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All posts; Tags Include "Solar and Stellar Astrophysics"

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  • November 1, 2016
  • 09:01 AM
  • 545 views

Multiwavelength study of 20 jets that emanate from the periphery of active regions by Sargam M. Mulay et al.*

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

Solar jets are transient phenomena observed in the solar atmosphere. They appear as sharp-edged, impulsive, and collimated flows of plasma that move outwards with a bright spot at the footpoint, which forms an ‘inverted-Y’ topology of magnetic field lines. They are observed throughout the atmosphere i.e. in the photosphere (Hα, Ca II K [...]... Read more »

Mulay et al. (2006) Multiwavelength study of 20 jets that emanate from the periphery of active regions. Astronomy . info:/

  • October 18, 2016
  • 09:02 AM
  • 573 views

Decameter type III bursts with changing frequency drift-rate signs by V. Melnik et al.*

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

We discuss properties of type III bursts that change the sign of their drift rate from negative to positive and vice versa. Moreover, these bursts may change the sign of their drift rates more than once. These particular type III bursts were observed simultaneously by the radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN-2, [...]... Read more »

V. Melnik et al. (2015) Decameter type III bursts with changing frequency drift-rate signs . Solar Physics. info:/

  • October 4, 2016
  • 09:05 AM
  • 571 views

Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections: Aerodynamic Drag by Nishtha Sachdeva and Prasad Subramanian

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are hot, massive blobs of plasma and magnetic fields that erupt from the Sun, and are sometimes Earth-directed. Depending on their speed and mass these transients can strongly effect the space weather, causing geomagnetic storms and damage to space bound technologies. It is therefore imperative to [...]... Read more »

Sachdeva, N., Subramanian, P., Colaninno, R., et al.,. (2015) Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections: Aerodynamic Drag. Astrophysical Journal, 158. info:/

  • August 30, 2016
  • 09:04 AM
  • 440 views

On the thermal nature of 140 GHz emission from the 4 July 2012 solar flare by Yuriy Tsap et al.*

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

The nature of the solar flare sub-THz emission (Kaufmann, 2012) with a positive spectral slope at 200-400 GHz is still not clear..... Read more »

Yuriy Tsap et al.*. (2016) On the thermal nature of 140 GHz emission from the 4 July 2012 solar flare. Advances in Space Research, 2016, 57, 1449. info:/

  • August 23, 2016
  • 09:02 AM
  • 441 views

Bright 30 THz impulsive solar bursts by Pierre Kaufmann et al.*

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

Impulsive 30 THz continuum bursts have been recently observed in solar flares, utilizing small telescopes with a unique and relatively simple optical setup concept (Kaufmann et al. 2015). The most intense burst was observed together with a GOES X2 class event on October 27, 2014, also detected at two sub-THz [...]... Read more »

Pierre Kaufmann et al. (2016) Bright 30 THz impulsive solar bursts . Journal of Geophys. Res. info:/

  • August 16, 2016
  • 09:04 AM
  • 412 views

Decameter U-burst Harmonic Pair from a High Loop by Dorovskyy, Melnik, Konovalenko, Bubnov , Gridin, Shevchuk, Rucker, Poedts and Panchenko

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

We discuss the results of recent observations of a solar U-burst harmonic pair in the frequency range 10-70 MHz, performed by the radio telescope UTR-2 ...... Read more »

Dorovskyy et al. (2016) Decameter U-burst Harmonic Pair from a High Loop by Dorovskyy et al. Solar Physics. info:/

  • August 9, 2016
  • 09:24 AM
  • 429 views

Particle Acceleration and heating by turbulent reconnection by L. Vlahos, T. Pisokas, H. Isliker, V. Tsiolis and A. Anastasiadis

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

Fermi (1949) introduced a fundamental stochastic process to solve the problem of particle energization (heating and/or acceleration) in space and astrophysical plasmas. The initial idea of Fermi with randomly moving scatterers (magnetic clouds), was soon replaced with a spectrum of low amplitude (δΒ/Β... Read more »

by L. Vlahos, T. Pisokas, H. Isliker, V. Tsiolis and A. Anastasiadis. (2016) Particle Acceleration and heating by turbulent reconnection. ApJ. info:/

  • June 14, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 988 views

Pluto and Planetary Pinball

by Angela Reisetter in Steeped in Science

A description of the formation of the solar system and how we think it got to be how it is today, with a focus on Pluto and Kuiper belt.... Read more »

Thayne Currie, Carey M. Lisse, Marc J. Kuchner, Nikku Madhusudhan, Scott J. Kenyon, Christian Thalmann, Joseph Carson, & John H. Debes. (2015) Direct Imaging and Spectroscopy of a Young Extrasolar Kuiper Belt in the Nearest OB Association. Astrophysical Journal Letters. arXiv: 1505.06734v1

Konstantin Batygin, & Gregory Laughlin. (2015) Jupiter's Decisive Role in the Inner Solar System's Early Evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. arXiv: 1503.06945v2

  • January 21, 2015
  • 07:24 AM
  • 1,034 views

Space Exploration 2.0

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Redefining space exploration: SpaceX's crazy week in the private space race. [Infographic]... Read more »

  • December 4, 2014
  • 02:21 PM
  • 1,388 views

ALMA Japan: Hi-Def Imaging of Spiral Gas Arms from Twin Baby Stars (w/video)

by DJ Busby in Astronasty

We know that about half the the stars out there (with sizes close to that of our sun) are binary systems. However, for a long time we've been lacking information on how they develop, since it's not been easy to get a whole lot of data from surrounding scattered mass that's so damned far away! Congrats to all involved!... Read more »

Shigehisa Takakuwa, Masao Saito, Kazuya Saigo, Tomoaki Matsumoto, Jeremy Lim, Tomoyuki Hanawa, & Paul T. P. Ho. (2014) Angular Momentum Exchange by Gravitational Torques and Infall in the Circumbinary Disk of the Protostellar System L1551 NE. The Astrophysical Journal. arXiv: 1409.4903v1

  • November 5, 2013
  • 07:43 AM
  • 1,389 views

What White Dwarfs Can Tell Us About the Universe

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Researchers from Europe and the U.S. have ruled out a multitude of possible parameters for dark photons – a type of dark matter and energy – with the help of white dwarfs. In some aspects, the shining of these dying stars gives more information on dark forces than is provided by earth-based laboratories. The journal … Read More →... Read more »

Herbert K. Dreiner, Jean-François Fortin, Jordi Isern, & Lorenzo Ubaldi. (2013) White Dwarfs constrain Dark Forces. Phys. Rev. D, 88(4). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.88.043517  

  • October 25, 2013
  • 11:40 AM
  • 2,127 views

What Aliens From Another World Will Look Like

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Invading aliens from outer space won’t look like a Lady Gaga zombie or creatures with serious nasal drip problems. Top planetary scientists have now come up with different sketches of how aliens might appear. Here, then, are what real aliens will most likely look like if they drop on your house. First, the alien won’t … Read More →... Read more »

Cosmovici, C., Pluchino, S., Salerno, E., Montebugnoli, S., Zoni, L., & Bartolini, M. (2007) Radio Search for Water in Exo-Planetary Systems. Extreme Solar Systems, 33. info:/

  • October 16, 2013
  • 10:45 AM
  • 1,445 views

How the Largest Known Star is Tearing Itself Apart

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

An international team of astronomers has observed part of the final death throes of the largest known star in the Universe as it throws off its outer layers. The discovery, by a collaboration of scientists from the UK, Chile, Germany and the USA, is a vital step in understanding how massive stars return enriched material … Read More →... Read more »

Nicholas J. Wright, Roger Wesson, Janet E. Drew, Geert Barentsen, Michael J. Barlow, Jeremy R. Walsh, Albert Zijlstra, Jeremy J. Drake, Jochen Eisloffel, & Hywel J. Farnhill. (2013) The Ionized Nebula surrounding the Red Supergiant W26 in Westerlund 1. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. arXiv: 1309.4086v1

  • May 2, 2013
  • 09:50 AM
  • 1,466 views

Meteorites May Reveal Mars’ Secrets of Life

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

In an effort to determine if conditions were ever right on Mars to sustain life, a team of scientists, including a Michigan State University professor, has examined a meteorite that formed on the red planet more than a billion years ago. And although this team’s work is not specifically solving the mystery, it is laying … Read More →... Read more »

  • January 29, 2013
  • 04:54 PM
  • 905 views

Ridges on Mars Suggest Ancient Flowing Water

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Networks of narrow ridges found in impact craters on Mars appear to be the fossilized remnants of underground cracks through which water once flowed, according to a new analysis by researchers from Brown University. The study, in press in the journal Geophysical Research Letters (cited below) bolsters the idea that the subsurface environment on Mars once had an [...]... Read more »

Lee Saper, & John F. Mustard. (2013) Extensive linear ridge networks in Nili Fossae and Nilosyrtis, Mars: Implications for fluid flow in the ancient crust. Geophysical Research Letters . info:/10.1002/grl.50106

  • October 18, 2012
  • 10:42 AM
  • 1,448 views

Searching for Extraterrestrial Microbes

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Locating thermophiles in other parts of the universe could very well aid in the search for extraterrestrial life. Most people have agreed that if life is found among the stars, it will be microbial (at least in the near-term future). Many individuals have also suggested that intelligent life forms might very well be extinct in [...]... Read more »

  • September 26, 2012
  • 06:00 PM
  • 1,380 views

Supernova 1006 lived fast and left no companion behind

by Kelly Oakes in Basic Space

A supernova that lit up the skies in the year 1006 lived and died fast, leaving no companion star behind, astronomers have found. The result is the latest clue in a puzzle that has been troubling astronomers for some time – how does this type of stellar explosion happen?... Read more »

Jonay I. González Hernández, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Hugo M. Tabernero, David Montes, Ramon Canal, Javier Méndez, & Luigi R. Bedin. (2012) No surviving evolved companions of the progenitor of SN 1006. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature11447  

  • September 17, 2012
  • 01:27 AM
  • 1,573 views

What Microfossils Found in Meteorites Can Tell Us

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

While most people associate the term microfossil with the strange ALH 84001 object, there are plenty of other more concrete examples of tiny fossilized organisms. Research conducted with scanning electron microscope equipment has created a wide array of scientific literature regarding these small remains of living organisms. While marine objects don’t necessary have anything to [...]... Read more »

  • June 4, 2012
  • 10:25 AM
  • 1,288 views

Tree Rings and A Cosmic Mystery

by GDW in The Beast, the Bard and the Bot

Between AD 774 and 775 something weird happened. And that something weird resulted in a 12% increase of 14C (a radioactive form of carbon) in the atmosphere. How do we even know this? Tree rings. Earlier work had enabled the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 23, 2012
  • 07:27 AM
  • 2,149 views

Robotic Telesurgery in Space

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Telemedicine is a field that uses telecommunications technology to provide healthcare at a distance. Certain computer systems can be linked to a physician’s office for diagnostic purposes. Different clinics and hospitals can be linked together. In the future, telemedicine could be used to perform robotic surgeries in space. Some forms of telemedicine have been in [...]... Read more »

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