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  • April 4, 2013
  • 06:00 PM
  • 931 views

What’s so funny? More laughter in academic talk

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

Is it possible to fully experience humor when using a foreign language? This varies from person to person (you probably know someone with no sense of humor in any language), and maybe also from culture to culture. There’s a lot of culture-specific humor, so that even native speakers of the same language from different cultural [...]... Read more »

  • April 4, 2013
  • 03:25 AM
  • 1,144 views

Multilingual provision is cheaper than English-Only

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

The business and self-help section of my local Kinokuniya bookstore is currently featuring shelves and shelves of Marketplace 3.0: Rewriting the rules of borderless business by Hiroshi Mikitani, the founder and CEO of e-commerce giant Rakuten. I’m not a fan … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • March 26, 2013
  • 11:44 PM
  • 1,037 views

Language and the stratification of restaurant labour

by Calvin Ho in The Plaid Bag Connection

Originally posted at Language on the Move. Different languages for different jobs in this Los Angeles restaurant Are there language requirements for working in restaurants in Los Angeles? These two employment signs that I saw in the window of a sushi restaurant near UCLA suggests that you need English to wait tables and Spanish to [...]... Read more »

Waldinger, Roger. (1998) The Language of Work in an Immigrant Metropolis. Journal des anthropologues. info:/

  • March 25, 2013
  • 03:36 AM
  • 866 views

Fluent chunks: an intro to Linear Unit Grammar

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

The question of how to evaluate English proficiency in lingua franca settings such as English-medium university programs has interested me for a while. One of the criticisms heard against ELF research is that it promotes an “anything goes” attitude toward English. But clearly anything does not go – at least not in high-stakes, professional contexts [...]... Read more »

Mauranen, A. (2012) Linear Unit Grammar. The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics. DOI: 10.1002/9781405198431.wbeal0707  

Sinclair, J. McH., & Mauranen, A. (2006) Linear Unit Grammar:. Integrating speech and writing. DOI: ISBN 978 90 272 2299 2  

  • March 25, 2013
  • 01:23 AM
  • 1,261 views

Language and the stratification of restaurant labour

by Calvin N. Ho in Language on the Move

Are there language requirements for working in restaurants in Los Angeles? These two employment signs that I saw in the window of a sushi restaurant near UCLA suggests that you need English to wait tables and Spanish to work in … Continue reading →... Read more »

Waldinger, Roger. (1998) The Language of Work in an Immigrant Metropolis. Journal des anthropologues. info:/

  • March 19, 2013
  • 06:32 PM
  • 607 views

Let’s draw some wood cells: control acts & accessible lectures in ELF

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

When I introduced the PhD research of the newly-minted Dr. Jaana Suviniitty, I concluded with her main finding – when lectures in English as a lingua franca (ELF) were rated by students as “accessible” or “challenging”, the major difference between the lectures was the presence of interactional features. The accessible lectures which students found more [...]... Read more »

Suviniitty, Jaana. (2012) Lectures in English as a Lingua Franca: Interactional Features. Doctoral dissertation, University of Helsinki. info:/

  • March 19, 2013
  • 12:08 AM
  • 1,412 views

Exclusion on campus

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

A persistent theme in research with international students in Australia is the tension between dreams of inclusion pre-departure and the experience of exclusion once in the country. In Kimie Takahashi’s ethnography with international students from Japan, for instance, participants often … Continue reading →... Read more »

Tara J Yosso; William A Smith; Miguel Ceja; Daniel G Solórzano. (2009) Critical Race Theory, Racial Microaggressions, and Campus Racial Climate for Latina/o Undergraduates . Harvard Educational Review, 79(4). info:/

  • March 13, 2013
  • 03:40 AM
  • 1,714 views

Brain Lateralization - Logical Left vs Creative Right

by Vivek Misra in Uberbrain Research Frontier

Broad generalizations are often made in popular psychology about one side or the other having characteristic labels, such as "logical" for the left side or "creative" for the right. These labels need to be treated carefully; although a lateral dominance is measurable, both hemispheres contribute to both kinds of processes.In psychology and neurobiology, the theory is based on what is known as the lateralization of brain function. So does one side of the brain really control specific functions? A........ Read more »

George MS, Parekh PI, Rosinsky N, Ketter TA, Kimbrell TA, Heilman KM, Herscovitch P, & Post RM. (1996) Understanding emotional prosody activates right hemisphere regions. Archives of neurology, 53(7), 665-70. PMID: 8929174  

Dehaene, S., Piazza, M., Pinel, P., & Cohen, L. (2003) THREE PARIETAL CIRCUITS FOR NUMBER PROCESSING. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 20(3-6), 487-506. DOI: 10.1080/02643290244000239  

  • March 8, 2013
  • 05:24 PM
  • 724 views

Good ELF in English-medium instruction

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

Note: this is the first in a series of posts reviewing the doctoral dissertation of Jaana Suviniitty, Lectures in English as a Lingua Franca: Interactional Features. The early posts of this blog have been dealing with the internationalisation of higher education in Finland, especially with current events in Aalto University. But Aalto’s Business School isn’t [...]... Read more »

Suviniitty, Jaana. (2012) Lectures in English as a Lingua Franca: Interactional Features. Doctoral dissertation, University of Helsinki. info:/

  • March 8, 2013
  • 05:10 AM
  • 1,081 views

Migrant women’s empowerment in the city

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It is international women’s day today and the world’s women are on the move like never before: according to figures from the International Institute for Migration, women constitute 49% of the world’s 214 million transnational migrants. It is often assumed … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • March 4, 2013
  • 10:13 PM
  • 963 views

How Many English Tweets are Actually Possible?

by Jon Wilkins in Lost in Transcription

So, recently (last week, maybe?), Randall Munroe, of xkcd fame, posted an answer to the question "How many unique English tweets are possible?" as part of his excellent "What If" series. He starts off by noting that there are 27 letters (including spaces), and a tweet length of 140 characters. This gives you 27140 -- or about 10200 -- possible strings.

Of course, most of these are not sensible English statements, and he goes on to estimate how many of these there are. This analysis is base........ Read more »

C. E. Shannon. (1951) Prediction and Entropy of Written English. Bell System Technical Journal, 50-64. info:/

  • March 4, 2013
  • 01:26 AM
  • 1,436 views

Is speaking English a civic duty?

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

In today’s immigration countries, adherents of the “one nation, one language” idea face a unique ideological problem: to claim that the national language is a sign of national loyalty and incorporation into the nation while, simultaneously, disavowing any association between … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 28, 2013
  • 06:18 AM
  • 628 views

Blogging about blogging about blogging

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

One of the base assumptions of ELF (English as Lingua Franca) research is that the English spoken between non-native speakers should be studied and understood in its own right. Lately, interest has also grown in written ELF, when English is the lingua franca of written interaction. To complement the spoken academic ELF in the ELFA [...]... Read more »

  • February 25, 2013
  • 04:00 PM
  • 1,768 views

Whorfian economics reconsidered: Why future tense?

by Sean Roberts in A Replicated Typo 2.0

Keith Chen has found a link between people's economic decisions and whether their language has a future tense. But are there other linguistic variables that are even better at predicting economic decisions?... Read more »

Sean Roberts, & James Winters. (2012) Social Structure and Language Structure: the New Nomothetic Approach. Psycology of Language Learning, 16(2), 89-112. info:/10.2478/v10057-012-0008-6

  • February 23, 2013
  • 05:44 PM
  • 729 views

Getting serious about laughter in academic talk

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

Academic discourse is serious business. Lectures are delivered, conference presentations are discussed, great thoughts hang in the air like disembodied spirits. It's not the kind of environment you'd expect to find a lot of laughter and joking. And yet, we academics can't seem to stop laughing.... Read more »

Lee, David. (2006) Humor in spoken academic discourse. NUCB journal of language culture and communication, 8(1), 49-68. info:/

  • February 18, 2013
  • 04:11 PM
  • 1,278 views

Grassroots multilingualism

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

What does an urban middle-class male university graduate from Conakry, the capital of Guinea, have in common with a peasant woman with little education from a village in Sichuan? Well, both are caught up in the processes of globalization and … Continue reading →... Read more »

Han, Huamei. (2013) Individual Grassroots Multilingualism in Africa Town in Guangzhou: The Role of States in Globalization. International Multilingual Research Journal, 83-97. info:/

  • February 15, 2013
  • 05:18 AM
  • 646 views

7-months old bilingual infants use prosody to learn the basics of grammar in different languages

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Researchers have found that bilingual infants have unique ability to differentiate and learn the grammar of the native languages depending on the “prosodic cues”.

This research has been published online in the journal Nature Communications.

Prosody refers to the regularity of spoken language, with stress and tone, or the study of these patterns i.e. rhythm of speech.

It is a matter of great interest that how the children learn the grammar of the native language through speec........ Read more »

  • February 13, 2013
  • 10:42 PM
  • 1,024 views

To English with Love

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It’s Valentine’s Day today. Valentine’s Day is a truly global event inextricably linking the emotional life of individuals with the capitalist world order. Young women around the world dream of romantic love and many men do their best to meet … Continue reading →... Read more »

Takahashi, Kimie. (2013) Language learning, gender and desire: Japanese women on the move. Multilingual Matters. info:/

  • January 31, 2013
  • 04:37 PM
  • 1,290 views

Is English improving lives in a remote Indonesian village?

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

In a recent post, I reviewed language policy research that shows how compulsory English in China has given rise to new inequities and is far from being a means to fair development. In that context, compulsory English language learning is … Continue reading →... Read more »

Pasassung, Nikolaus. (2003) Teaching English in an "Acquisition-Poor Environment": An Ethnographic Example of a Remote Indonesian EFL Classroom. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, University of Sydney. info:/

  • January 17, 2013
  • 06:31 PM
  • 1,063 views

A golden age of multiculturalism

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Last week I had the privilege of attending, virtually, a seminar devoted to “Mobilities, Language Practices and Identities” organized by the CIEN Group at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. The seminar brought together a small number of international scholars working … Continue reading →... Read more »

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