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All posts; Tags Include "Toxicology"

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  • August 2, 2012
  • 04:45 PM
  • 1,488 views

The fun side of STDs!

by NerdyOne in Try Nerdy

So, if you’re STD savvy, you might have realized that all of the plush toys above are named after venereal diseases. These adorable little guys are the Venereals. I want to reiterate that these are cuddly toys that look like the actual infectious agents that give you these diseases. A little weird, maybe? Yes.

But I own them all. Can you imagine a better conversation starter? (“Oh that’s cute, what is that little star-shaped toy?” …”Herpes.” :) ). If........ Read more »

  • July 31, 2012
  • 04:34 PM
  • 937 views

Hormones Mimics and Canned Food

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters

Bisphenol A is commonly known as BPA. It is produced in large quantities for use in plastic products including the linings of tin cans, water bottles, and, until very recently, in baby bottles. There are some pretty serious concerns with BPA. Structurally, it resembles estrogen, the female sex hormone. The human body reacts to it in a manner that resembles its reaction to estrogen.

BPA has been tested in lab animals. Human research has shown that what is happening to lab animals may be hap........ Read more »

  • July 26, 2012
  • 08:26 AM
  • 743 views

Should men increase selenium intake to increase testosterone?

by ABK in Environment and Health


There seems to be a lot out in the popular press or online material that increasing selenium intake will increase a healthy man's testosterone but little, if anything, in the scientific literature to support that idea. There has also been recent emphasis on consumption of Brazil nuts as a natural source of selenium that will boost testosterone and increase virility. You’ve probably heard guys, especially Masters guys, talking about it at CrossFit or elsewhere in your circle. So far there is ........ Read more »

  • July 24, 2012
  • 04:53 PM
  • 895 views

Should men increase selenium intake to increase testosterone?

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters


There seems to be a lot out in the popular press or online material that increasing selenium intake will increase a healthy man's testosterone but little, if anything, in the scientific literature to support that idea. There has also been recent emphasis on consumption of Brazil nuts as a natural source of selenium that will boost testosterone and increase virility. You’ve probably heard guys, especially Masters guys, talking about it at CrossFit or elsewhere in your circle. So far there is ........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2012
  • 04:35 PM
  • 997 views

Research Shows CrossFit Diet/Exercise Reduces Risk of Heart Disease." Cool.

by ABK in Environment and Health


"Research Shows CrossFit Diet/Exercise Reduces Risk of Heart Disease".  An article in Google News had this headline. Could that be true? Probably. A diet low in refined carbohydrates and high in vegetables and fruit, as well as an active lifestyle has long been associated with reduced risk of death and disease. However, no scientific research as been published on relationships between CrossFit training and cardiovascular disease. If one were to do a search today on Web of Knowledge usi........ Read more »

  • July 22, 2012
  • 02:31 PM
  • 1,121 views

Research Shows CrossFit Diet/Exercise Reduces Risk of Heart Disease." Cool.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters


"Research Shows CrossFit Diet/Exercise Reduces Risk of Heart Disease".  An article in Google News had this headline. Could that be true? Probably. A diet low in refined carbohydrates and high in vegetables and fruit, as well as an active lifestyle has long been associated with reduced risk of death and disease. However, no scientific research as been published on relationships between CrossFit training and cardiovascular disease. If one were to do a search today on Web of Knowledge usi........ Read more »

  • July 19, 2012
  • 09:20 AM
  • 976 views

Should Athletes Use Anti-Microbial Fabrics?

by ABK in Environment and Health


Silver nanoparticles are woven into high-tech athletic clothing as a means of controlling bacteria and odors.  How it kills bacteria is not completely understood, but it is believed to kill through oxidative stress.  Oxidative stress is harmful for us as well, but bacteria can be killed at lower levels.  Still, oxidative stress is not good.  That's why anti-oxidants are protective against cancer and other forms of cell damage.  Silver nanoparticles are used in topical a........ Read more »

  • July 18, 2012
  • 06:57 PM
  • 1,395 views

The Summer Olympics and the “War on Doping”

by Dirk Hanson in Addiction Inbox

 
Time for a change in strategy?

The Summer Olympics are fast approaching, and that can only mean one thing: drugs. After more than a decade, you might wonder, how goes the so-called “War on Doping?”

Not so good, but thanks for asking. The World Anti-Doping Agency, established in 1999 and backed by the UNESCO anti-doping convention, will be operating 24/7 during the games, protecting the “purity” of Sport, trying to ferret out everything from cannabis and cocaine to steroids and ........ Read more »

Kayser B, & Broers B. (2012) The Olympics and harm reduction?. Harm reduction journal, 9(1), 33. PMID: 22788912  

  • July 15, 2012
  • 11:59 PM
  • 1,056 views

Should Athletes Use Anti-Microbial Fabrics?

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters


Silver nanoparticles are woven into high-tech athletic clothing as a means of controlling bacteria and odors.  Silver has low toxicity for people, but is able to kill bacteria.  How it kills bacteria is not completely understood, but it is believed to cause oxidative stress.  Oxidative stress is harmful for us as well, but bacteria can be killed at lower levels than can hurt us.  Still, oxidative stress is not good.  That's why anti-oxidants are protective against cance........ Read more »

  • June 28, 2012
  • 10:00 PM
  • 885 views

Are Whey-Based Protein Powders Better for Athletes?

by ABK in Environment and Health




A lot of athletes, with
CrossFit and others, supplement their protein intake with protein
powders (such as whey) or by eating more meat and some from the old
school swear by drinking a lot of milk.  So what's best?

It turns out that for
weight loss, whey is better at reducing appetite and food intake than
red meat, soy protein or milk (Huang et al. 2008), and produces less of
an insulin response.  Whey contains a protein/hormone called relaxin.  One of the things relaxin........ Read more »

Nakajima K, Kanno Y, Nakamura M, Gao XD, Kawamura A, Itoh F, & Ishisaki A. (2011) Bovine milk lactoferrin induces synthesis of the angiogenic factors VEGF and FGF2 in osteoblasts via the p44/p42 MAP kinase pathway. Biometals : an international journal on the role of metal ions in biology, biochemistry, and medicine, 24(5), 847-56. PMID: 21404021  

Yamamoto, H., Arai, T., Tasaka, R., Mori, Y., Iguchi, K., Unno, K., & Hoshino, M. (2009) Inhibitory Effect of Relaxin-3 on Insulin Secretion in Isolated Pancreas and Insulinoma. JOURNAL OF HEALTH SCIENCE, 55(1), 132-137. DOI: 10.1248/jhs.55.132  

  • June 25, 2012
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,618 views

Laryngospasm, hypoxia, excited delirium, and ketamine – Part II

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Continuing from Part I, where our excited delirium patient was sedated quickly with IM (IntraMuscular) ketamine, but developed laryngospasm and cyanosis later at the hospital.

Do we have a good drug to prevent muscular spasm of the smooth muscles?

Can we ventilate him again? Yes, but there is a bit of a pattern developing. It would not be good to ignore the possibility that this will not be the last episode of laryngospasm for this patient today.... Read more »

Burnett AM, Watters BJ, Barringer KW, Griffith KR, & Frascone RJ. (2012) Laryngospasm and hypoxia after intramuscular administration of ketamine to a patient in excited delirium. Prehospital emergency care : official journal of the National Association of EMS Physicians and the National Association of State EMS Directors, 16(3), 412-4. PMID: 22250698  

  • June 21, 2012
  • 04:00 PM
  • 1,135 views

Laryngospasm, hypoxia, excited delirium, and ketamine - Part I

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

One of the concerns with ketamine is the rare occurrence of laryngospasm.

Can EMS manage the airway without paralytics?

If we can find just one bad outcome,should we prohibit EMS ketamine use and thus prevent all of the good outcomes, just to be safe?

Let’s look at an actual example, rather than waxing philosophical.... Read more »

Burnett AM, Watters BJ, Barringer KW, Griffith KR, & Frascone RJ. (2012) Laryngospasm and hypoxia after intramuscular administration of ketamine to a patient in excited delirium. Prehospital emergency care : official journal of the National Association of EMS Physicians and the National Association of State EMS Directors, 16(3), 412-4. PMID: 22250698  

  • June 19, 2012
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,229 views

One hundred percent oxygen in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and severe angina pectoris

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

In the absence of hypoxia, is supplemental oxygen good for a patient with cardiac chest pain, but no hypoxia or shortness of breath?

We take it for granted that giving oxygen is good, and more oxygen is better, even if the patient is not hypoxic or short of breath, but what does the research show for cardiac patients?

This double-blinded study, released only 62 years ago – in 1950, strongly suggests that supplemental oxygen is not good for patients with chest pain and/or ECG changes......... Read more »

  • June 15, 2012
  • 01:36 AM
  • 1,158 views

Are Whey-Based Protein Powders Better for Athletes?

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters




A lot of athletes, with
CrossFit and others, supplement their protein intake with protein
powders (such as whey) or by eating more meat and some from the old
school swear by drinking a lot of milk.  So what's best?


It turns out that for
weight loss, whey is better at reducing appetite and food intake than
red meat, soy protein or milk (Huang et al. 2008), and produces less of
an insulin response.  Whey contains a protein/hormone called relaxin.  One of the things relaxi........ Read more »

Nakajima K, Kanno Y, Nakamura M, Gao XD, Kawamura A, Itoh F, & Ishisaki A. (2011) Bovine milk lactoferrin induces synthesis of the angiogenic factors VEGF and FGF2 in osteoblasts via the p44/p42 MAP kinase pathway. Biometals : an international journal on the role of metal ions in biology, biochemistry, and medicine, 24(5), 847-56. PMID: 21404021  

Yamamoto, H., Arai, T., Tasaka, R., Mori, Y., Iguchi, K., Unno, K., & Hoshino, M. (2009) Inhibitory Effect of Relaxin-3 on Insulin Secretion in Isolated Pancreas and Insulinoma. JOURNAL OF HEALTH SCIENCE, 55(1), 132-137. DOI: 10.1248/jhs.55.132  

  • June 12, 2012
  • 07:10 PM
  • 1,237 views

Toxic and toothsome: a tale of two wild Asteraceae

by aewills in A Bouquet From Mendel

Toxic Interloper: Not long ago, I planted a bunch of coriander/cilantro seeds in my back yard.  When the seedlings emerged, I found not only cilantro, but also this: Senecio vulgaris, known as common groundsel to me, but also as Old-man-of-the-spring. … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • June 10, 2012
  • 02:06 PM
  • 635 views

Masters Athletes respond to protein intake and resistance exercise as well as young athletes.

by ABK in Environment and Health



This is an interesting bit of research.  It was published a year ago but doesn't seem to have been picked up by news sources.  Here it is: Masters muscles respond to protein intake and resistance exercise by making more muscle as well as young adults.  The study (Patton-Jones et al. 2011) looked at 7 young adults and 7 adults with an average age of 67.  They did multiple reps of knee extensions and ate a meal of lean ground beef.  Its a small number of people, which li........ Read more »

Symons TB, Sheffield-Moore M, Mamerow MM, Wolfe RR, & Paddon-Jones D. (2011) The anabolic response to resistance exercise and a protein-rich meal is not diminished by age. The journal of nutrition, health , 15(5), 376-81. PMID: 21528164  

  • June 9, 2012
  • 05:24 PM
  • 831 views

Masters Athletes respond to protein intake and resistance exercise as well as young athletes.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters



This is an interesting bit of research.  It was published a year ago but doesn't seem to have been picked up by news sources.  Here it is: Masters muscles respond to protein intake and resistance exercise by making more muscle as well as young adults.  The study (Patton-Jones et al. 2011) looked at 7 young adults and 7 adults with an average age of 67.  They did multiple reps of knee extensions and ate a meal of lean ground beef.  Its a small number of people, which li........ Read more »

Symons TB, Sheffield-Moore M, Mamerow MM, Wolfe RR, & Paddon-Jones D. (2011) The anabolic response to resistance exercise and a protein-rich meal is not diminished by age. The journal of nutrition, health , 15(5), 376-81. PMID: 21528164  

  • June 8, 2012
  • 12:17 PM
  • 590 views

The very basics of Insulin: what Masters Crossfit and people in general should know.

by ABK in Environment and Health



This post is in response to stuff we overhear, or see repeated on CrossFit affiliate websites, or are told by well-meaning individuals:  The message we keep encountering is that insulin is bad.  A quote that seems to have been copied and pasted to a number of different sites is "insulin makes people sedentary" and it has been attributed to Dr. Robert Lustig.  If he wrote this, it was probably taken out of context and then confused.  That sort of thing happens all the time.&........ Read more »

Dunstan, D., Kingwell, B., Larsen, R., Healy, G., Cerin, E., Hamilton, M., Shaw, J., Bertovic, D., Zimmet, P., Salmon, J.... (2012) Breaking Up Prolonged Sitting Reduces Postprandial Glucose and Insulin Responses. Diabetes Care, 35(5), 976-983. DOI: 10.2337/dc11-1931  

Hoehn KL, Salmon AB, Hohnen-Behrens C, Turner N, Hoy AJ, Maghzal GJ, Stocker R, Van Remmen H, Kraegen EW, Cooney GJ.... (2009) Insulin resistance is a cellular antioxidant defense mechanism. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106(42), 17787-92. PMID: 19805130  

  • June 4, 2012
  • 01:55 PM
  • 847 views

The very basics of Insulin: what Masters Crossfit and people in general should know.

by Andrea Kirk in WODMasters



This post is in response to stuff we overhear, or see repeated on CrossFit affiliate websites, or are told by well-meaning individuals:  The message we keep encountering is that insulin is bad.  A quote that seems to have been copied and pasted to a number of different blogs and sites is "insulin makes people sedentary" and it has been attributed to Dr. Robert Lustig.  If he wrote this (and a source for the quote has not been found) it was probably taken out of context and then ........ Read more »

Dunstan, D., Kingwell, B., Larsen, R., Healy, G., Cerin, E., Hamilton, M., Shaw, J., Bertovic, D., Zimmet, P., Salmon, J.... (2012) Breaking Up Prolonged Sitting Reduces Postprandial Glucose and Insulin Responses. Diabetes Care, 35(5), 976-983. DOI: 10.2337/dc11-1931  

Hoehn KL, Salmon AB, Hohnen-Behrens C, Turner N, Hoy AJ, Maghzal GJ, Stocker R, Van Remmen H, Kraegen EW, Cooney GJ.... (2009) Insulin resistance is a cellular antioxidant defense mechanism. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106(42), 17787-92. PMID: 19805130  

  • June 4, 2012
  • 01:52 PM
  • 546 views

Why cutting gluten out of your diet may set you up for trouble later: the microbial explaination

by ABK in Environment and Health




This is a scary post to post. One of us actually got reamed pretty hard for questioning the party line and almost quit CrossFit over it, but here goes anyway . . .

The human gut maintains large bacterial populations. In fact they outnumber you by about 10 to 1 on a cell to cell level (as in for each of your cells, there are ten bacteria). Each of us is a walking bus. We are designed to be this way. Our bacterial passengers have always been here. Our good health requires passengers who are n........ Read more »

Shelor, C., Kirk, A., Dasgupta, P., Kroll, M., Campbell, C., & Choudhary, P. (2012) Breastfed Infants Metabolize Perchlorate. Environmental Science , 46(9), 5151-5159. DOI: 10.1021/es2042806  

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