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All posts; Tags Include "Medical Ethics"

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  • September 26, 2009
  • 10:48 AM
  • 2,054 views

does alt med equal fewer vaccinations?

by Greg Fish in weird things

Did you know that the state of Washington requires insurance companies to cover alternative medicine under a special provision that requires them to compensate all types of medical care? Heh. Forget what I said in my post about why alternative medicine faces a long shot at being covered by insurance companies. Science by damned when [...]... Read more »

  • September 22, 2009
  • 02:58 PM
  • 1,803 views

When Pseudoscience Kills – Trust, Denialism, and Peter Duesberg

by colinhockings in Blue Genes

– This is a guest post written for Blue-Genes by Ben Vincent. He will be back regularly with more on HIV/AIDS
For scientists working in the field of HIV and AIDS, discussion of denialists can be at best tiring and at worst infuriating. This isn’t because a (‘good’) scientist can’t engage in a meaningful debate [...]... Read more »

Ascher, M., Sheppard, H., Jr, W., & Vittinghoff, E. (1993) Does drug use cause AIDS?. Nature, 362(6416), 103-104. DOI: 10.1038/362103a0  

  • September 18, 2009
  • 06:39 PM
  • 1,797 views

Professional obligations versus personal ethics: what doctors think

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

In the last post, I reported on a study into whether religious people are more likely to support the Supreme Court to judge matters of right and wrong. Apparently they are. This is in line with the well-known fact that religious people are more likely to have authoritarian natures.But it doesn't necessarily follow that religious people are more likely to obey authorities if those authorities are religious. There's some good evidence of this from studies of physicians. The most recent has just b........ Read more »

Lawrence RE, & Curlin FA. (2009) Physicians' beliefs about conscience in medicine: a national survey. Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 84(9), 1276-82. PMID: 19707071  

  • September 8, 2009
  • 03:31 AM
  • 1,888 views

Empathy during Medical Education

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


There is a significant decline in empathy occurs during the third year of medical school. This decline occurs during a time when the curriculum is shifting toward patient-care activities.

There is a significant decline in empathy during third year of medical school, regardless of gender or specialty interest.
Every year women scored significantly higher than men.This seems [...]... Read more »

  • July 27, 2009
  • 07:00 AM
  • 1,645 views

Elective fertility cryo-preservation instigates debate in the Netherlands

by Rense Nieuwenhuis in Curving Normality

New technology has that unique property of creating fascinating moral debates, which is especially so when it relates to new technology regarding life, death, or in this case: fertility. For a few years, technology has been available for the cryo-preservation of oocytes or ovarian tissue, which is used to help save the fertility of women who run the risk of losing it, for instance due to chemotherapy. Now, the question is raised whether such techniques should be made available to healthy women a........ Read more »

  • July 3, 2009
  • 12:21 PM
  • 1,558 views

Chiropractic and ethics in the BJGP

by Euan in Dr Euan Lawson

The regular half page advert for the General Chiropractic Council appears in the BJGP as usual this month.

I am sure there is little or no editorial control over the advertising in a journal but I couldn’t help but notice that this month their advert is plastered directly opposite Prof Ernst’s article: ‘Ethics of complementary medicine: [...]... Read more »

Ernst, E. (2009) Ethics of complementary medicine: practical issues. British Journal of General Practice, 59(564), 517-519. DOI: 10.3399/bjgp09x453404  

Buckley, B. (2009) Commentary: Conventional medicine is less than perfect. British Journal of General Practice, 59(564), 519-519. DOI: 10.3399/bjgp09x453558  

  • June 26, 2009
  • 09:39 AM
  • 1,652 views

Antibiotic eating European monkeys

by Euan in Dr Euan Lawson

No doctor likes to think that they are the one who is giving out all these antibiotics to viral illnesses. There is always someone else at fault. Partners blame locums. Locums blame nurses. Everyone blames the patients. Me? I blame the French. They have shamelessly flung antibiotics around for years with Gallic abandon. According to a PLOS paper more than 70 [...]... Read more »

  • June 4, 2009
  • 12:11 PM
  • 1,971 views

Autism, Vaccines, and The Oprah Effect

by Susan Steinhardt in BioData Blogs

... Read more »

WAKEFIELD, A., MURCH, S., ANTHONY, A., LINNELL, J., CASSON, D., MALIK, M., BERELOWITZ, M., DHILLON, A., THOMSON, M., & HARVEY, P. (1998) Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. The Lancet, 351(9103), 637-641. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(97)11096-0  

  • June 4, 2009
  • 12:11 PM
  • 1,577 views

Autism, Vaccines, and the Oprah Effect

by Susan Steinhardt in The PostDoc Forum

Oprah Winfrey is The Media Queen. On the air for over twenty years, Oprah’s self-named syndicated talk show has roughly forty million viewers weekly. Aside from her television success, the media mogul has a steady monthly following of 2 million readers for her O magazine, has her own satellite radio channel, and an extremely popular Web site. Oprah’s personal fortune has been estimated by Forbes to be $2.7 billion – and yet her media empire is continuing to grow. Oprah recently........ Read more »

WAKEFIELD, A., MURCH, S., ANTHONY, A., LINNELL, J., CASSON, D., MALIK, M., BERELOWITZ, M., DHILLON, A., THOMSON, M., & HARVEY, P. (1998) Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. The Lancet, 351(9103), 637-641. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(97)11096-0  

  • May 10, 2009
  • 11:40 PM
  • 1,255 views

Holoprosencephaly and Cephalocentesis: an Overview

by Whitecoat Tales in Beyond the Short Coat

This is a very brief discussion of Holoprosencephaly, and a similarly brief discussion on cephalocentesis, and it’s role in OBGYN. Both holoprosencephaly and cephalocentesis could be considered disturbing, if your sensibilities are easily offended, don’t read this post.

 It’s hard to call Holoprosencephaly one defect. It’s a spectrum of congenital defects in midline structures of the [...]... Read more »

  • March 19, 2009
  • 12:44 AM
  • 1,772 views

Religious Coping and Aggressiveness of Medical Care at the End of Life

by Thomas Quinn, APRN, CHPN in Pallimed: a Hospice & Palliative Medicine Blog

I'm expecting a lot of discussion about this study in the current issue of JAMA, "Religious coping and use of intensive life-prolonging care near death in patients with advanced cancer." Religious coping is defined as "how a patient makes use of his or her religious beliefs to understand and adapt to stress." Previous studies have shown that people with high positive religious coping are more likely to have preferences for aggressive life-prolonging treatment and less likely to have advance di........ Read more »

Andrea C. Phelps, Paul K. Maciejewski, Matthew Nilsson, Tracy A. Balboni, Alexi A. Wright, M. Elizabeth Paulk, Elizabeth Trice, Deborah Schrag, John R. Peteet, Susan D. Block.... (2009) Religious Coping and Use of Intensive Life-Prolonging Care Near Death in Patients With Advanced Cancer. JAMA, 341(11), 1140-1147. DOI: http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/301/11/1140  

  • March 15, 2009
  • 03:27 PM
  • 2,048 views

JAMA editor DeAngelis is actually Joe Pesci, circa Goodfellas

by Danny McCaslin in The Phrenologist's Notebook

Okay, my hiatus is over. Class is finished, and I’ve got three weeks to kill with work, blogging, and playing Lego Batman because I’m just that kind of geek.

Of course, the first blog I check when I come back is Mind Hacks, because it is one of the best psychology blogs out there, and I [...]... Read more »

Lacasse, J., & Leo, J. (2008) Escitalopram, Problem-Solving Therapy, and Poststroke Depression. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 300(15), 1757-1758. DOI: 10.1001/jama.300.15.1757-c  

Robinson, R., Jorge, R., Moser, D., Acion, L., Solodkin, A., Small, S., Fonzetti, P., Hegel, M., & Arndt, S. (2008) Escitalopram and Problem-Solving Therapy for Prevention of Poststroke Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 299(20), 2391-2400. DOI: 10.1001/jama.299.20.2391  

Robinson, R., Jorge, R., & Arndt, S. (2008) Escitalopram, Problem-Solving Therapy, and Poststroke Depression--Reply. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 300(15), 1758-1759. DOI: 10.1001/jama.300.15.1758-b  

  • February 7, 2009
  • 10:12 PM
  • 2,784 views

Scientific Misconduct and the Autism-MMR Vaccine Link

by Mike Dunford in The Questionable Authority

A series of articles just published in The Sunday Times is reporting that it appears likely that Andrew Wakefield falsified much of the data that was used in the 1998 Lancet article that first identified the MMR vaccine as a potential cause of autism. If the charges leveled by the paper are remotely accurate, Wakefield is guilty of homicide - if not legally, then certainly morally. If previous accusations made by the paper are accurate, the homicide may have been committed for financial gain.

........ Read more »

A WAKEFIELD, S MURCH, A ANTHONY, J LINNELL, D CASSON, M MALIK, M BERELOWITZ, A DHILLON, M THOMSON, & P HARVEY. (1998) Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. The Lancet, 351(9103), 637-641. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(97)11096-0  

  • January 22, 2009
  • 11:43 PM
  • 1,741 views

Knock! Knock!Hi, It's the Office of Inspector General

by Pallimed Bloggers in Pallimed: a Hospice & Palliative Medicine Blog

Imagine a nurse in the ICU raises concerns about possible euthanasia by staff in the ICU. You might think it may first go to the ethics committee, the hospital board, and likely the legal department. Then imagine if the Feds (Office of Inspector General) get involved and conduct a complete investigation into the allegations of hastened death. Really. Just imagine it happening to you.Makes answering, "Hey honey, how was your day?" seem impossible.Now imagine someone in your department says, "........ Read more »

  • August 22, 2008
  • 12:46 AM
  • 2,139 views

How Representative are Volunteers?

by Neural Outlaw in Neural Interface

As if by magic, another item at the BPS Research Digest which is also relevant to my recent forays discusses the question of whether participants in psychology studies are "representative" of the total sample under review. It seems like the majority of those who take part in psychology studies are generally more "stable and outgoing", which begs questions about whether said studies are reliable in their testing of depression measures, for example.To give some background, the popular five-factor ........ Read more »

Jan-Erik Lönnqvist, Sampo Paunonen, Markku Verkasalo, Sointu Leikas, Annamari Tuulio-Henriksson, & Jouko Lönnqvist. (2007) Personality characteristics of research volunteers. European Journal of Personality, 21(8), 1017-1030. DOI: 10.1002/per.655  

  • August 21, 2008
  • 12:11 AM
  • 2,620 views

How Clinical is Non-Clinical?

by Neural Outlaw in Neural Interface

So far in my budding career I've been involved in three psychology studies, all of which required the recruitment of non-clinical participants. Even before that, my psych undergraduate final-year project on schizophrenia was carried out by surveying non-clinical participants. For the benefit of lay readers, non-clinical participants refers to "normal" people who are recruited to take part in the study and are different to results gleaned from sufferers of psychosis, anxiety or oth........ Read more »

Idia B. Thurston, Jessica Curley, Sherecce Fields, Dimitra Kamboukos, Ariz Rojas, & Vicky Phares. (2008) How nonclinical are community samples?. Journal of Community Psychology, 36(4), 411-420. DOI: 10.1002/jcop.20223  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,448 views

More evidence that antibiotics are over-prescribed - How should that change?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Today Lancet Infectious Diseases posted an early release of an article that shows that the antibiotic amoxicillin still does not work on viruses.

Many doctors still routinely prescribe antibiotics for viral infections.

Bias, perhaps the biggest confounder in medical research, is controlled for very well.

What does the study show?... Read more »

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 803 views

The Fatal Flaw in Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This is not a study that has a valid control group to determine if there is any benefit from ventilation. There is no group that does not receive ventilations, so it is like a study of one type of blood-letting vs. another type of blood-letting with the researchers taking for granted that blood-letting does improve outcomes. That is not a problem if blood-letting actually improves outcomes.

Should we take it for granted that blood-letting improves outcomes and that the only hypothesis worth s........ Read more »

Nichol, G., Leroux, B., Wang, H., Callaway, C., Sopko, G., Weisfeldt, M., Stiell, I., Morrison, L., Aufderheide, T., Cheskes, S.... (2015) Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509139  

Alldredge BK,, Gelb AM,, Isaacs SM,, Corry MD,, Allen F,, Ulrich S,, Gottwald MD,, O’Neil N,, Neuhaus JM,, Segal MR,.... (2001) A Comparison of Lorazepam, Diazepam, and Placebo for the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Status Epilepticus. New England Journal of Medicine, 345(25), 1860-1860. DOI: 10.1056/NEJM200112203452521  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,492 views

The Fatal Flaw in Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This is not a study that has a valid control group to determine if there is any benefit from ventilation. There is no group that does not receive ventilations, so it is like a study of one type of blood-letting vs. another type of blood-letting with the researchers taking for granted that blood-letting does improve outcomes. That is not a problem if blood-letting actually improves outcomes.

Should we take it for granted that blood-letting improves outcomes and that the only hypothesis worth s........ Read more »

Nichol, G., Leroux, B., Wang, H., Callaway, C., Sopko, G., Weisfeldt, M., Stiell, I., Morrison, L., Aufderheide, T., Cheskes, S.... (2015) Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509139  

Alldredge BK,, Gelb AM,, Isaacs SM,, Corry MD,, Allen F,, Ulrich S,, Gottwald MD,, O’Neil N,, Neuhaus JM,, Segal MR,.... (2001) A Comparison of Lorazepam, Diazepam, and Placebo for the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Status Epilepticus. New England Journal of Medicine, 345(25), 1860-1860. DOI: 10.1056/NEJM200112203452521  

  • November 30, -1
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,316 views

The PROCAMIO Trial – IV Procainamide vs IV Amiodarone for the Acute Treatment of Stable Wide Complex Tachycardia

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This is a very interesting trial that may surprise the many outspoken amiodarone advocates, but it should not surprise anyone who pays attention to research.

ALPS showed that we should stop giving amiodarone for unwitnessed shockable cardiac arrest. The lead researcher is still trying to spin amiodarone for witnessed shockable cardiac arrest, even though the results do not show improvement in the one outcome that matters – leaving the hospital with a brain that still works.[1],[2],[3]... Read more »

Kudenchuk PJ, Brown SP, Daya M, Rea T, Nichol G, Morrison LJ, Leroux B, Vaillancourt C, Wittwer L, Callaway CW.... (2016) Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. The New England journal of medicine, 374(18), 1711-22. PMID: 27043165  

Marill KA, deSouza IS, Nishijima DK, Senecal EL, Setnik GS, Stair TO, Ruskin JN, & Ellinor PT. (2010) Amiodarone or procainamide for the termination of sustained stable ventricular tachycardia: an historical multicenter comparison. Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 17(3), 297-306. PMID: 20370763  

Marill KA, deSouza IS, Nishijima DK, Stair TO, Setnik GS, & Ruskin JN. (2006) Amiodarone is poorly effective for the acute termination of ventricular tachycardia. Annals of emergency medicine, 47(3), 217-24. PMID: 16492484  

Kułakowski P, Karczmarewicz S, Karpiński G, Soszyńska M, & Ceremuzyński L. (2000) Effects of intravenous amiodarone on ventricular refractoriness, intraventricular conduction, and ventricular tachycardia induction. Europace : European pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac electrophysiology : journal of the working groups on cardiac pacing, arrhythmias, and cardiac cellular electrophysiology of the European Society of Cardiology, 2(3), 207-15. PMID: 11227590  

Bonny A, De Sisti A, Márquez MF, Megbemado R, Hidden-Lucet F, & Fontaine G. (2012) Low doses of intravenous epinephrine for refractory sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. World journal of cardiology, 4(10), 296-301. PMID: 23110246  

Kowey PR. (1988) The calamity of cardioversion of conscious patients. The American journal of cardiology, 61(13), 1106-7. PMID: 3364364  

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