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  • April 3, 2012
  • 01:16 AM
  • 1,573 views

Next Generation Artificial Intelligence

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

As computer scientists this year celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of the mathematical genius Alan Turing, who set out the basis for digital computing in the 1930s to anticipate the electronic age, they still quest after a machine as adaptable and intelligent as the human brain. Now, computer scientist Hava Siegelmann of the [...]... Read more »

  • April 1, 2012
  • 04:30 AM
  • 1,333 views

Did language emerge from the neural systems supporting aimed throwing?

by Andrew Wilson in Notes from Two Scientific Psychologists

Aimed throwing is surprisingly uncommon in the animal kingdom. Humans do it par excellence, and otherwise it only shows up occasionally, even in our closest relatives. Chimpanzees will throw things (often faeces) but unlike humans don't throw things when hunting or trying to get food; when non-human animals throw things, it's usually part of a social encounter.Throwing is a fascinating task for many reasons; I hope to blog some about the perception-action aspects of this task in the future as I ........ Read more »

  • March 26, 2012
  • 08:03 AM
  • 1,702 views

English belongs to everyone?

by Christof Demont-Heinrich in Language on the Move

The claim that “English belongs to everyone who uses it” has continued to gain more and more cultural cache, at least in global (English) academic circles. On the surface, the claim that “English belongs to everyone who uses it” makes … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • March 23, 2012
  • 05:56 AM
  • 1,914 views

The Bizarreness Effect and Spotting E.T.

by Jason Carr in Wired Cosmos

Recently I’ve been researching historical accounts of UFO sightings/alien abductions (this topic never ceases to fascinate me) and exploring possible scientific explanations for their occurrences when I stumbled across a theory known as the bizarreness effect. I thought I would share a little of what I’ve learned of this theory and would love to hear [...]... Read more »

  • March 14, 2012
  • 10:30 PM
  • 2,291 views

Sonification: Listen To The Sun / Listen To CERN's LHC

by DJ Busby in Astronasty

Solar storm data has recently been translated through a process called sonification into audio. CERN uses this technology too. Here are videos and explanations for both.... Read more »

Alberto de Campo, Natascha Hormann, Harald Markum, Willibald Plessas, & Bianka Sengi. (2005) Sonification of lattice data: The spectrum of the Dirac operator across the deconfinement transition. Proceedings of Science. info:other/PoS: LAT2005-152

Katharina Vogt, Robert H¨oldrich, David Pirr`o, Martin Rumori, Stefan Rossegger, Werner Riegler, & Matevˇz Tadel. (2010) A SONIC TIME PROJECTION CHAMBER. SONIFIED PARTICLE DETECTION AT CERN. International Conference on Auditory Display. info:other/ISBN: 0-9670904-3-1

  • March 13, 2012
  • 10:08 AM
  • 1,012 views

The Importance of Friendship

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

Within our education system most of the focus on social environments is geared toward highly salient issues with legal implications — things like bullying and violence. What often gets overlooked is a much less serious but much more common situation — the shy kid with no friends who spends all day unhappy and uninterested. As [...]... Read more »

Walton, G., Cohen, G., Cwir, D., & Spencer, S. (2012) Mere belonging: The power of social connections. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102(3), 513-532. DOI: 10.1037/a0025731  

  • March 7, 2012
  • 05:17 AM
  • 1,447 views

Strange academic women

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

We are marking International Women’s Day here on Language-on-the-Move with a portrait of Cezaria Baudouin de Courtenay Ehrenkreutz Jędrzejewiczowa, the first female Chair Professor of Anthropology at Warsaw University and, possibly, anywhere else in the world. Like many successful women … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 27, 2012
  • 01:19 AM
  • 1,342 views

The sociolinguistics of nail care

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Have you recently had a manicure or a pedicure? I haven’t. In fact, I’ve never been to a nail salon in my life. Until about a decade ago that would not have been unusual among my friends and acquaintances. Today, … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 20, 2012
  • 02:11 AM
  • 1,418 views

Bilingualism: Bane or Boon?

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Hungarians in Romania Up until a few decades ago, the academic consensus – along with public opinion – was that bilingualism is detrimental to the individual and society. Nowadays, that has all changed and the new consensus is that bilingualism … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 14, 2012
  • 06:23 PM
  • 1,431 views

Language shift and phone sex

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Ever since I left my native village in the Bavarian Forest more than 25 years ago, I have been returning for regular, even if infrequent, visits. Over the years, there have been many changes and two of them have been … Continue reading →... Read more »

Lucht, F., Frey, B., & Salmons, J. (2011) A Tale of Three Cities: Urban-Rural Asymmetries in Language Shift?. Journal of Germanic Linguistics, 23(04), 347-374. DOI: 10.1017/S1470542711000195  

  • February 8, 2012
  • 10:11 AM
  • 1,803 views

Small Primate Communicates in High-Pitched Sounds Inaudible to Humans

by United Academics in United Academics

US researchers have discovered that Philippine Tarsier can “talk” within the pure ultrasound domain, this is, above human hearing capacity.... Read more »

Ramsier, M., Cunningham, A., Moritz, G., Finneran, J., Williams, C., Ong, P., Gursky-Doyen, S., & Dominy, N. (2012) Primate communication in the pure ultrasound. Biology Letters. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2011.1149  

  • January 27, 2012
  • 03:57 PM
  • 1,414 views

When Psychologists Take Things Too Literally

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish




Thankfully, in brainstorming meetings where I'm asked to "think outside the box," no one has ever put me in an actual box. That's not true of the undergrads who volunteered for a recent psychology study.

Angela Leung, a researcher in Singapore, and her colleagues in the United States were studying a phenomenon called "embodied cognition." The idea is that a brain can't help being influenced by the body it's stuck inside. Feelings can run backward: We might be smiling because we're happy, or ........ Read more »

Angela Leung, Suntae Kim, Evan Polman, See Lay, Link Qiu, Jack Goncalo, & Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks. (2012) Embodied Metaphors and Creative "Acts". Psychological Science. info:/

  • January 26, 2012
  • 11:44 AM
  • 2,475 views

Writing Tip: Better “You” Than “I”

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations


You are a sick man…you are a spiteful man.

That’s not the first line of Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s Notes from the Underground; Dostoyevsky used the first person: “I am a ... Read more »

  • January 25, 2012
  • 10:24 PM
  • 1,366 views

The Great Mystery of Vanishing Phonemes

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

It’s been well over a year since I first wrote about the relationship between phoneme inventory size and demography (see here and here). Since then, I have completed a thesis examining this relationship further, especially in the context of the relative roles of demography and tradeoffs between other linguistic subsystems (namely, a language’s lexicon and [...]... Read more »

  • January 20, 2012
  • 07:40 PM
  • 1,648 views

The Adventures of DataThief

by Jon Brock in Cracking the Enigma

Having spent much of the past week struggling to make sense of my data, it’s good to come home, pour a glass of wine, put on some Sharon Jones, and, er… play with somebody else’s data!Recently, I’ve discovered DataThief - an application that allows you to scan in a graph from a paper and extract the data points. Sometimes, this provides insights that really aren’t obvious from the original paper.The other week, for example, I came across an intriguing neuroimaging study reported on the........ Read more »

  • January 13, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,017 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The “extremist effect”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Most of us are familiar with the strategy of destroying a reputation with a barrage of nastiness. We all bemoan the ‘negative campaigning’ that is ramping up in this election year. But the problem is–it works. That is, “if you throw enough mud against the wall, something sticks”. And as it turns out, it doesn’t [...]
Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: The innuendo effect
Simple Jury Persuasion: The ‘attitude alignment’ effect & persuasion
Simple Jury Persuasion: The ‘w........ Read more »

Nelson, T., Gwiasda, G., & Lyons, J. (2011) Vilification and Values. Political Psychology, 32(5), 813-835. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9221.2011.00844.x  

  • January 8, 2012
  • 01:59 AM
  • 1,498 views

Why You Should Be Friends With Bilingual People

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

Bilingual education education is starting to pick up steam in the U.S, and why not — two languages are better one. But there is another aspect of speaking two languages that’s overlooked, and it’s something much more important than being able to impress girls in your salsa dancing class with your command of the imperfect [...]... Read more »

Rubio-Fernández, P., & Glucksberg, S. (2012) Reasoning about other people's beliefs: Bilinguals have an advantage. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 38(1), 211-217. DOI: 10.1037/a0025162  

  • December 31, 2011
  • 04:43 PM
  • 1,480 views

Study: True Memories Can Form As Early as 2 Years Old

by David Berreby in Mind Matters


Ah, New Year's Eve: It feels so important to find something significant, meaningful, memorable to do. And then two weeks later you can't recall what it was, because it was so much like all the others.  If this year brought something really unique and striking (a sky-parade of 12 dancing pink ...Read More
... Read more »

  • December 21, 2011
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,227 views

Which reads faster, Chinese or English?

by Tim De Chant in Per Square Mile

If there’s one thing that can dazzle my Western eyes, it’s the main drag of any Taiwanese town. On my recent trip to Taiwan, I saw billboards and signs for local shops that dripped from buildings with so many hues Benjamin Moore would blush. Once my mind had adjusted to the mishmash of colors, I [...]... Read more »

Sun, F, & Feng, D. (2010) Eye movements in reading Chinese and English text. Reading Chinese Script: A cognitive analysis, Eds. Jian Wang, Albrecht W. Inhoff, Hsuan-Chih Chen., 189-205. info:other/9780805824780

  • December 21, 2011
  • 09:00 AM
  • 592 views

℗ Which reads faster, Chinese or English?

by Tim De Chant in Per Square Mile

If there’s one thing that can dazzle my Western eyes, it’s the main drag of any Taiwanese town. On my recent trip to Taiwan, I saw billboards and signs for local shops that dripped from buildings with so many hues Benjamin Moore would blush. Once my mind had adjusted to the mishmash of colors, I [...]... Read more »

Sun, F, & Feng, D. (2010) Eye movements in reading Chinese and English text. Reading Chinese Script: A cognitive analysis, Eds. Jian Wang, Albrecht W. Inhoff, Hsuan-Chih Chen., 189-205. info:other/9780805824780

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