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  • September 29, 2016
  • 02:21 AM
  • 799 views

Urban sociolinguistics in Dubai

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

A couple of years ago, I mused here on Language on the Move what linguistic theory would look like if...... Read more »

Piller, I. (2016) Dubai: Language in the ethnocratic, corporate and mobile city. Smakman, D. and P. Heinrich. Eds. Metrolinguistics: Urban Language Ecologies around the World. info:/

  • September 21, 2016
  • 01:46 AM
  • 815 views

Can ESL teachers play a role in helping maintain the home language?

by Agnes Bodis in Language on the Move








ESL teachers play an important role in home language maintenance (Image Credit: Macquarie University)
Learning the host country’s language is important for migrants but we should not forget that maintaining the home language is just as essential for the next generation’s success in life. Unfortunately, in Australia there are no policies in place that support the home language maintenance of languages other than English. In the absence of top-down approaches, changing........ Read more »

  • September 15, 2016
  • 12:24 AM
  • 867 views

Language and migration

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Humans are a migratory species. Although in modern society the dominant imagery we have created about ourselves is that it...... Read more »

Piller, I. (2016) Language and migration. Language and migration, 1-20. info:/

  • September 13, 2016
  • 08:02 AM
  • 683 views

Impaneling a jury? Remember this (and that) during voir dire! 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s a round-up of articles that could be “all about voir dire” or simply interesting things to ponder as you go about your daily tasks. You may not think of Lemony Snicket as an expert on voir dire but he may have a point with the quote illustrating this post when it comes to voir […]

Related posts:
Should political orientation matter in voir dire?
Voir Dire Fundamentals: Look for trouble, not for friends
Voir Dire Strategy: Who’s the authoritarian?


... Read more »

  • September 6, 2016
  • 01:34 AM
  • 845 views

Why a multilingual social imagination matters

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Last week I was fortunate to be able to attend the 2016 annual conference of the British Association of Applied...... Read more »

  • July 17, 2016
  • 05:57 AM
  • 948 views

Would you mind if your child wanted to become an interpreter?

by Jinhyun Cho in Language on the Move

I recently volunteered to give a presentation on the profession of translation and interpreting as a parent helper for a...... Read more »

  • July 15, 2016
  • 06:56 AM
  • 820 views

How to test for music skills

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

In a new article I evaluate a recently developed test for music listening skills. To my great surprise the test behaves very well. This could open the path to better understand the psychology underlying music listening. Why am I surprised? I got my first taste of how difficult it is to replicate published scientific results […]... Read more »

Singleton, C., Horne, J., & Simmons, F. (2009) Computerised screening for dyslexia in adults. Journal of Research in Reading, 32(1), 137-152. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9817.2008.01386.x  

  • June 20, 2016
  • 11:44 AM
  • 1,023 views

The Mesh of Civilizations in Cyberspace

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

A team of researchers from Stanford University, Cornell University and Yahoo recently decided to evaluate the "connectedness" of the hypothesized Huntington civilizations in cyberspace and published their results in the article "The Mesh of Civilizations in the Global Network of Digital Communication".

The researchers examined Twitter users and the exchange of emails between Yahoo-Mail users in 90 countries with a minimum population of five million. In total, they analyzed........ Read more »

  • June 5, 2016
  • 02:05 AM
  • 1,019 views

Why does English spread in global academia?

by Jinhyun Cho in Language on the Move

The Linguistic Ethnography Forum’s e-seminar devoted to Ingrid Piller’s recent book Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice: An Introduction to Applied...... Read more »

Piller, I., & Cho, J. (2013) Neoliberalism as language policy. Language in Society, 42(01), 23-44. DOI: 10.1017/S0047404512000887  

  • May 11, 2016
  • 02:10 AM
  • 1,056 views

Do monolingual teachers produce a Golem effect in multilingual students?

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Teacher expectations produce self-fulfilling prophecies in student performance: high teacher expectations result in students’ higher academic performance and low teacher...... Read more »

  • April 28, 2016
  • 07:19 AM
  • 1,117 views

Portrait of a linguistic shirker

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move








I recently pointed out that the widespread belief that migrants refuse to learn the language of their new country does not stack up against the realities of adult language learning. I summarized the research that shows that adult language learning is complex and difficult and rarely an all-out success; to blame migrants for their failure to learn a new language (well) is adding insult to injury.
The German-language club (“Stammtisch”) in New York founded by G........ Read more »

  • April 12, 2016
  • 07:11 PM
  • 1,134 views

Cleaning work: a stepping-stone or a dead-end job for migrants?

by Maiju Strommer in Language on the Move

Let me at once introduce you to the main character of this blog post: Kifibin. He is a Ugandan man...... Read more »

  • April 6, 2016
  • 07:23 AM
  • 1,198 views

The language that cannot speak its name

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Our understanding of the role of language in social life suffers from a particularly intractable problem: the terms we use...... Read more »

  • April 3, 2016
  • 04:25 PM
  • 974 views

Debunking the Myth of the Sole Genious

by Paco Jariego in Mind the Post

Innovations don’t require heroic geniuses any more than your thoughts hinge on a particular neuron.... Read more »

Muthukrishna, M., & Henrich, J. (2016) Innovation in the collective brain. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 371(1690), 20150192. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2015.0192  

  • March 30, 2016
  • 04:19 AM
  • 1,018 views

The real problem with linguistic shirkers

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Germany has discovered a new social type that is causing grieve in modern diverse societies: the “Integrationsverweigerer;” literally someone who...... Read more »

  • March 14, 2016
  • 07:10 PM
  • 1,109 views

Crucial communication: language management in Australian asylum interviews

by Laura Smith-Khan in Language on the Move

Asylum seekers in Australia face a few very public hurdles. Successive governments have used increasingly restrictive refugee policies to gain...... Read more »

  • March 8, 2016
  • 10:22 PM
  • 1,096 views

Temples helping heritage language maintenance in Australia

by Niru Perera in Language on the Move

Do you know which non-Christian religion has grown the fastest in Australia since the new millennium? You might be surprised...... Read more »

Perera, N. (2016) Tamil in the temples – Language and religious maintenance beyond the first generation. Multilingua. info:/10.1515/multi-2015-0059

  • March 3, 2016
  • 10:01 PM
  • 1,308 views

Herder: an explainer for linguists

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Some contemporary sociolinguists love to hate an 18th century educator, philosopher, theologian, translator and general polymath by the name of...... Read more »

  • February 27, 2016
  • 01:00 AM
  • 1,108 views

Sticks and stones (3): How names hurt

by Michael Ramscar in The Importance of Being Wrong

The shock of the old

Most people in Iceland don’t have family names. Instead, Icelanders’ last names are made from their father or mother’s first name, to which males add the suffix -son (son) and females -dóttir (daughter). This practice can seem strange to outsiders, but it was common throughout Scandinavia until surprisingly recently: laws compelling citizens to adopt heritable family names were only enacted in 1828 in Denmark, 1901 in Sweden, and 1922 in Norway......... Read more »

Baek SK, Kiet HA, & Kim BJ. (2007) Family name distributions: master equation approach. Physical review. E, Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics, 76(4 Pt 2), 46113. PMID: 17995066  

Chang, J., Donnelly, P., Wiuf, C., Hein, J., Slatkin, M., Ewens, W., & Kingman, J. (1999) Recent common ancestors of all present-day individuals. Advances in Applied Probability, 31(4), 1002-1026. DOI: 10.1239/aap/1029955256  

Colman, A., Sluckin, W., & Hargreaves, D. (1981) The effect of familiarity on preferences for surnames. British Journal of Psychology, 72(3), 363-369. DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-8295.1981.tb02195.x  

A. Crook. (2012) Personal Names in 18th-Century Scotland: a case study of the parish of Beith (North Ayrshire). Journal of Scottish Name Studies, 1-10. info:/

Guo, J., Chen, Q., & Wang, Y. (2011) Statistical distribution of Chinese names. Chinese Physics B, 20(11), 118901. DOI: 10.1088/1674-1056/20/11/118901  

Shannon, C. (1948) A Mathematical Theory of Communication. Bell System Technical Journal, 27(3), 379-423. DOI: 10.1002/j.1538-7305.1948.tb01338.x  

Shannon, C. (1951) Prediction and Entropy of Printed English. Bell System Technical Journal, 30(1), 50-64. DOI: 10.1002/j.1538-7305.1951.tb01366.x  

  • February 9, 2016
  • 06:40 PM
  • 1,066 views

Alles in Ordnung? Reflections on German order

by Rahel Cramer in Language on the Move

Everyone who has learned a second language will have noticed that certain words and expressions cannot be translated easily from...... Read more »

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