ Read more »

  • July 21, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,363 views

Quick, Somebody Get The Name Of That Shark!

by Mark Lasbury in The 'Scope

Are sightings and attacks by great white sharks rare and staying rare? Or has the faster news cycle led to the need for more sensational stories and therefore more coverage? It may be a bit of both.... Read more »

  • July 18, 2014
  • 08:51 AM
  • 1,362 views

Scientists Create Alcohol-Resistant Worms That Might Cure Alcoholism

by beredim in Strange Animals

Image showing the effects of alchohol in Caenorhabditis elegans and..humansCredit: Jon Pierce-Shimomura from The University of Texas, Austin.A couple of days ago, a team of neuroscientists from the University of Texas, Austin announced that they have created a new strain of mutant worms which is impervious to the intoxicating effects of alcohol!To create the alcohol-immune worms, the researchers implanted a modified human alcohol target – a neuronal channel called the BK channel SLO-1 tha........ Read more »

  • July 14, 2014
  • 05:58 PM
  • 473 views

The polyglot bee

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll Communication is essential for humans, and so it is for other animals that live in groups. It is intersting that even though modern humans only came to be about 200,000 years ago, the number of languages … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 11, 2014
  • 07:33 PM
  • 561 views

Elephants don’t have fun painting

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll Elephants are considered animals of high intelligence and social complexity, able to solve puzzles, use tools, show empathy and have self-awareness. Moreover, of course, they have an amazing memory. When in captivity, elephants use to become … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 08:15 AM
  • 1,006 views

What’s So Repelling About Repellents?

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

It’s amazing that even though citronella and DEET reduce mosquito bites, we have very little idea of how they work. New research is showing that DEET interacts with olfactory receptors so that chemical attractants are still sensed, but their interpretations are confused. You are still there, but you pretty disappear as far as the mosquito is concerned. Other research shows that one of the co-receptors for olfactory receptors is responsible not only for DEET activity, but also for mosquito ........ Read more »

  • July 6, 2014
  • 11:07 AM
  • 963 views

New Species of Spider Wasp Uses Ant Corpses to Protect Its Nests

by beredim in Strange Animals

A newly discovered wasp species uses the corpses of dead ants as scarecrows, to protect its nest from predators, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Freiburg. Scientifically described as Deuteragenia ossarium and dubbed as the Bone-house wasp, the species uses the chemical cues from ant corpses to ward off predators, by stuffing them into the crevices of its home. The species was discovered in Jiangxi Province in south east China.Wasps use a wide range of ........ Read more »

  • July 5, 2014
  • 09:22 AM
  • 1,024 views

True Facts About The Fruit Bat

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: This amusing video shares a few facts about the amazing megabats -- the largest flying mammals alive in the world today. Orphaned baby fruit bats. ... Read more »

  • July 3, 2014
  • 02:25 AM
  • 819 views

Journal Club: DNA analysis indicates Bigfoot may be a big fake

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: A new genetic analysis of 'yeti' hair samples reveals they actually originated from dogs, horses, bears or other known mammals. ... Read more »

  • July 2, 2014
  • 03:54 PM
  • 1,035 views

Plant = Pill?

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

E. Longfolia: an aphrodisiac, anti-inflammatory, and anti-malarial miracle plant. [Infographic]... Read more »

Tran TV, Malainer C, Schwaiger S, Atanasov AG, Heiss EH, Dirsch VM, & Stuppner H. (2014) NF-κB inhibitors from Eurycoma longifolia. Journal of natural products, 77(3), 483-8. PMID: 24467387  

  • July 2, 2014
  • 08:25 AM
  • 1,275 views

How Do Mosquitoes Find You?

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Spend much time outside in the summer and you will have to deal with mosquitoes. The mechanisms that females use to find a blood meal are becoming better understood. New research shows how the proboscis probes for a blood vessel, perhaps using the TRPA1 heat sensing ion channel as a signal for nearby blood.

Once they feed, females lay eggs. New research indicates that they actually prefer water that contains the dead larvae of similar mosquitoes, dead from predators. The presence of predator........ Read more »

  • July 1, 2014
  • 09:37 PM
  • 1,443 views

DNA analysis indicates Bigfoot may be a big fake | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

A newly-published genetic analysis of hair samples suspected as being from a cryptic primate known by various names such as "bigfoot" or "yeti", has revealed they actually originated from dogs, horses, bears or other well known mammals. ... Read more »

  • June 29, 2014
  • 01:43 PM
  • 1,050 views

Wolf spiders walking on water

by Africa Gomez in BugBlog

The other day in the wildlife garden, I noticed a wolf spider, Pardosa sp., running on the pond water. I had to look closely as I had never seen them doing this and I wondered if it was a Pirate Wolf spider instead, which also live in the pond and are normally associated to water. But alas, no, it was definitely a common wolf spider like those living in my garden. She confortably moved by the water's edge, often with its front legs resting on the water surface, happily floated on the water ........ Read more »

  • June 26, 2014
  • 09:26 AM
  • 976 views

Why use fruit flies to study a gene involved in language?

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

This is the story behind our work on the function of the FoxP gene in the fruit fly Drosophila (more background info). As so many good things, it started with beer. Troy Zars and I were having a beer on […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...... Read more »

Mendoza, E., Colomb, J., Rybak, J., Pflüger, H., Zars, T., Scharff, C., & Brembs, B. (2014) Drosophila FoxP Mutants Are Deficient in Operant Self-Learning. PLoS ONE, 9(6). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0100648  

  • June 25, 2014
  • 08:15 AM
  • 1,232 views

They Can See The Blood Running Through You

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Vampire bats sense heat via pit organs in their nose-leaves, but they find their victims by sight, smell and echolocation. New research shows that an alternatively spliced version of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 is responsible for the heat sensing, but what do they use it for? Their teeth are so short that they must find blood vessels close to the surface – shallow vessels give off more heat than do deep vessels or skin where there is no large vessel.

Vampire bats occasionally feed on ........ Read more »

Patel R, Ispoglou S, & Apostolakis S. (2014) Desmoteplase as a potential treatment for cerebral ischaemia. Expert opinion on investigational drugs, 23(6), 865-73. PMID: 24766516  

Gracheva EO, Cordero-Morales JF, González-Carcacía JA, Ingolia NT, Manno C, Aranguren CI, Weissman JS, & Julius D. (2011) Ganglion-specific splicing of TRPV1 underlies infrared sensation in vampire bats. Nature, 476(7358), 88-91. PMID: 21814281  

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