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  • November 10, 2013
  • 06:26 PM
  • 1,308 views

Bilingualism delays onset of dementia

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It is by now widely known that bilingualism delays the onset of dementia. What is less widely known is the fact that this knowledge is almost exclusively derived from Canadian research conducted by Ellen Bialystok and her team (e.g., Bialystock … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 5, 2013
  • 07:00 AM
  • 1,471 views

13 Ancient Villages Discovered in Wyoming Mountains May Redraw Map of Tribal Migrations

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

High in the alpine forests of Wyoming, archaeologists have discovered more than a dozen villages dating back over 2,000 years, a find that could alter our understanding of the scope of human habitation in the ancient West, as well as the histories and migrations of the people who lived there.... Read more »

  • October 29, 2013
  • 07:55 PM
  • 1,693 views

Saussure, the procrastinator

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Procrastination is a fact of academic life, particularly during the PhD period, as every academic supervisor knows. However, judging from ever-increasing institutional efforts to control procrastination or from the many self-help guides intended to cure procrastination, it would seem that … Continue reading →... Read more »

Paola Villani. (1990) Documenti saussuriani conservati a Lipsia e a Berlino. Cahiers Ferdinand de Saussure, 3-33. info:/

  • October 27, 2013
  • 06:53 PM
  • 741 views

Who’s in charge of English? Uses and descriptions of ELF

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

One of the recent topics here has been language regulation – what are the norms of English when it’s used as a lingua franca (ELF), when most of the parties in interaction aren’t native speakers of English? The only way to find out is to investigate the practices of ELF users in naturally occurring interaction, […]... Read more »

Hynninen, Niina. (2013) Language Regulation in English as a Lingua Franca: Exploring language-regulatory practices in academic spoken discourse. Doctoral dissertation, University of Helsinki. info:other/http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-952-10-8639-7

  • October 22, 2013
  • 07:27 PM
  • 1,042 views

Disenchanted in Bangkok

by Kimie Takahashi 高橋君江 in Language on the Move

“When Thai people ask me where I’m from, I tell them, “Oh I’m from the Philippines or Singapore. Then, I don’t get that look!” A young woman from Myanmar recently told me her experience of living in Bangkok as an … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 21, 2013
  • 06:39 PM
  • 1,449 views

The mind is not a (digital) computer

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

The "mind as computer" has been a dominant and powerful metaphor in cognitive science at least since the middle of the 20th century. Throughout this time, many of us have chafed against this metaphor because it has a tendency to be taken too literally. Framing mental and neural processes in terms of computation or information processing can be extremely useful, but this approach can turn into the extremely misleading notion that our minds work kind of like our desktop or laptop computers. There ........ Read more »

McClelland JL, Mirman D, & Holt LL. (2006) Are there interactive processes in speech perception?. Trends in cognitive sciences, 10(8), 363-369. PMID: 16843037  

  • October 18, 2013
  • 12:56 AM
  • 1,070 views

English and development aid work

by Kerry Taylor-Leech in Language on the Move

  A response to Alexandra Grey, “We do aid, not English” In my experience English is often promoted by aid organisations as part of a package and served up with very little consultation of recipients and not much concern for … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 16, 2013
  • 10:15 PM
  • 1,085 views

“We do aid, not English!”

by Alexandra Grey in Language on the Move

Over a few years of involvement in the aid sector in Asia, I became aware that aid workers turn their noses up at ‘English work’. Managers for my Australian government volunteering program encouraged us not to be sucked in to … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • September 30, 2013
  • 05:17 AM
  • 702 views

On the entangled banks of representations (pt.1)

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

Lately, I took time out to read through a few papers I’d put on the backburner until after my first year review was completed. Now that’s out of the way, I found myself looking through Berwick et al.‘s review on Evolution, brain, and the nature of language. Much of it is written in strongly worded language and read more...... Read more »

Wilson AD, & Golonka S. (2013) Embodied Cognition is Not What you Think it is. Frontiers in psychology, 58. PMID: 23408669  

  • September 29, 2013
  • 10:19 AM
  • 765 views

WrELFA corpus progress report: 500k words

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

There’s growing interest in English as a lingua franca (ELF) research on description of written ELF. Up to now, ELF data has almost exclusively been drawn from spoken interaction, which is where a lingua franca gets used in the first place. But the use of English as a second/foreign language extends into the written mode […]... Read more »

  • September 5, 2013
  • 12:03 AM
  • 957 views

Music on the Move

by Mahesh Radhakrishnan in Language on the Move

An important element of language relates to its aesthetic use, in other words, how we make our lives beautiful and present ourselves to the world beautifully through language. Anthropologists and linguists have been interested in this dimension throughout the 20th … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 31, 2013
  • 05:50 PM
  • 939 views

In search of wild diversity: a closer look at 3rd-person zero marking in ELF

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

One of my most-read posts has been on the frequencies of 3rd-person singular present verb forms (he says, she says) in English spoken as a lingua franca (ELF). When looking at English used primarily between non-native speakers of English, is there a greater likelihood of finding the unmarked “zero” form of 3rd-person singular present – […]... Read more »

Cogo, A., & Dewey, M. (2006) Efficiency in ELF Communication: From Pragmatic Motives to Lexico-grammatical Innovation. Nordic Journal of English Studies, 5(2), 59-93. info:other/

  • August 29, 2013
  • 10:10 PM
  • 1,219 views

Beyond the mother tongue

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

This book review was originally published in Language in Society 42 (4), 463-466. [Copyright: Cambridge University Press; Language in Society] Access pdf version of this review here. Yasemin Yildiz , Beyond the mother tongue: The postmonolingual condition. New York: Fordham University Press, 2012. … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 27, 2013
  • 05:41 AM
  • 971 views

Language Learning Begins in the Womb

by Josephine Lethbridge in United Academics

New research from the University of Helsinki suggests that humans begin to distinguish between sounds before they are even born. Eino Partanen and colleagues explored how prenatal experiences influence learning. “We wanted to find out what kind of material foetuses can learn in the womb, what kind of neural representations they form,” he said.... Read more »

Eino Partanen et al. (2013) Learning-induced neural plasticity of speech processing before birth. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1302159110  

  • August 18, 2013
  • 08:32 PM
  • 821 views

“I am going to looks like stupid”: language commentary & correction in spoken ELF

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

When I introduced the PhD thesis of ELFA project member Niina Hynninen (read the intro here), I outlined some considerations for studying language regulation when English is spoken as a lingua franca (ELF). The norms of acceptable English in ELF settings are not self-evident – certainly the norms of “correctness” in relation to native-speaker standards […]... Read more »

Hynninen, Niina. (2013) Language Regulation in English as a Lingua Franca: Exploring language-regulatory practices in academic spoken discourse. Doctoral dissertation, University of Helsinki. info:other/

  • August 15, 2013
  • 04:29 AM
  • 1,296 views

Uncovering spurious correlations between language and culture

by Sean Roberts in The Adventures of Auck

There's a recent trend for studies that show correlations between linguistic features and cultural features, such as future tense and economic decisions. However, the problems are poorly understood. And dinosaurs.... Read more »

Sean Roberts, & James Winters. (2013) Linguistic Diversity and Traffic Accidents: Lessons from Statistical Studies of Cultural Traits . PLOS ONE, 8(8). info:/doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0070902

  • August 15, 2013
  • 04:16 AM
  • 966 views

Uncovering spurious correlations between language and culture

by Sean Roberts in A Replicated Typo 2.0

James and I have a new paper out in PLOS ONE where we demonstrate a whole host of unexpected correlations between cultural features. These include acacia trees and linguistic tone, morphology and siestas, and traffic accidents and linguistic diversity. We hope it will be a touchstone for discussing the problems with analysing cross-cultural statistics, and read more...... Read more »

Sean Roberts, & James Winters. (2013) Linguistic Diversity and Traffic Accidents: Lessons from Statistical Studies of Cultural Traits . PLOS ONE, 8(8). info:/doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0070902

  • July 27, 2013
  • 04:18 PM
  • 879 views

Laughter in academic talk: Brits, Yanks & ELF compared

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

When I was earlier blogging on the frequencies of laughter in academic ELF (English as a lingua franca), I came across an article by Prof. Hilary Nesi, a compiler of the BASE corpus – the Corpus of British Academic Spoken English. She provides a qualitative analysis of the types and functions of laughter episodes in […]... Read more »

Lee, David. (2006) Humor in academic spoken discourse. NUCB Journal of Language, Culture and Communication, 8(1), 49-68. info:other/

Nesi, Hilary. (2012) Laughter in university lectures. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 11(2), 79-89. DOI: 10.1016/j.jeap.2011.12.003  

  • July 26, 2013
  • 10:19 AM
  • 734 views

Study Links Social Status to How We Comprehend Meaning

by Alexia Attwood in United Academics

A speaker’s social status can affect how we interpret their words, a study has found.

The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, involved researchers showing the study’s 18 German participants videotapes of a powerful politician (the German Federal Minister of Finance at the time of the experiment), and an unknown person, making both true and false statements.

Examples of true statements shown to the German participants included “Michael Jackson is a pop singer”,........ Read more »

  • July 22, 2013
  • 05:21 AM
  • 815 views

Book Review: Language and Sexism

by Farid Pazhoohi in Epistemophil

“Another book written by a woman!” What does this sentence convey to you? What is the first thought that flashes into your mind? My intention is to present a brilliant book written by an expert in her field. Did you have the same feeling or did you get the opposite impression? If you found some […]... Read more »

Pazhoohi, Farid. (2013) Book Review: Language and Sexism. Journal of Language and Social Psychology. DOI: 10.1177/0261927X13481344  

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