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  • January 11, 2013
  • 01:31 AM
  • 1,252 views

English for everyone is unfair

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Knowledge of English has come to be seen as the key talent of the 21st century, a way to perfect an individual’s character and to modernize societies; a central facet of global development. China, for instance, introduced an ambitious universal … Continue reading →... Read more »

Hu, G., & Alsagoff, L. (2010) A public policy perspective on English medium instruction in China. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 31(4), 365-382. DOI: 10.1080/01434632.2010.489950  

  • January 7, 2013
  • 08:12 PM
  • 1,170 views

Early study abroad students in young adulthood

by Bong Jeong Lee in Language on the Move

Readers of Language on the Move will be familiar with South Korea’s English fever, the sweeping zeal for learning English. Parents enrol children in English medium-preschools, arts and sports classes, nursery schools with native-speaking English staff, toddler gyms with English … Continue reading →... Read more »

Cummins, Jim. (2000) Language, power and pedagogy: bilingual children in the crossfire, . Multilingual Matters. info:/

  • January 3, 2013
  • 07:30 PM
  • 1,824 views

The exotic Chinese language

by Chen Xiaoxiao 陈潇潇 in Language on the Move

Ingrid’s blog post “Character challenge” has set me thinking about Chinese language learning these days. I have found her observation about learning Chinese characters as “the most intriguing pastime” particularly impressive, especially when I look again at the data I … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 14, 2012
  • 05:47 PM
  • 1,345 views

Lateralization of word and face processing

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

A few weeks ago I was at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society where, among other interesting talks, I heard a great one by Marlene Behrmann about her recent work showing that lateralization of visual word recognition drives lateralization of face recognition. Lateralization of word and face processing are among the most classic findings in cognitive neuroscience: in adults, regions in the inferior temporal lobe in the left hemisphere appear to be specialized for recognizing visual (i.e......... Read more »

  • November 14, 2012
  • 08:45 AM
  • 799 views

Is ambiguity dysfunctional for communicatively efficient systems?

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

Based on yesterday’s post, where I argued degeneracy emerges as a design solution for ambiguity pressures, a Reddit commentator pointed me to a cool paper by Piantadosi et al (2012) that contained the following quote: The natural approach has always been: Is [language] well designed for use, understood typically as use for communication? I think [...]... Read more »

  • November 13, 2012
  • 05:21 PM
  • 1,427 views

Chocolate Consumption, Traffic Accidents and Serial Killers

by Sean Roberts in A Replicated Typo 2.0

Last month there was a paper published about a correlation between chocolate consumption and Nobel Laureates. EDIT: I now see the article may not be accessible to everyone.  Here’s a summary: Messerli suggests that, because some flavinoids that are found in chocolate have been linked to improved cognition, one might expect a country that eats [...]... Read more »

  • November 13, 2012
  • 08:22 AM
  • 1,163 views

Degeneracy emerges as a design feature in response to ambiguity pressures

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

Two weeks ago my supervisor, Simon Kirby, gave a talk on some of the work that’s been going on in the LEC. Much of his talk focused on one of the key areas in language evolution research: the emergence of the basic design features that underpin language as a system of communication. He gave several [...]... Read more »

Edelman, G., & Gally, J. (2001) Degeneracy and complexity in biological systems. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 98(24), 13763-13768. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.231499798  

Ay, N., Flack, J., & Krakauer, D. (2007) Robustness and complexity co-constructed in multimodal signalling networks. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 362(1479), 441-447. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2006.1971  

Eduardo G. Altmann, Janet B. Pierrehumbert, & Adilson E. Motter. (2010) Niche as a determinant of word fate in online groups. PLoS ONE 6(5), e19009 (2011). arXiv: 1009.3321v2

  • November 12, 2012
  • 02:10 PM
  • 1,554 views

Complementary taxonomic and thematic semantic systems

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

I am happy to report that my paper with Kristen Graziano (a Research Assistant in my lab) showing cross-task individual differences in strength of taxonomic vs. thematic semantic relations is in this month's issue of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General (Mirman & Graziano, 2012a). This paper is part of a cluster of four articles developing the idea that there is a functional and neural dissociation between taxonomic and thematic semantic systems in the human brain.  First, so........ Read more »

Mirman D., & Graziano K.M. (2012) Individual differences in the strength of taxonomic versus thematic relations. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 141(4), 601-609. PMID: 22201413  

Schwartz M.F., Kimberg D.Y., Walker G.M., Brecher A., Faseyitan O.K., Dell G.S., Mirman D., & Coslett H.B. (2011) Neuroanatomical dissociation for taxonomic and thematic knowledge in the human brain. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108(20), 8520-8524. PMID: 21540329  

  • November 8, 2012
  • 11:58 PM
  • 1,088 views

Seeing Asians speaking English

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

I am very much looking forward to attending the International Conference on Research and Applications of Intercultural Communication in Wuhan next week. By way of preparation, I’ve googled the conference hotel on tripadvisor and was disappointed to discover that the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 8, 2012
  • 12:34 PM
  • 866 views

Arguments against a “prometheus” scenario

by Hannah Little in A Replicated Typo 2.0

The Biological Origin of Linguistic Diversity: From some of the minds that brought you  Chater et al. (2009) comes a new and exciting paper in PlosONE. Chater et al. (2009) used a computational model to show that biological adaptations for language are impossible because language changes too rapidly through cultural evolution for natural selection to [...]... Read more »

Baronchelli A, Chater N, Pastor-Satorras R, & Christiansen MH. (2012) The biological origin of linguistic diversity. PloS one, 7(10). PMID: 23118922  

  • October 31, 2012
  • 07:54 AM
  • 1,770 views

Taking the “icon” out of Emoticon

by Hannah Little in A Replicated Typo 2.0

For some years now Simon Garrod and Nicolas Fay, among others, have been looking at the emergence of symbolic graphical symbols out of iconic ones using communication experiments which simulate repeated use of a symbol. Garrod et al. (2007) use a ‘pictionary’ style paradigm where participants are to graphically depict one of 16 concepts without using [...]... Read more »

  • October 29, 2012
  • 11:28 PM
  • 1,651 views

Embodied cognition: Theoretical claims and theoretical predictions

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

I'm at the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Aphasia (50th Anniversary!) in San Francisco. I like the Academy meeting because it is smaller than the other meetings that I attend and it brings together an interesting interdisciplinary group of people that are very passionate about the neural basis of language and acquired language disorders. One of the big topics of discussion on the first day of the meeting was embodied cognition, particularly its claim that semantic knowledge is grounded in........ Read more »

  • October 7, 2012
  • 11:21 PM
  • 1,277 views

Bilingualism is good for your mental health

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

October is Mental Health month here in New South Wales. The campaign runs under the slogan “Celebrate, connect, grow” and includes some fantastic tips how to look after your mental health. The key point is to build strong relationships and … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 3, 2012
  • 06:49 PM
  • 1,086 views

Niche as a determinant of word fate in online groups (featuring @hanachronism and @richlitt)

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

Last year Altmann, Pierrehumbert & Motter (henceforth, APM) released a great paper in PLoS One: Niche as a determinant of word fate in online groups. Having referenced the paper extensively in my non-bloggy academic world, I thought it was about time I mentioned it on a Replicated Typo. Below is the abstract: Patterns of word [...]... Read more »

Altmann EG, Pierrehumbert JB, & Motter AE. (2011) Niche as a determinant of word fate in online groups. PloS one, 6(5). PMID: 21589910  

  • October 3, 2012
  • 03:00 PM
  • 1,172 views

Niche as a determinant of word fate in online groups (featuring @hanachronism and @richlitt)

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

Last year Altmann, Pierrehumbert & Motter (henceforth, APM) released a great paper in PLoS One: Niche as a determinant of word fate in online groups. Having referenced the paper extensively in my non-bloggy academic world, I thought it was about time I mentioned it on a Replicated Typo.... Read more »

Altmann EG, Pierrehumbert JB, & Motter AE. (2011) Niche as a determinant of word fate in online groups. PloS one, 6(5). PMID: 21589910  

  • September 24, 2012
  • 07:44 PM
  • 1,031 views

Language test masquerading as literacy and numeracy test

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Last week, the results of the 2012 National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) were published. As has been the case since NAPLAN was first introduced in Australia in 2008, the Northern Territory (NT) has, once again, underperformed dramatically. … Continue reading →... Read more »

Gillian Wigglesworth, Jane Simpson, & Deborah Loakes. (2011) NAPLAN LANGUAGE ASSESSMENTS FOR INDIGENOUS CHILDREN IN REMOTE COMMUNITIES: ISSUES AND PROBLEMS. Australian Review of Applied Linguistics, 34(3), 320-343. info:/

  • August 26, 2012
  • 08:53 PM
  • 1,149 views

Illegitimate English

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

The other day I watched a show about global textile production. How fair is fashion? by British educational media producer Pumpkin TV is an excellent resource explaining the circuits of cheap clothing for consumers in the global North, huge profits … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 20, 2012
  • 04:15 AM
  • 1,273 views

Postnatal depression and language proficiency

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Last week I was interviewed for a publication intended to showcase the achievements of women in research. When the interviewer, Meryl Hancock, asked me about the biggest challenge I had faced in my career, I answered “motherhood’ without any hesitation. … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 14, 2012
  • 08:27 PM
  • 1,043 views

Rising multicultural middle class

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

In response to my blog post about the disparity between educational qualifications and employment outcomes faced by select country of origin groups in Australia, Val Colic-Peisker reminded me that there is also a more optimistic way of looking at the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 10, 2012
  • 02:58 PM
  • 2,161 views

Treating participants (or items) as random vs. fixed effects

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

Connoisseurs of multilevel regression will already be familiar with this issue, but it is the single most common topic for questions I receive about growth curve analysis (GCA), so it seems worth discussing. The core of the issue is that in our paper about using GCA for eye tracking data (Mirman, Dixon, & Magnuson, 2008) we treated participants as fixed effects. In contrast, multilevel regression in general, and specifically the approach described by Dale Barr (2008), which is nearly identic........ Read more »

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