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  • April 28, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,454 views

Quicksilver: The Avenger With Mutations For Speed

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

The New Avengers movie comes out in a couple days. In this film, a new Avenger named Quicksilver makes his debut. Quicksilver is a mutant who can run fast – really fast. What mutation could make him that fast? Well, science has found several gene changes he might use to become a superhero.... Read more »

Reyes, N., Banks, G., Tsang, M., Margineantu, D., Gu, H., Djukovic, D., Chan, J., Torres, M., Liggitt, H., Hirenallur-S, D.... (2015) Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(2), 424-429. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1413021112  

Potter, M., Wyble, B., Hagmann, C., & McCourt, E. (2013) Detecting meaning in RSVP at 13 ms per picture. Attention, Perception, , 76(2), 270-279. DOI: 10.3758/s13414-013-0605-z  

  • April 25, 2015
  • 07:21 PM
  • 596 views

Leveraging Big Data to Accelerate Drug Discovery

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Neel S. Madhukar Graduate student in the lab of Olivier Elemento, PhD, Associate Professor Head, Laboratory of Cancer Systems Biology Department of Physiology and Biophysics Institute for Computational Biomedicine Weill Cornell Medical College Medical Research: What is … Continue reading →
The post Leveraging Big Data to Accelerate Drug Discovery appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical ........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:Neel S. MadhukarGraduate student in the lab of, & Olivier Elemento, PhD, Associate Professor. (2015) Leveraging Big Data to Accelerate Drug Discovery . MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • April 22, 2015
  • 11:37 PM
  • 846 views

Three tons of thyroid glands and a girl named Margaret Tracy: The odd origins of medications

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Drug discovery is a weird beast. These days, it's all about rational design, which means establishing a useful target in the body (e.g. an enzyme that does something that you'd like to stop or at least slow down) and then screening a truckload of chemicals for the best fit. A more traditional approach to drug discovery is to isolate and characterize chemicals present in plants of known medicinal value (e.g. morphine from the opium poppy). Then there is your classic scientific curiosity coupled w........ Read more »

  • April 7, 2015
  • 11:36 PM
  • 1,178 views

The unpleasant muddiness of crudely purified antibiotics

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Many antibiotics, being the products of microorganisms, can be manufactured by growing the appropriate bacterium or fungus in tanks filled with nutrient-amended broth. Provided that the proper incubation conditions are established, the microbe will happily eat up the broth, multiply to a tremendous degree, and synthesize and release the antibiotic into its liquid surroundings. From there, it is necessary to isolate the antibiotic from a soup of microbes, broth ingredients, and other microbial pr........ Read more »

Fraser I. (1984) Penicillin: early trials in war casualties. British medical journal, 289(6460), 1723-5. PMID: 6440621  

Levine D. (2006) Vancomycin: A History. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 42(Supplement 1). DOI: 10.1086/491709  

  • March 31, 2015
  • 06:23 AM
  • 1,204 views

Fixing 'leaky' blood vessels to combat severe respiratory ailments and, perhaps, Ebola

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

When you get an infection, your immune system responds with an influx of inflammatory cells that target the underlying bacteria or viruses. These immune cells migrate from your blood into the infected tissue in order to release a cocktail of pro-inflammatory proteins and help eliminate the infectious threat. During this inflammatory response, the blood vessel barrier becomes “leaky.” This allows for an even more rapid influx of additional immune cells. Once the infection resolves, th........ Read more »

Gong, H., Rehman, J., Tang, H., Wary, K., Mittal, M., Chatturvedi, P., Zhao, Y., Komorova, Y., Vogel, S., & Malik, A. (2015) HIF2α signaling inhibits adherens junctional disruption in acute lung injury. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 125(2), 652-664. DOI: 10.1172/JCI77701  

  • February 11, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,058 views

Thinking Skinny Thoughts Won’t Help

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

As with so many other things, we learn biology best by studying what happens when things go wrong. You won’t believe the diseases that are being linked to this most innocuous of cell structures. Without any exaggeration, primary cilia make you smart, skinny, and happy. Let’s find out how.... Read more »

Tong, C., Han, Y., Shah, J., Obernier, K., Guinto, C., & Alvarez-Buylla, A. (2014) Primary cilia are required in a unique subpopulation of neural progenitors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(34), 12438-12443. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1321425111  

Han, Y., Kang, G., Byun, K., Ko, H., Kim, J., Shin, M., Kim, H., Gil, S., Yu, J., Lee, B.... (2014) Leptin-promoted cilia assembly is critical for normal energy balance. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 124(5), 2193-2197. DOI: 10.1172/JCI69395  

Davenport JR, Watts AJ, Roper VC, Croyle MJ, van Groen T, Wyss JM, Nagy TR, Kesterson RA, & Yoder BK. (2007) Disruption of intraflagellar transport in adult mice leads to obesity and slow-onset cystic kidney disease. Current biology : CB, 17(18), 1586-94. PMID: 17825558  

Keryer, G., Pineda, J., Liot, G., Kim, J., Dietrich, P., Benstaali, C., Smith, K., Cordelières, F., Spassky, N., Ferrante, R.... (2011) Ciliogenesis is regulated by a huntingtin-HAP1-PCM1 pathway and is altered in Huntington disease. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 121(11), 4372-4382. DOI: 10.1172/JCI57552  

Miyoshi, K., Kasahara, K., Miyazaki, I., & Asanuma, M. (2009) Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 388(4), 757-762. DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2009.08.099  

  • February 4, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,280 views

An Immovable Moving Part- That’s Just Cilia!

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Nothing is simple, and we wouldn’t want it that way. The cilia on cells; they’re for propelling a cell forward or back, or for moving fluid past the cell. Unless they don’t move at all. Could a broken cilium be important to us? You bet, they control every part of our lives. And some aren’t even cilia; sterocilia are made completely differently, but the diseases of cilia affect sterocilia as well – they can make you blind, deaf and unbalanced.... Read more »

  • February 3, 2015
  • 09:05 AM
  • 1,375 views

Tryin' To Make A Tricorder

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Star Trek technology is coming true; modern medicine has borrowed the idea of the tricorder. There’s currently a $10 million X Prize to produce a working model. The goal is take doctors out of the picture and allow consumers to assess their own health status. To win the money, ten teams have developed hand held devices that can diagnose 16 diseases and monitor half a dozen vital signs in real time. ... Read more »

  • January 27, 2015
  • 08:30 AM
  • 1,488 views

Star Date: Pretty Darn Soon

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Star Trek celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2016. In preparation for the celebrations, we’re checking in on how close we are to making Star Trek technology a reality. The replicator made food and recycled trash, and later was used to make parts for the Enterprise. A machine fabricated what they needed on the spot. We have that now on the space station! Do you know how 3-D printing works and how we print parts, food, and even living tissue? Here’s how.... Read more »

  • January 26, 2015
  • 10:21 PM
  • 687 views

High-Dose Statin May Protect Heart Surgery Patients’ Kidney Health

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Health Sciences

Acute kidney injury often arises after major surgery because the kidneys can be deprived of normal blood flow during the procedure. The use of contrast media, or dyes, can contribute to this problem. In patients undergoing coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention, which are heart procedures that use dyes to help surgeons visualize the arteries, a high dose of the statin atorvastatin was linked with a reduction in blood levels of creatinine, a marker of kidney injury, as well as........ Read more »

  • January 21, 2015
  • 08:45 AM
  • 1,123 views

Evolving A Second Job

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Centrioles are the most amazing structures in your cell. They don’t have DNA, yet they duplicate to form more of themselves or they can form spontaneously if lost. They control the beating direction of the cell’s cilia; change one’s direction and all of the cells for hundreds of generations will remain moving in the wrong direction.... Read more »

Henderson, B., & Martin, A. (2014) Protein moonlighting: a new factor in biology and medicine. Biochemical Society Transactions, 42(6), 1671-1678. DOI: 10.1042/BST20140273  

Kobayashi, T., & Dynlacht, B. (2011) Regulating the transition from centriole to basal body. The Journal of Cell Biology, 193(3), 435-444. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201101005  

Debec, A., Sullivan, W., & Bettencourt-Dias, M. (2010) Centrioles: active players or passengers during mitosis?. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 67(13), 2173-2194. DOI: 10.1007/s00018-010-0323-9  

Boisvieux-Ulrich E, & Sandoz D. (1991) Determination of ciliary polarity precedes differentiation in the epithelial cells of quail oviduct. Biology of the cell / under the auspices of the European Cell Biology Organization, 72(1-2), 3-14. PMID: 1756309  

  • January 16, 2015
  • 07:10 AM
  • 1,710 views

Fixing ‘Leaky’ Blood Vessels in Severe Respiratory Ailments and Ebola

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

When you get an infection, your immune system responds with an influx of inflammatory cells that target the underlying bacteria or viruses. These immune cells migrate from your blood into the infected tissue in order to release a cocktail of pro-inflammatory proteins and help eliminate the infectious threat.

During this inflammatory response, the blood vessel barrier becomes “leaky.” This allows for an even more rapid influx of additional immune cells. Once the infection resolves,........ Read more »

Gong, H., Rehman, J., Tang, H., Wary, K., Mittal, M., Chatturvedi, P., Zhao, Y., Komorova, Y., Vogel, S., & Malik, A. (2015) HIF2α signaling inhibits adherens junctional disruption in acute lung injury. Journal of Clinical Investigation. DOI: 10.1172/JCI77701  

  • January 14, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,233 views

Everybody In The Gene Pool - Plants That Swim

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Plants can be moved by wind and water. Their pollen and seeds can be moved by insects, wind, gravity, but plants themselves don't have motile cells. Well – that’s not always true. Some trees have swimming cells; they take the plunge in order to find a mate.... Read more »

  • December 23, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 933 views

One Myrrh-aculous Christmas Gift

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

The three wise men made a gift of myrrh, knowing it was an important incense, embalming agent, and anti-microbial. What they didn’t know is that 2000 years later we would find that constituents of myrrh would be important in curing cancer.... Read more »

  • December 17, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 987 views

Christmas Greenery - Friend Or Foe?

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Your Christmas tree can kill you, but it can also save your life. The same holds true for mistletoe, ivy, and holly. Each is toxic, but each has uses in medicine. The least toxic Christmas plant is the most often thought of as poisonous – poinsettias really aren’t that bad, kids would have to eat 500 leaves to bring on the nastiest effects.... Read more »

  • December 13, 2014
  • 12:56 PM
  • 1,264 views

Animal Research Sheds Light on Harmful Mood Disorders in New Mothers

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

In the days shortly after giving birth, most mothers experience a period of increased calmness and decreased stress responses, but around 20% of mothers experience anxiety. Some women may become depressed, and around one in a thousand can develop psychosis. The latest evidence indicates that these distressing responses to motherhood are still poorly understood, but that animal research could provide valuable clues to their causes.

Writing in the British Journal of Pharmacology, Dr David Slatt........ Read more »

Perani, C., & Slattery, D. (2014) Using animal models to study post-partum psychiatric disorders. British Journal of Pharmacology, 171(20), 4539-4555. DOI: 10.1111/bph.12640  

  • December 9, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,030 views

Winter Gives Me The Shakes

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Your body has several mechanisms to protect you from the cold – and some are just plain weird. You can trap air next to your body just like when your cat hisses and all his fur stands on end. Adults can shiver, but babies can generate heat without shivering. What’s more, adults can learn to act like babies - it will help them stay warm and lose weight!... Read more »

Torkamani, N., Jones, L., Rufaut, N., & Sinclair, R. (2014) Beyond goosebumps: Does the arrector pili muscle have a role in hair loss?. International Journal of Trichology, 6(3), 88. DOI: 10.4103/0974-7753.139077  

Jiménez-Aranda, A., Fernández-Vázquez, G., Campos, D., Tassi, M., Velasco-Perez, L., Tan, D., Reiter, R., & Agil, A. (2013) Melatonin induces browning of inguinal white adipose tissue in Zucker diabetic fatty rats. Journal of Pineal Research. DOI: 10.1111/jpi.12089  

Lim, S., Honek, J., Xue, Y., Seki, T., Cao, Z., Andersson, P., Yang, X., Hosaka, K., & Cao, Y. (2012) Cold-induced activation of brown adipose tissue and adipose angiogenesis in mice. Nature Protocols, 7(3), 606-615. DOI: 10.1038/nprot.2012.013  

Bi, S., & Li, L. (2013) Browning of white adipose tissue: role of hypothalamic signaling. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1302(1), 30-34. DOI: 10.1111/nyas.12258  

  • December 9, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,003 views

Winter Gives Me The Shakes

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Your body has several mechanisms to protect you from the cold – and some are just plain weird. You can trap air next to your body just like when your cat hisses and all his fur stands on end. Adults can shiver, but babies can generate heat without shivering. What’s more, adults can learn to act like babies - it will help them stay warm and lose weight!... Read more »

Torkamani, N., Jones, L., Rufaut, N., & Sinclair, R. (2014) Beyond goosebumps: Does the arrector pili muscle have a role in hair loss?. International Journal of Trichology, 6(3), 88. DOI: 10.4103/0974-7753.139077  

Jiménez-Aranda, A., Fernández-Vázquez, G., Campos, D., Tassi, M., Velasco-Perez, L., Tan, D., Reiter, R., & Agil, A. (2013) Melatonin induces browning of inguinal white adipose tissue in Zucker diabetic fatty rats. Journal of Pineal Research. DOI: 10.1111/jpi.12089  

Lim, S., Honek, J., Xue, Y., Seki, T., Cao, Z., Andersson, P., Yang, X., Hosaka, K., & Cao, Y. (2012) Cold-induced activation of brown adipose tissue and adipose angiogenesis in mice. Nature Protocols, 7(3), 606-615. DOI: 10.1038/nprot.2012.013  

Bi, S., & Li, L. (2013) Browning of white adipose tissue: role of hypothalamic signaling. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1302(1), 30-34. DOI: 10.1111/nyas.12258  

  • December 2, 2014
  • 07:55 AM
  • 1,272 views

In Winter, Frozen Isn't Just A Disney Movie

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Everyone knows that you can dies from being out in the cold for too long, but do you how the cold can bring about your demise? It has to do with water, electricity, and believe it or not, stripping.... Read more »

Palmers PJ, Hiltrop N, Ameloot K, Timmermans P, Ferdinande B, Sinnaeve P, Nieuwendijk R, & Malbrain ML. (2014) From therapeutic hypothermia towards targeted temperature management: a decade of evolution. Anaesthesiology intensive therapy. PMID: 25421924  

Argacha, J., Adamopoulos, D., Gujic, M., Fontaine, D., Amyai, N., Berkenboom, G., & van de Borne, P. (2008) Acute Effects of Passive Smoking on Peripheral Vascular Function. Hypertension, 51(6), 1506-1511. DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.107.104059  

Adams MD, Earnhardt JT, Dewey WL, & Harris LS. (1976) Vasoconstrictor actions of delta8- and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the rat. The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, 196(3), 649-56. PMID: 4606  

  • November 29, 2014
  • 04:40 AM
  • 1,227 views

This Month in Blastocystis Research (NOV 2014): Blasting Blastocystis Edition

by Christen Rune Stensvold in Blastocystis Parasite Blog

A few notes on deliberate and inadvertent attempts to eradicate Blastocystis.... Read more »

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