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  • February 24, 2010
  • 04:45 AM
  • 1,736 views

Toxicology Conundrum #028

by sandnsurf in Life in the Fast Lane

A pharmacist in the Gibson Desert wanted to take part in the recent mass homeopathic overdose protest organized by the 10:23 movement. Unbeknown to him, the cleaning lady had been around and accidentally mixed up the homeopathic pills with slow release verapamil. After gulping down a couple of handfuls of pills, the pharmacist's heightened gustatory awareness alerted him to the presence of verapamil in the tablets. Although he remains asymptomatic, he has a feeling that something bad might hap........ Read more »

  • February 17, 2010
  • 02:49 AM
  • 3,254 views

The Misuse of Quetiapine

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


A lot of medication gets misused, as is the right expression, meaning not used for the intention or indication it was developed for in the first place. This reminded me of one of my first publications on the abuse of anticholinergics.
From case reports it appears that quetiapine is sought after for recreational use and inappropriate [...]


Related posts:Music Preference and Substance Use From a large Dutch epidemiological study: overall, when all...
Is deep brain stimulation neuroprotective i........ Read more »

  • February 4, 2010
  • 08:22 PM
  • 1,936 views

Toxicology Conundrum #024

by sandnsurf in Life in the Fast Lane

A 23 year-old male is brought to your ED by a friend. He appears anxious, distressed and confused. His friend volunteers that the patient had seen a GP in the past few weeks as he was feeling depressed. The friend also admitted that the patient occasionally used recreational drugs such as marijuana and ecstasy. Further of examination of the patient was notable for the presence of shaking eye movements, brisk deep tendon reflexes and stiffness of the lower limbs...


Related posts:Toxicology Conu........ Read more »

Boyer EW, & Shannon M. (2005) The serotonin syndrome. The New England journal of medicine, 352(11), 1112-20. PMID: 15784664  

Isbister GK, Buckley NA, & Whyte IM. (2007) Serotonin toxicity: a practical approach to diagnosis and treatment. Medical Journal of Australia, 187(6), 361-5. PMID: 17874986  

  • December 21, 2009
  • 03:36 PM
  • 1,271 views

PCBs escape burial in aquatic sediments, infiltrate terrestrial food webs, and put birds at risk

by David Raikow in River Continua

While other issues of ecological concern, like climate change, receive popular attention, the problems that initially raised environmental awareness, like pollution, take a back seat. Yet these problems are not only still with us, they are spreading.... Read more »

  • September 22, 2009
  • 02:58 PM
  • 1,806 views

When Pseudoscience Kills – Trust, Denialism, and Peter Duesberg

by colinhockings in Blue Genes

– This is a guest post written for Blue-Genes by Ben Vincent. He will be back regularly with more on HIV/AIDS
For scientists working in the field of HIV and AIDS, discussion of denialists can be at best tiring and at worst infuriating. This isn’t because a (‘good’) scientist can’t engage in a meaningful debate [...]... Read more »

Ascher, M., Sheppard, H., Jr, W., & Vittinghoff, E. (1993) Does drug use cause AIDS?. Nature, 362(6416), 103-104. DOI: 10.1038/362103a0  

  • September 29, 2008
  • 11:00 AM
  • 2,845 views

Does genistein interfere with breast cancer therapy?

by Orac in Respectful Insolence

More than two-thirds of breast cancers make the estrogen receptor. What that means is that these tumors have the protein receptor that binds estrogen, which then activates the receptor and causes all the genes that are turned on or off by estrogen to be turned on and off. That's how estrogen acts on normal breast epithelial cells and on breast cancer cells. The significance of this observation is that estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers respond to estrogen. Indeed, estrogen contribut........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 08:33 PM
  • 1,055 views

CrossFit and Paleo: Should All Plastics Be Avoided?

by ABK in Environment and Health


This post covers one of the problems posed by endocrine disruptors (ECDs) that I don't think has gotten a lot attention, or at least broad enough attention. This is the issue of estrogen-mimics.  These are also known as Xenoestrogens.    A lot of people seem to be aware of BPA and take steps to avoid it. However, BPA is a relatively small part of the story. Plastics labeled BPA-free may not be Estrogen Activity-Free at all (Yang et al. 2011).

Normal estrogen acts by do........ Read more »

Katzenellenbogen JA. (1995) The structural pervasiveness of estrogenic activity. Environmental health perspectives, 99-101. PMID: 8593885  

Ogura Y, Ishii K, Kanda H, Kanai M, Arima K, Wang Y, & Sugimura Y. (2007) Bisphenol A induces permanent squamous change in mouse prostatic epithelium. Differentiation; research in biological diversity, 75(8), 745-56. PMID: 17459086  

  • December 31, 1969
  • 08:33 PM
  • 972 views

CrossFit Info: Heat dissipation is key to athletic performance

by ABK in Environment and Health

Work on the effects of heat on athletic performance continues (see earlier post "What are we fighting when we try to push through a challenging workout" for in depth discussion). This is an important area of research for most of us because heat may be the limiting factor in performance. You body will try its best to make you stop exercising when your brain temperature reaches a certain level. Muscle cells will also start to function poorly when they are heat stressed. This is due, in part of........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 08:33 PM
  • 964 views

What are Obesogens and do I need to worry about them?

by ABK in Environment and Health







Most of this post has appeared on my Environmental Chemicals Blog, which is now being used as an example blog for a Biology course with a Science Blogging component. However, I thought it might be an interesting read for people who, despite eating well and working out like fiends, are still struggling to lean out. It is also a good read for people who want to protect their children, future children or grandkids from metabolic disorders later in life.  Here goes.



Obesity can make ........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 08:33 PM
  • 847 views

CrossFit and Paleo: Alcohol and Diabetes

by ABK in Environment and Health




From a purely health-oriented perspective, alcohol is one of those things where a little seems to be good and more than a little puts you at risk for a bad health outcome. One of the positive things small regular intake can do for you is protect you from diabetes. There is good epidemiological evidence that this is the case. Light drinkers are less likely to develop diabetes than those who abstain.






As most people know, just because two things occur together does not mean that one c........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 08:33 PM
  • 1,053 views

Exercise may protect your jaws and prevent tooth loss.

by ABK in Environment and Health





Exercise, especially weight-bearing exercise, builds bone and protects against osteoporosis and frailty later in life.  Unfortunately, only bone under stress seems to benefit.  For example, runners, who carry their own body weight, tend to have stronger leg bones than cyclists.  CrossFit provides excellent training for bone strength.  It includes weighted movements that target, stress and should strengthen most of the bones in the human body.  That is provided you do........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 08:33 PM
  • 925 views

CrossFit and Supplements: What about Leucine?

by ABK in Environment and Health






What is leucine?
Leucine is a branched chain amino acid (bcaa). A lot of people in the CrossFit and Paleo communities are either strongly for it, or strongly against it.   Researchers have identified it as a signal for muscle synthesis in animals. So, there's good a good chance it would do the same in people.   It has been studied as a supplement for humans. A number of these studies have shown increased muscle synthesis and faster recovery in both older and younger men. Wastin........ Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,451 views

More evidence that antibiotics are over-prescribed - How should that change?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Today Lancet Infectious Diseases posted an early release of an article that shows that the antibiotic amoxicillin still does not work on viruses.

Many doctors still routinely prescribe antibiotics for viral infections.

Bias, perhaps the biggest confounder in medical research, is controlled for very well.

What does the study show?... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 807 views

The Fatal Flaw in Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This is not a study that has a valid control group to determine if there is any benefit from ventilation. There is no group that does not receive ventilations, so it is like a study of one type of blood-letting vs. another type of blood-letting with the researchers taking for granted that blood-letting does improve outcomes. That is not a problem if blood-letting actually improves outcomes.

Should we take it for granted that blood-letting improves outcomes and that the only hypothesis worth s........ Read more »

Nichol, G., Leroux, B., Wang, H., Callaway, C., Sopko, G., Weisfeldt, M., Stiell, I., Morrison, L., Aufderheide, T., Cheskes, S.... (2015) Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509139  

Alldredge BK,, Gelb AM,, Isaacs SM,, Corry MD,, Allen F,, Ulrich S,, Gottwald MD,, O’Neil N,, Neuhaus JM,, Segal MR,.... (2001) A Comparison of Lorazepam, Diazepam, and Placebo for the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Status Epilepticus. New England Journal of Medicine, 345(25), 1860-1860. DOI: 10.1056/NEJM200112203452521  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,496 views

The Fatal Flaw in Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This is not a study that has a valid control group to determine if there is any benefit from ventilation. There is no group that does not receive ventilations, so it is like a study of one type of blood-letting vs. another type of blood-letting with the researchers taking for granted that blood-letting does improve outcomes. That is not a problem if blood-letting actually improves outcomes.

Should we take it for granted that blood-letting improves outcomes and that the only hypothesis worth s........ Read more »

Nichol, G., Leroux, B., Wang, H., Callaway, C., Sopko, G., Weisfeldt, M., Stiell, I., Morrison, L., Aufderheide, T., Cheskes, S.... (2015) Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509139  

Alldredge BK,, Gelb AM,, Isaacs SM,, Corry MD,, Allen F,, Ulrich S,, Gottwald MD,, O’Neil N,, Neuhaus JM,, Segal MR,.... (2001) A Comparison of Lorazepam, Diazepam, and Placebo for the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Status Epilepticus. New England Journal of Medicine, 345(25), 1860-1860. DOI: 10.1056/NEJM200112203452521  

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