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All posts; Tags Include "Toxicology"

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  • June 19, 2013
  • 09:45 PM
  • 1,668 views

Epinephrine for V Tach - Instant Death or Effective Treatment?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

The patient has V Tach (Ventricular Tachycardia) with a pulse. After amiodarone is given the patient's blood pressure drops and the patient becomes unstable. The patient is still awake, so cardioversion would be very painful and these physicians would need to get anesthesia to sedate the patient. I know - that anesthesia requirement is a bad policy and completely unnecessary for the safety of the patient, but it is politics in that facility. However, sedation for emergency cardioversion is ........ Read more »

  • May 2, 2013
  • 09:27 AM
  • 728 views

Bodyweight loss – a new industry benchmark to improve animal welfare in preclinical safety assessment

by Dr Fiona Sewell in NC3Rs Blog

Evidence from a multinational pharmaceutical industry collaboration shows this week that upper limits of bodyweight loss of 10 per cent in rats and dogs are sufficient for setting the maximum-tolerated dose in short-term toxicity studies. Where there has been no previously accepted evidence-based assessment criteria before now, Dr Fiona Sewell, NC3Rs, describes how the new recommendations were developed to improve the welfare of thousands of animals used in regulatory studies each year.... Read more »

  • May 1, 2013
  • 09:10 AM
  • 2,323 views

Venomous Plants – A Hairy Situation

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

There are many thousands of poison plants, but not too many are venomous. The nettles and the dendrocnidaes have hollow spines that deliver neurotoxins when they stab you. Recent research has shown that nettle toxin is beneficial in liver regeneration. It stimulates cell proliferation and reduces apoptosis. In an opposite effect, the dendrocnidae toxin called moroidin is a mitotic spindle inhibitor. It may prove useful as an anticancer drug.... Read more »

Hammond-Tooke, G., Taylor, P., Punchihewa, S., & Beasley, M. (2007) Urtica ferox neuropathy. Muscle , 35(6), 804-807. DOI: 10.1002/mus.20730  

  • April 24, 2013
  • 09:00 AM
  • 2,450 views

A Death Apple A Day Keeps…..

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Plants are great poison generators. Their toxins can affect skin, heart function, nerve function, or muscle function. In many cases plants make more than one toxin. The manchineel tree for instance, can induce everything from blindness to blisters to swelling of larynx. Oleander is toxic, but for different reasons, and urushiol from poison ivy induces a type IV hypersensitivity. Sounds like none of this is good for humans, but new research studies are showing medicinal values for these plant tox........ Read more »

  • April 19, 2013
  • 04:29 AM
  • 856 views

Gold nanoparticles penetrate and disrupt our stem cells

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

Today, gold and gold nanoparticles can be found almost everywhere, including personal care products, solar cells, rheumatoid arthritis drugs, MRI contrast agents etc. Generally, gold is universally recognised as the most inert of metals. However, a new study suggests that gold nanoparticles actually interact with our adipose stem cells, inhibiting their function and causing aging, wrinkling, slowed wound healing and even the onset of diabetes.Read More... Read more »

  • March 26, 2013
  • 11:30 AM
  • 994 views

Does the Goal of a Pulse Lead to Bad Resuscitation Decisions

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

The paper does address some interesting aspects of resuscitation.

ROSC (Return Of Spontaneous Circulation) is the goal for many people.

ROSC is a red herring.

Those of us who think ROSC is important do not seem to understand how much long-term damage we can do in our attempts to get ROSC, or to get ROSC quickly.

This study helps to point out some of the inconsistencies with our ROSC fetish.... Read more »

Koscik, C., Pinawin, A., McGovern, H., Allen, D., Media, D., Ferguson, T., Hopkins, W., Sawyer, K., Boura, J., & Swor, R. (2013) Rapid Epinephrine Administration Improves Early Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. Resuscitation. DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.03.023  

  • March 22, 2013
  • 11:00 AM
  • 1,156 views

Equipoise and Ethics and IRBs, Oh My!

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

In the comments to what I wrote yesterday about seizures and a study comparing lorazepam (Ativan), diazepam (Valium), and placebo,[1] Brooks Walsh had the following comment –

"Although I’ve read the study before, I am only wondering now how the IRB for Alldredge 2001 thought there was 'equipoise' between placebo and benzos."... Read more »

Alldredge BK, Gelb AM, Isaacs SM, Corry MD, Allen F, Ulrich S, Gottwald MD, O’Neil N, Neuhaus JM, Segal MR, Lowenstein DH. (2001) A Comparison of Lorazepam, Diazepam, and Placebo for the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Status Epilepticus. New England Journal of Medicine, 345(25), 1860-1860. DOI: 10.1056/NEJM200112203452521  

Callaway, C. (2012) Questioning the Use of Epinephrine to Treat Cardiac Arrest. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 307(11), 1198. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.313  

Hagihara A, Hasegawa M, Abe T, Nagata T, Wakata Y, Miyazaki S. (2012) Prehospital Epinephrine Use and Survival Among Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 307(11), 1161. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.294  

  • March 13, 2013
  • 09:00 AM
  • 2,043 views

One Man’s Poison Is Another Man’s Cure

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

In the early 16th century Paracelsus stated that it is the dose that makes the poison. He had to be thinking about botulinum toxin. This most potent of all toxins known to man has been used as a cosmetic agent for several years, but is now moving into the realm of the necessary pharmacopia, not merely the vanity market.

Use as a muscle relaxant in spasmodic dysphonic and even plantar fasciitis is common now, but a new study links botulinum toxin to chronic pain treatment. It seems that opiod........ Read more »

  • February 19, 2013
  • 10:29 PM
  • 1,485 views

Sprint Interval Training. High Intensity Interval Training. And CrossFit.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters

Sprint Interval Training (SIT or HIT) is a training strategy where an athlete goes "all out" for short burst of time.  Sprint Interval Training can be with short sprints, but it can also consist of short "all out" bursts of other exercises. It is more like CrossFit.  Research on SIT/HIT will tell us a lot about what CrossFit does to and for us.  Think Fran and consider the thrusters as the brief rests.  Sprint Interval Training is also called High Intensity Interval Training......... Read more »

  • February 4, 2013
  • 12:55 PM
  • 1,233 views

CrossFit Training: how does it compare to running?

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters


CrossFit and High Intensity Interval Training.


A CrossFit athlete recovers from a burst of intense exercise.

Endurance

exercise is recommended for cardiovascular health.  Years of research
have found that about 30 minutes of cardio will reduce risk of stroke
and heart attack.  It will also improve insulin sensitivity, reduce risk
of diabetes and improve memory and brain function.  Until very
recently, there has been little research on the benefits of CrossFit
type exerc........ Read more »

  • December 27, 2012
  • 10:00 PM
  • 986 views

If the patient is asleep, does that mean that the pain is gone?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Is it appropriate to stop giving pain medicine just because the patient is asleep?

My little burned patient was probably not expressing relief from pain with her periods of unresponsiveness – especially since she had not received anything for her severe pain. Each time that she woke up screaming, that was also a clue. the medical command doctor’s orders were to give no pain medicine.[1]

Is propofol effective at putting patients to sleep without relieving their pain?

Sleep do........ Read more »

Paqueron X, Lumbroso A, Mergoni P, Aubrun F, Langeron O, Coriat P, & Riou B. (2002) Is morphine-induced sedation synonymous with analgesia during intravenous morphine titration?. British journal of anaesthesia, 89(5), 697-701. PMID: 12393765  

  • December 25, 2012
  • 09:00 AM
  • 550 views

Top 10 most-read blog posts of 2012: #7

by Sanford- Burnham in Beaker

Dr. Matt Petroski and colleagues outline a new method to test a tumor’s resistance to an experimental therapy and pinpoint the genetic culprit before testing the drug in patients—providing a new path toward personalized medicine.... Read more »

  • December 19, 2012
  • 05:15 PM
  • 860 views

More evidence that antibiotics are over-prescribed - How should that change?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Today Lancet Infectious Diseases posted an early release of an article that shows that the antibiotic amoxicillin still does not work on viruses.

Many doctors still routinely prescribe antibiotics for viral infections.

Bias, perhaps the biggest confounder in medical research, is controlled for very well.

What does the study show?... Read more »

  • December 18, 2012
  • 04:20 PM
  • 975 views

CrossFit and Paleo: Are Beans good for you?

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters


Why aren't beans Paleo? A common CrossFit question.


WODMasters: Stiff, Inflexible, Invincible Designs

A lot of boxes put a lot of effort
into the importance of nutrition and a lot into the Paleolithic, primal
lifestyle.  Good nutrition is important.  A lot of people in CrossFit adhere to The Paleolithic Diet.   Sometimes it makes sense, but sometimes it doesn't.  There is, for example, a strict list of what is OK to eat and what is not.  Beans are not on the list. &........ Read more »

Oomah, B., Corbé, A., & Balasubramanian, P. (2010) Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Hulls. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 58(14), 8225-8230. DOI: 10.1021/jf1011193  

  • December 15, 2012
  • 01:46 PM
  • 1,307 views

Ruptured ear drums, inexperience and competitive pressure: CrossFit Competition leads to ruptured ear drums.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters






Ruptured ear drums, inexperience and competitive pressure.


Normal
0








false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE






































































































... Read more »

Rozsasi A, Sigg O, & Keck T. (2003) Persistent inner ear injury after diving. Otology , 24(2), 195-200. PMID: 12621331  

  • December 15, 2012
  • 01:44 PM
  • 1,002 views

CrossFit, Ruptured ear drums, inexperience and competitive pressure: CrossFit Competition leads to ruptured ear drums.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters

CrossFit, Ruptured ear drums, inexperience and competitive pressure. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE ... Read more »

Rozsasi A, Sigg O, & Keck T. (2003) Persistent inner ear injury after diving. Otology , 24(2), 195-200. PMID: 12621331  

  • December 14, 2012
  • 12:45 AM
  • 1,125 views

How do we measure the QT segment when there are prominent U waves?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This ECG has large T waves, U waves, and P waves, but where does one end and the other begin?

When measuring the QT segment, where do we measure the end of the QT segment and why?... Read more »

Omar, H. (2012) Amiodarone-induced T-U fusion. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 30(9), 20810-208100. DOI: 10.1016/j.ajem.2011.10.024  

  • November 29, 2012
  • 09:30 PM
  • 1,163 views

Is Digoxin a Killer?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Digoxin (Lanoxin) is an antiarrhythmic drug, which means that it is also a proarrhythmic drug. Any drug that affects the heart’s conduction system can produced changes that are bad, good, or a combination of the two. Digoxin has been associated with a higher death rate, but is that because it is prescribed to sicker patients?... Read more »

Whitbeck, M., Charnigo, R., Khairy, P., Ziada, K., Bailey, A., Zegarra, M., Shah, J., Morales, G., Macaulay, T., Sorrell, V.... (2012) Increased mortality among patients taking digoxin-analysis from the AFFIRM study. European Heart Journal. DOI: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehs348  

  • November 28, 2012
  • 01:34 PM
  • 1,158 views

Diet, Health and The Ketogenic Diet

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters






The Ketogenic Diet is a very low carbohydrate, high fat, "adequate protein" diet.  Ketogenic diets have proven helpful to people with uncontrolled epilepsy and may be of benefit to epileptics in general, to victims of stroke and other forms of brain injury and possibly cancer. It has become somewhat popular among CrossFit-ters and followers of he paleo-type diet.

They come with other effects that may not be worth the discomfort or unintended risks to healthy people. This includes kidn........ Read more »

Kossoff, E., Zupec-Kania, B., & Rho, J. (2009) Ketogenic Diets: An Update for Child Neurologists. Journal of Child Neurology, 24(8), 979-988. DOI: 10.1177/0883073809337162  

  • November 28, 2012
  • 01:33 PM
  • 790 views

CrossFit, Diet, Health and The Ketogenic Diet

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters

What is a ketogenic diet? Ketogenic Diet is a very low carbohydrate, high fat, "adequate protein" diet.  Ketogenic diets have proven helpful to people with uncontrolled epilepsy and may be of benefit to epileptics in general, to victims of stroke and other forms of brain injury and possibly cancer. It has become somewhat popular among CrossFit-ters and followers of the paleo diet.They come with other effects that may not be worth the discomfort or unintended risks to healthy people. This in........ Read more »

Kossoff, E., Zupec-Kania, B., & Rho, J. (2009) Ketogenic Diets: An Update for Child Neurologists. Journal of Child Neurology, 24(8), 979-988. DOI: 10.1177/0883073809337162  

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