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  • March 8, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 143 views

A secret weapon for voir dire: Smart people are more curious

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Back in October of 2016, we wrote about a paper by the Cultural Cognition Project on assessing “scientific curiosity”. Here is some of what we said then about what Kahan and his colleagues found by measuring scientific curiosity: “What they found was that participants who scored higher on the curiosity scale were more likely to […]... Read more »

  • February 24, 2017
  • 02:30 PM
  • 193 views

Irresistible: Emotions affect choice of breed despite welfare issues

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Knowing a breed of dog may have health problems does not stop people from wanting one, because emotions get in the way. A new Danish study by Peter S Sandøe (University of Copenhagen) et al investigates the reasons why people acquire particular small breeds of dog and how attached the owners feel to their pet. The research helps explain why some breeds are popular despite a high incidence of welfare problems. The study looked at people in Denmark with French Bulldogs, Chihuahuas, Cava........ Read more »

Sandøe P,, Kondrup SV,, Bennett PC,, Forkman B,, Meyer I,, Proschowsky HF,, Serpell, JA,, & Lund, TB. (2017) Why do people buy dogs with potential welfare problems related to extreme conformation and inherited disease? A representative study of Danish owners of four small dog breeds. . PLOSOne. info:/

  • January 15, 2017
  • 07:04 AM
  • 314 views

What Differential-K Theory gets Wrong about Race Differences in Sexuality

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

This post critiques a study that attempted to test predictions of differential-K theory about racial differences in sexuality using data from a Durex condom survey. Better, more scientific data addresses this topic, and fails to confirm the predictions of this theory.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • January 15, 2017
  • 06:05 AM
  • 281 views

Population Differences in Androgens Fail to Validate Richard Lynn's Claims about Racial Differences in Penis Size

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

The author of a study on population differences in androgens claimed that his findings support Lynn's claims about racial differences in penis length. Close analysis of the statistics used shows these conclusions are invalid.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • December 31, 2016
  • 07:13 AM
  • 340 views

Population Differences in Androgens Fail to Support Differential-K Theory

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

A recent paper attempts to test predictions of Differential-K Theory about race differences using data on population differences in androgens.Close examination of this data shows that the predictions fail.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • December 19, 2016
  • 08:43 AM
  • 375 views

I am morally superior to others and also less biased than  everyone….

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

While you may think you have heard this line recently, this is really (based on new research) what most of us think about ourselves. It is called the “better than average effect” and it is very persistent. We might smirk at politicians who actually say things like this aloud, but that’s only because we tend […]... Read more »

  • December 6, 2016
  • 08:46 AM
  • 342 views

Are American Professors More Responsive to Requests Made by White Male Students?

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

The vast majority of professors will gladly meet a prospective graduate student and discuss research opportunities as well as long-term career options, especially if the student requesting the meeting clarifies the goal of the meeting. However, there are cases when students wait in vain for a response. Is it because their email never reached the professor because it got lost in the internet ether or a spam folder? Was the professor simply too busy to respond? A research study headed by Katherine........ Read more »

  • October 28, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 355 views

Choosing your jurors: On bias, curiosity and  wisdom

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Earlier this week, we wrote on the question of whether those who have a higher score on the Need for Cognition Scale are just lazy (and the answer was no, not really). If you read this blog regularly, you know that bias is where we work and focus. We also like a curious juror (sometimes) […]

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Uncommon Wisdom: Lessons from Patent and IP  Mock Jurors
Choosing to either disgust your jurors or tick them off
Choosing science over beliefs: Frequency of dog bites and feelings of........ Read more »

Kahn, Landrum, Carpenter, Helft, & Jameson. (2016) Science curiosity and political information processing. . Advances in Political Psychology. info:/

  • August 12, 2016
  • 06:52 AM
  • 586 views

Discovering a glaring error in a research paper – a personal account

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

New York Magazine has published a great article about how grad student Steven Ludeke tried to correct mistakes in the research of Pete Hatemi and Brad Verhulst. Overall, Ludeke summarises his experience as ‘not recommendable’. Back in my undergraduate years I spotted an error in an article by David DeMatteo and did little to correct it. […]... Read more »

  • March 29, 2016
  • 10:01 AM
  • 1,098 views

Nostalgia is a Muse

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

This view has been challenged by the University of Southampton researchers Constantine Sedikides and Tim Wildschut, who have spent the past decade studying the benefits of nostalgia. Not only do they disavow its disease status, they have conducted numerous studies which suggest that nostalgia can make us more creative, open-minded and charitable. The definition of nostalgia used by Sedikides and Wildschut as a "sentimental longing for one's past" is based on the contemporary usage........ Read more »

  • March 16, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 740 views

”Willful ignorance” and the denigration of others 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

A while back we wrote about meat-eaters denigrating vegetarians. Apparently it is more common than one might think to make fun of “do-gooders” if you are not a “do-gooder” yourself. Today we are examining research on making fun of those who shop ethically. According to the researchers (from Ohio State University’s marketing department and UT […]

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Does the Millennial know that tattoo might be a business  faux pas?
“I am so tired of people mistaking me for a mode........ Read more »

  • March 11, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 717 views

Bad brains and bad behavior: A primer for the attorney 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Neurocriminology, say the authors of today’s paper, is “the study of the brain and how it affects antisocial behavior”. When neurocriminology comes to the courtroom, we call it neurolaw and we have blogged about this intersection between neurosciences and law for years. The paper we are posting about today is meant as a primer on […]

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A new question for the jury: Did my brain implant make me do it?
Does priming influence behavior of even the “bad boys”?
On brains........ Read more »

Jorgensen, C., Anderson, N., & Barnes, J. (2016) Bad Brains: Crime and Drug Abuse from a Neurocriminological Perspective. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 41(1), 47-69. DOI: 10.1007/s12103-015-9328-0  

  • November 27, 2015
  • 10:45 PM
  • 809 views

A Treatise on the Physics and Psychology of Heavy Metal Music

by Amiya Sarkar in Physiology physics woven fine

A rather panoramic view of the heavy metal arena encompassing various aspects of science and psychology. ... Read more »

Jesse L. Silverberg, Matthew Bierbaum, James P. Sethna, & Itai Cohen. (2013) Collective Motion of Moshers at Heavy Metal Concerts. 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.228701. arXiv: 1302.1886v1

  • October 5, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 585 views

Is there an effective strategy that reduces a conspiracy  theorist’s intense beliefs?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

According to new research with a large sample from all across the United States, the answer is yes! If you have read this blog for long, you know we love a good conspiracy theorist and use their idiosyncratic associations in pretrial research to plug holes in case narratives. The researchers briefly review the past literature […]

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Conspiracy beliefs and the relation to emotional uncertainty
Would you get sucked in to conspiracy theories?
Think conspiracy theorists live on ........ Read more »

  • August 10, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,012 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Do you follow your head or your heart?  

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

And….do you think I can now guess your opinion on abortion? And brain death? It’s like a dream-state voir dire question. Today’s researchers used 8 different studies to explore the relationship between participants identifying with either the head or the heart and the participants’ positions on various hot-button issues. It’s a question that has been […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: When your Muslim female client wears a head-covering
Simple Jury Persuasion: Tilt your........ Read more »

Adam, H, Obodaru, O, & Galinsky, AD. (2015) Who you are is where you are: Antecedents and con sequencing of locating the self in the brain or the heart. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 74-83. info:/

  • August 3, 2015
  • 06:25 AM
  • 405 views

What your taste in music says about how you think

by TakFurTheKaffe in Tak Fur The Kaffe

Empathetic personalities tend to opt for gentle and sensual music, whilst the more analytical types preferred strong, intense tunes, new research shows.... Read more »

Greenberg DM, Baron-Cohen S, Stillwell DJ, Kosinski M, & Rentfrow PJ. (2015) Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles. PloS one, 10(7). PMID: 26200656  

  • July 8, 2015
  • 08:30 AM
  • 1,123 views

Six Ways to Entertain Your Dog Indoors

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

When walks are limited, these ideas will help you tire out your dog.Lately my dogs have been getting fewer walks due to unusually hot weather and smoke from forest fires. You can beat the heat by walking in the early morning or late evening, and sometimes there is better air quality just down the road. But there are times when there’s no choice but to limit walks. Then what do you do? These ideas will help you to entertain your dog. Feed Your Dog CreativelyYour dog’s food does not have to ar........ Read more »

  • June 28, 2015
  • 03:33 AM
  • 747 views

What personality features do heroes and psychopaths have in common?

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

The search for a positive face of psychopathy prompted a study examining whether psychopaths and heroes share certain personality traits. Both psychopathy and heroism were correlated with a history of antisocial behavior, but the reasons for this remain unclear. Heroes might have more mature personalities than psychopaths, in spite of what features they may have in common. ... Read more »

  • May 28, 2015
  • 05:01 PM
  • 1,054 views

Why does humanity get smarter and smarter?

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Intelligence tests have to be adjusted all the time because people score higher and higher. If the average human of today went 105 years back in time, s/he would score 130, be considered as gifted, and join clubs for highly intelligent people. How can that be? The IQ growth The picture above shows the development […]... Read more »

Pietschnig J, & Voracek M. (2015) One Century of Global IQ Gains: A Formal Meta-Analysis of the Flynn Effect (1909-2013). Perspectives on psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, 10(3), 282-306. PMID: 25987509  

  • March 9, 2015
  • 08:58 AM
  • 2,355 views

“She’s strong for a girl”: The Negative Impact of Stereotypes About Women

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

We have all heard the stereotypes: women can’t drive, they don’t understand computers, and how many blondes does it take to screw in a light bulb? But those are all in good fun, right? But what if gender stereotypes actually bring about the observed differences between men and women that supposedly underline these stereotypes? A recent study by the psychologist Marina Pavlova at the University of Tübingen tested this idea.... Read more »

Pavlova, M., Weber, S., Simoes, E., & Sokolov, A. (2014) Gender Stereotype Susceptibility. PLoS ONE, 9(12). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0114802  

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