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  • May 10, 2016
  • 04:47 AM
  • 701 views

Getting Published (the story behind the paper)

by Christophe Dessimoz in Open Reading Frame

Our paper “A Pragmatic Approach to Getting Published: 35 Tips for Early Career Researchers” just came out in Frontiers in Plant Science. This is the story behind the paper.

For my second postdoc, I was the fortunate receipient of a PLANT FELLOWS scholarship. PLANT FELLOWS is an international program that provides research grants to postdocs in the field of plant science. The fellows are based at many different host institutions throughout Europe. I myself am working at Bayer Crop Science ........ Read more »

Glover, N., Antoniadi, I., George, G., Götzenberger, L., Gutzat, R., Koorem, K., Liancourt, P., Rutowicz, K., Saharan, K., You, W.... (2016) A Pragmatic Approach to Getting Published: 35 Tips for Early Career Researchers. Frontiers in Plant Science. DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2016.00610  

  • April 26, 2016
  • 11:42 AM
  • 640 views

You Scratch My Back

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

Where does the idea of a scientist as a crazed loner come from. Let's work together!... Read more »

Brown, R., Deletic, A., & Wong, T. (2015) Interdisciplinarity: How to catalyse collaboration. Nature, 525(7569), 315-317. DOI: 10.1038/525315a  

AG McCluskey. (2016) You Scratch My Back.. Zongo's Cancer Diaries. info:/

  • April 7, 2016
  • 01:22 PM
  • 858 views

From the NY Times: Biologists went rogue and publish directly on the Internet

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The ASAP Bio conference held in February at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, US, brought together biomedicine researchers to discuss new ways to communicate research results using preprints and post-publication peer review. Renowned scientists, including several Nobel Prize winners started to deposit their articles in open access preprint repositories before proceeding with the formal publication in journals. The topic received last week the attention of the New York Times. … Read More........ Read more »

  • March 31, 2016
  • 12:28 PM
  • 901 views

Reproducibility in research results: the challenges of attributing reliability

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Recently projects have been developed with the aim to reproduce published research results in psychology, biology and economics to verify their reliability. The results indicate different degrees of reproducibility in each area, however, they served to alert the scientific community about how fragile results considered irrefutable can be and reflect on the role of science in self-correcting. … Read More →... Read more »

Anderson, C., Bahnik, �., Barnett-Cowan, M., Bosco, F., Chandler, J., Chartier, C., Cheung, F., Christopherson, C., Cordes, A., Cremata, E.... (2016) Response to Comment on "Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science". Science, 351(6277), 1037-1037. DOI: 10.1126/science.aad9163  

Allison, D., Brown, A., George, B., & Kaiser, K. (2016) Reproducibility: A tragedy of errors. Nature, 530(7588), 27-29. DOI: 10.1038/530027a  

Camerer, C., Dreber, A., Forsell, E., Ho, T., Huber, J., Johannesson, M., Kirchler, M., Almenberg, J., Altmejd, A., Chan, T.... (2016) Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics. Science, 351(6280), 1433-1436. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf0918  

  • March 31, 2016
  • 06:36 AM
  • 800 views

Thoughts on pre- vs. post-publication peer-review

by Christophe Dessimoz in Open Reading Frame

A few months ago, we published a paper that spent four years in peer-review (story behind the paper). Because of this, I feel entitled to an opinion on the pre- vs post-publication review debate.

Background on preprints and their effect on peer-review

If you have been living under a rock, or if you are not on Twitter, you may not have noticed that preprints are becoming more widely accepted in biology—supported by initiatives such as Haldane’s Sieve and bioRxiv. This is particularly tr........ Read more »

  • March 22, 2016
  • 04:23 PM
  • 793 views

On the dangers of SciHub and hybrid journals

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Changes and developments in the way things are done are sometimes seen as threatening, as dangers. That is a natural, instinctive reaction, perhaps, but sometimes, the danger lies not so much in the development itself as in the things that the development in question prevents. There are two developments in science publishing and science communication that are seen as dangerous by many. Both developments are seen as threatening from opposite sides of the fence, so to speak. … Read More U........ Read more »

  • March 16, 2016
  • 05:06 PM
  • 722 views

FAIR guiding principles published in journal of the Nature Publishing Group family

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The FAIR principles provide at a high level of abstraction a precise and measurable set of qualities for research data publication and reuse - Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR). These principles address the increasing need of rigorous data management stewardship applicable to both human and computational users which will soon become a core activity within contemporary research projects in Open Science environments. … Read More →... Read more »

Wilkinson, M., Dumontier, M., Aalbersberg, I., Appleton, G., Axton, M., Baak, A., Blomberg, N., Boiten, J., da Silva Santos, L., Bourne, P.... (2016) The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship. Scientific Data, 160018. DOI: 10.1038/sdata.2016.18  

  • March 10, 2016
  • 09:45 AM
  • 776 views

Speeding up research communication: the actions of SciELO

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The SciELO Program has been promoting the individualized publication of articles, increasing the frequency of publication and the anticipation of publication of new issues. The goal is to contribute to the improvement of SciELO journals in line with the current trend to accelerate research communication. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 7, 2016
  • 12:51 AM
  • 903 views

From evolutionary morphology to Godzilla

by adam phillips in It Ain't Magic

I recently spoke with Chief Scientist Shigeru Kuratani about evolutionary morphology, sci-fi monsters, the genius of Alien, and more.... Read more »

Sugahara, F., Pascual-Anaya, J., Oisi, Y., Kuraku, S., Aota, S., Adachi, N., Takagi, W., Hirai, T., Sato, N., Murakami, Y.... (2016) Evidence from cyclostomes for complex regionalization of the ancestral vertebrate brain. Nature, 531(7592), 97-100. DOI: 10.1038/nature16518  

  • March 4, 2016
  • 05:29 PM
  • 813 views

May excessive transparency damage Science?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The scholarly community promoted and encouraged research transparency to curb the lack of reproducibility and scientific misconduct. However, this openness also opens room for attacks and harassment of researchers, often motivated by simple discrepancy between the results and even threats of physical and psychological violence. Learn how to recognize and protect yourself from attacks of this nature. … Read More →... Read more »

Wolfe-Simon, F., Blum, J., Kulp, T., Gordon, G., Hoeft, S., Pett-Ridge, J., Stolz, J., Webb, S., Weber, P., Davies, P.... (2010) A Bacterium That Can Grow by Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus. Science, 332(6034), 1163-1166. DOI: 10.1126/science.1197258  

  • February 19, 2016
  • 08:24 AM
  • 676 views

Evidence Shmevidence 2: Consensus Nonsense

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

The scientific consensus tells us what we currently know. But what is the "Consensus"? How does it work? And why do so many people get the wrong idea about it...?... Read more »

Kahan, D., Jenkins‐Smith, H., & Braman, D. (2011) Cultural cognition of scientific consensus. Journal of Risk Research, 14(2), 147-174. DOI: 10.1080/13669877.2010.511246  

  • February 12, 2016
  • 07:34 AM
  • 644 views

Evidence, Shmevidence

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

The world is full of ideas. How does science decide which ideas are good and which are bad...?... Read more »

Scott O. Lilienfeld, Steven Jay Lynn, Rachel J. Ammirati. (2015) Science Versus Pseudoscience. The Encyclopedia of Clinical Psychology. DOI: 10.1002/9781118625392.wbecp572  

AG McCluskey. (2016) Evidence, Shmevidence. Zongo's Cancer Diaries. info:/

  • February 2, 2016
  • 12:53 PM
  • 989 views

Are ‘predatory’ journals completely negative, or also a sign of something positive?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Something that is generally, and justifiably, considered negative, can, however, also be a harbinger of an underlying positive development. The case in point is the existence of so-called ‘predatory’ journals, which have – inevitably – emerged in an environment in which a true market for scientific publishing services is slowly taking shape. … Read More →... Read more »

Ding, X., Wellman, H., Wang, Y., Fu, G., & Lee, K. (2015) Theory-of-Mind Training Causes Honest Young Children to Lie. Psychological Science, 26(11), 1812-1821. DOI: 10.1177/0956797615604628  

  • January 23, 2016
  • 10:06 PM
  • 178 views

Nanoparticles in Homeopathic Dilutions? More Like, Wishful Thinking. Or Magic Pixie Dust.

by Kausik Datta in In Scientio, Veritas (on Wordpress)

Those who read my regular posts (Yes, that rare breed of people…) are amply aware that I am no fan of pseudoscience and quackery, as well as the relentless invasion of quackery into academia, leading invariably to scientifically implausible, nonsensical “research”, for which Dr. Harriet Hall had aptly coined the term “Tooth Fairy Science” several […]... Read more »

  • January 21, 2016
  • 06:52 AM
  • 803 views

Will your paper be more cited if published in Open Access?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Is there any positive relationship between open access and the amount of citations? Last year Academia.edu announced in its website that citations to papers in its repository could raise in percentages much higher than other repositories. Is it truth or exaggeration? … Read More →... Read more »

  • January 17, 2016
  • 11:00 AM
  • 999 views

Week Two In Review: Open-Access Science | 11 to 17 Jan

by TakFurTheKaffe in Tak Fur The Kaffe

The world’s largest canyon discovered hidden under the Antarctic ice, citizen science is on the up, new genetic secrets of Ötzi Iceman, and the social lives of chimps. Here are 5 of the latest scientific studies published open-access this week.... Read more »

Jamieson, S., Ross, N., Greenbaum, J., Young, D., Aitken, A., Roberts, J., Blankenship, D., Bo, S., & Siegert, M. (2015) An extensive subglacial lake and canyon system in Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica. Geology. DOI: 10.1130/G37220.1  

Moeller, A., Foerster, S., Wilson, M., Pusey, A., Hahn, B., & Ochman, H. (2016) Social behavior shapes the chimpanzee pan-microbiome. Science Advances, 2(1). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1500997  

Coia, V., Cipollini, G., Anagnostou, P., Maixner, F., Battaggia, C., Brisighelli, F., Gómez-Carballa, A., Destro Bisol, G., Salas, A., & Zink, A. (2016) Whole mitochondrial DNA sequencing in Alpine populations and the genetic history of the Neolithic Tyrolean Iceman. Scientific Reports, 18932. DOI: 10.1038/srep18932  

Engelmann, J., & Herrmann, E. (2016) Chimpanzees Trust Their Friends. Current Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.11.037  

  • January 4, 2016
  • 12:56 PM
  • 696 views

ASCB15 – part 3

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

(part 1, part 2) I ended part 2 Monday night. It was an exciting day with many excellent talks, but the best talk (mine, of course!) was due the next day. Tuesday started with the seminar on engineering cells and … Continue reading →... Read more »

Hughes AJ, Spelke DP, Xu Z, Kang CC, Schaffer DV, & Herr AE. (2014) Single-cell western blotting. Nature methods, 11(7), 749-55. PMID: 24880876  

  • December 31, 2015
  • 04:10 AM
  • 955 views

ASCB15 – part 2

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

I ended Part 1 after the morning session on pushing the boundaries of imaging. After the amazing talks on imaging, I browsed the halls, visited some exhibitors, sampled a couple of exhibitor tech-talks. I later went to a mycrosymposium (#2: signaling … Continue reading →... Read more »

Smith C, Lari A, Derrer CP, Ouwehand A, Rossouw A, Huisman M, Dange T, Hopman M, Joseph A, Zenklusen D.... (2015) In vivo single-particle imaging of nuclear mRNA export in budding yeast demonstrates an essential role for Mex67p. The Journal of cell biology, 211(6), 1121-30. PMID: 26694837  

Nelles DA, Fang MY, Aigner S, & Yeo GW. (2015) Applications of Cas9 as an RNA-programmed RNA-binding protein. BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology, 37(7), 732-9. PMID: 25880497  

Vale RD. (2015) Accelerating scientific publication in biology. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(44), 13439-46. PMID: 26508643  

  • December 16, 2015
  • 01:10 PM
  • 829 views

Openness and quality of a published article

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Openness is a scientifically and societally relevant part of a published article's quality. It is time that openness is recognized as a most important element of the quality of a research publication and that those who judge researchers on their publications (e.g. tenure and promotion committees) take that into account. For the benefit of science and the benefit of society as a whole. … Read More →... Read more »

  • December 8, 2015
  • 02:50 PM
  • 763 views

Why is progress so slow in resuscitation research?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Why is progress so slow in resuscitation research? A lot of money and time went in to finding out which type of blood-letting ventilation works best – ignoring the absence of valid evidence that ventilation is better than no ventilation. Why not gamble with our patients?

In response to The Fatal Flaw in Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR,[1],[2] Kenny commented that –

there are many things in your blog that are not correct.[1]... Read more »

Nichol, G., Leroux, B., Wang, H., Callaway, C., Sopko, G., Weisfeldt, M., Stiell, I., Morrison, L., Aufderheide, T., Cheskes, S.... (2015) Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509139  

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