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  • June 1, 2012
  • 09:51 AM
  • 842 views

Why cutting gluten out of your diet may set you up for trouble later.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters




This is a scary post to post. One of us actually got reamed pretty hard for questioning the party line and almost quit CrossFit over it, but here goes anyway . . .

The human gut maintains large bacterial populations. In fact they outnumber you by about 10 to 1 on a cell to cell level (as in for each of your cells, there are ten bacteria). Each of us is a walking bus. We are designed to be this way. Our bacterial passengers have always been here. Our good health requires passengers who are n........ Read more »

Shelor, C., Kirk, A., Dasgupta, P., Kroll, M., Campbell, C., & Choudhary, P. (2012) Breastfed Infants Metabolize Perchlorate. Environmental Science , 46(9), 5151-5159. DOI: 10.1021/es2042806  

  • May 25, 2012
  • 11:21 PM
  • 486 views

Nutrition and protein: training, performance and long-term health.

by ABK in Environment and Health




These are interwoven issues. The aim of training is improve the body’s ability to perform certain tasks (and in the case of CrossFit it is to achieve a high degree of effectiveness and competence in a wide range of skills and efforts).


Lucas Allen and Summer Rogers at the SouthCentral
Crossfit 2012 Regionals.  Both are in their thirties.

The goal of nutrition in training is to help the body (the entire thing) adapt and remodel, or at least maintain what you have and can do......... Read more »

  • May 25, 2012
  • 09:18 PM
  • 944 views

Nutrition and protein: training, performance and long-term health.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters




These are interwoven issues. The aim of training is improve the body’s ability to perform certain tasks (and in the case of CrossFit it is to achieve a high degree of effectiveness and competence in a wide range of skills and efforts).


The goal of nutrition in training is to help the body (the entire thing) adapt and remodel, or at least maintain what you have and can do. Bodies like efficiency. Your body will see no point in maintaining bone or muscle that does not look like it’s ........ Read more »

  • May 23, 2012
  • 05:37 PM
  • 989 views

Strength vs. Endurance and the Master Athlete.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters





A Master and a very Junior Athlete.

Masters Crossfitters, face a problem of having to work harder to build speed and strength, and maintain it, than do more junior athletes.  There is unfortunately not a lot of research on Masters' performance and most of what there is focused on endurance athletes like swimmers, runners and cyclists.  And little to go by when training as a Crossfit Master.  As Crossfitters we need everything: speed, endurance and strength.  As a general........ Read more »

Reaburn, P., & Dascombe, B. (2008) Anaerobic performance in masters athletes. European Review of Aging and Physical Activity, 6(1), 39-53. DOI: 10.1007/s11556-008-0041-6  

  • May 22, 2012
  • 02:00 PM
  • 1,086 views

How Diagnostic is Narcan?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

At Resus.ME,[1] Dr. Reid suggests that one benefit of nebulized naloxone[2] is its diagnostic value. He asks –

"Do you ever use naloxone diagnostically, and if so, do you think it’s worth knowing that the nebulised route is an option?"

This has been studied.... Read more »

  • May 22, 2012
  • 11:51 AM
  • 1,112 views

What are we fighting when we try to push through a challenging workout?

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters






We are fighting a lot. There are times we may be fighting a bad attitude, discouragement, lack of confidence, drive or our own personalities, but we are, at times, also fighting a very complex regulatory system designed to protect us from severe self-induced damage. Fatigue can be defined as reaching a point where the body seeks to slow down or stop. Exhaustion is that point where a person (or animal) is unable to continue. The most important factor driving suppression of motor activity........ Read more »

  • May 20, 2012
  • 04:52 PM
  • 1,391 views

Energy Drinks: What’s the Big Deal?

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox


The sons of Red Bull are sporting record concentrations of caffeine.
Are energy drinks capable of pushing some people into caffeine-induced psychotic states? Some medical researchers think so, under the right set of conditions.
Red Bull, for all its iconic ferocity, is pretty tame, weighing in at approximately half a cup of coffee. Drinks like Monster Energy and Full Throttle push it up to 100-150, or the equivalent of a full cuppa joe, according to USDA figures at Talk About Coffee. That does........ Read more »

  • May 20, 2012
  • 12:41 PM
  • 1,237 views

Crossfit and the Search for the Perfect Diet: Aboriginal Australians and the Swiss

by ABK in Environment and Health

Perusing Google News this morning I came across an article claiming that "Research Shows CrossFit Diet/Exercise Reduces Risk of Heart Disease".  I clicked on that one immediately because, to the best of my knowledge, no scientific research has been published on relationships between high intensity CrossFit-type training and cardiovascular disease. If one were to do a search today on Web of Knowledge using the search term "Crossfit" you would get a single hit:Jansen, J., van Dam, N., Hoefs........ Read more »

  • May 15, 2012
  • 09:26 PM
  • 407 views

Breastfed infants metabolize perchlorate?

by ABK in Environment and Health

This is a test post to check whether or not research blogging can pick it up. This (below) is actually a very interesting article. Shelor et al. 2012 report significant differences between perchlorate excretion in breast and formula-fed infants, and provide evidence that bifidobacteria, which are common in the digestive tracks of breast fed but not formula-fed infants, drives breakdown of perchlorate. This is important because breastfed infants are thought to be a group most vulnerable to the........ Read more »

Shelor, C., Kirk, A., Dasgupta, P., Kroll, M., Campbell, C., & Choudhary, P. (2012) Breastfed Infants Metabolize Perchlorate. Environmental Science , 46(9), 5151-5159. DOI: 10.1021/es2042806  

  • May 15, 2012
  • 01:27 PM
  • 389 views

What are we fighting when we strive to "Just Do It?"

by ABK in Environment and Health

Cody Zamaripa: not really a Master, but he definitely pushed it. We are fighting a lot. There are times we may be fighting a bad attitude, discouragement, lack of confidence, drive or our own personalities, but we are, at times, also fighting a very complex regulatory system designed to protect us from severe self-induced damage. Fatigue can be defined as reaching a point where the body seeks to slow down or stop. Exhaustion is that point where a person (or animal) is unable to continue. Th........ Read more »

  • May 15, 2012
  • 12:25 PM
  • 2,712 views

Methylone, or beta-keto-MDMA, also causes fatality

by DrugMonkey in DrugMonkey

A series of 3 Cases of fatality wherein methylone consumption was found causal by the Medical Examiner... Read more »

Julia M. Pearson, Tiffanie L. Hargraves, Laura S. Hair, Charles J. Massucci, C. Clinton Frazee III, Uttam Garg, & B. Robert Pietak. (2012) Case Report: Three Fatal Intoxications Due to Methylone . Journal of Analytical Toxicology. info:/

  • May 14, 2012
  • 05:33 PM
  • 834 views

Things to Consider for Masters Training

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters




 



Remember who you are
now:


Crossfit Seven Master Athlete Mark P. Demos Pull-ups


More confident, smart and astute.   Less of an idiot.  Less impulsive.  Still, every now and then the cognitive and physical end up on different pages. You know that awkward feeling you get when
you dive for a Frisbee, knowing exactly where your body should have been to
gracefully capture it?  Don’t let that
happen with a heavy weight. 



Reduce other sources
of stres........ Read more »

  • May 14, 2012
  • 05:30 PM
  • 835 views

Long-term exercise prevents muscle loss in Masters Athletes.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters






We all fear loss of strength and competence that might occur if we were to actually get older. We've probably all heard, and seen ourselves, that people lose muscle mass and bone with advancing age. Its depressing. While ignoring it and putting concerns aside works pretty well generally speaking, its nice when evidence supports our drive and desire to have a good time while staying strong. Exercise prevents much of the muscle loss seen in older people. A lot of the muscle loss observed in s........ Read more »

Wroblewski, A., Amati, F., Smiley, M., Goodpaster, B., & Wright, V. (2011) Chronic Exercise Preserves Lean Muscle Mass in Masters Athletes. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 39(3), 172-178. DOI: 10.3810/psm.2011.09.1933  

KORHONEN, M., MERO, A., ALÉN, M., SIPILÄ, S., HÄKKINEN, K., LIIKAVAINIO, T., VIITASALO, J., HAVERINEN, M., & SUOMINEN, H. (2009) Biomechanical and Skeletal Muscle Determinants of Maximum Running Speed with Aging. Medicine , 41(4), 844-856. DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181998366  

  • May 11, 2012
  • 01:50 AM
  • 1,209 views

What Did Deep DNA Sequencing of Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) Really Reveal?

by Laika Spoetnik in Laika's Medliblog

A recent study published in PLOS genetics[1] on a genetic audit of Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) was widely covered in the news. The headlines are a bit confusing as they said different things. Some headlines say “Dangers of Chinese Medicine Brought to Light by DNA Studies“, others that Bear and Antelope DNA are Found in Traditional Chinese Medicine, and still others more neutrally: Breaking down traditional Chinese medicine.

What have Bunce and his group really done and wh........ Read more »

  • May 10, 2012
  • 01:22 PM
  • 1,627 views

The date rape drug you already own, and anti-date rape straws!

by Nerdy One in Try Nerdy

Understatement of the century: date rape is not cool. Neither committing it, nor being a victim of it, should ever ever happen. As such, I want to promote awareness of something that could potentially be used as a date rape drug, but that’s also found in practically everyone’s medicine cabinet.

I’ve been conflicted for a long time about blogging about this, because I don’t want to enable those who seek to do bad things, but in the end I’ve decided that knowledge ........ Read more »

  • April 24, 2012
  • 07:30 PM
  • 1,050 views

Glucose before Thiamine for Wernicke Encephalopathy – A Literature Review

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Maybe that explains how the requirement for thiamine before glucose came about – confabulation.

Many of our traditional treatments are better explained by confabulation, based on a persuasive hypothesis, than by any evidence of benefit to the patient.... Read more »

  • April 12, 2012
  • 11:45 PM
  • 1,121 views

Most Common Cause of Death in Anaphylaxis is Failure to Give Epinephrine

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

The most common cause of death in anaphylaxis is failure to give epinephrine.

That is according to Dr. Corey Slovis, presenting at the 2012 Gathering of Eagles Conference.[1]

This is shocking news. Where do we have any evidence of that?... Read more »

  • April 5, 2012
  • 10:30 PM
  • 1,440 views

Naloxone in cardiac arrest with suspected opioid overdoses

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Can naloxone improve survival from cardiac arrest?

This is an interesting study that looks at some old charts to try to figure out if naloxone made any difference when it was given to cardiac arrest patients suspected of having an opioid overdose. Here is the interesting part of their hypothesis –... Read more »

Saybolt, M., Alter, S., Dos Santos, F., Calello, D., Rynn, K., Nelson, D., & Merlin, M. (2010) Naloxone in cardiac arrest with suspected opioid overdoses. Resuscitation, 81(1), 42-46. DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2009.09.016  

  • April 1, 2012
  • 07:25 PM
  • 971 views

The 'Connexin' between Tylenol and Liver Injury

by Nsikan Akpan in That's Basic Science

MIT/Harvard study finds that liver toxins spread from cell-to-cell via gap junctions. ... Read more »

Patel, S., Milwid, J., King, K., Bohr, S., Iracheta-Velle, A., Li, M., Vitalo, A., Parekkadan, B., Jindal, R., & Yarmush, M. (2012) Gap junction inhibition prevents drug-induced liver toxicity and fulminant hepatic failure. Nature Biotechnology, 30(2), 179-183. DOI: 10.1038/nbt.2089  

  • March 23, 2012
  • 09:00 AM
  • 964 views

Dr. Ken Grauer on Killing Patients Just to Get a Temporary Pulse With Epinephrine – Part II

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Dr. Ken Grauer wrote a couple of extended comments in response to "Killing Patients Just to Get a Temporary Pulse With Epinephrine."

Dr. Grauer has provided some commentary on this on his web site – KG-EKG Press.

"ISSUE #10: Should We Still Use Epinephrine for Cardiac Arrest?"

So, how bad was epinephrine in this study?... Read more »

Hagihara, A., Hasegawa, M., Abe, T., Nagata, T., Wakata, Y., & Miyazaki, S. (2012) Prehospital Epinephrine Use and Survival Among Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 307(11), 1161-1168. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.294  

Callaway, C. (2012) Questioning the Use of Epinephrine to Treat Cardiac Arrest. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 307(11), 1198-1200. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.313  

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