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  • March 20, 2017
  • 11:25 AM
  • 306 views

Opioids, Benzos and Risk for Overdose

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

The evolving epidemic of opioid overdose and overdose deaths is receiving increased public and research attention.Opioids overdoses and overdose deaths are often unintentional or accidental. It has been known that concurrent use of opioids with alcohol or benzodiazepines (i.e. Valium or Xanax) increases risk for overdose toxicity.A recent study published in the British Medical Journal confirmed the association of concurrent benzodiazepine prescription with opioid overdose.This research team exam........ Read more »

  • March 1, 2017
  • 09:27 AM
  • 279 views

Politics Trump Healthcare Information: News Coverage of the Affordable Care Act

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Gollust and colleagues found that 55% of the news stories either focused on the politics of the ACA such as political disagreements over its implementation (26.5%) or combined information regarding its politics with information on how it would affect healthcare insurance options (28.6%). Only 45% of the news stories focused exclusively on the healthcare insurance options provided by the law. The politics-focused news stories were also more likely to refer to the law as “Obamacare” wh........ Read more »

  • December 16, 2016
  • 05:25 AM
  • 456 views

Patient participation in clinical trials

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Clinical trials are crucial to help doctors and scientists understand how to safely treat a particular condition, to evaluate new treatments and to test drug safety and efficacy. They have an important role in every step of managing a condition with different clinical trials helping with prevention, diagnosis, treatments and follow-up support.... Read more »

  • September 8, 2016
  • 09:16 AM
  • 686 views

CRISPR on my plate, and some GMO’s on the side

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

A CRISPR recipe Less than a month ago, the world’s first official CRISPR/Cas9 meal was served. CRISPR/Cas9 is a fairly new technology to edit genomes, and cut and paste genes at will. Well, it’s not exactly that new. It’s actually been around for a long time. CRISPR, or *humhum* Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats […]... Read more »

Snell C, Bernheim A, Bergé JB, Kuntz M, Pascal G, Paris A, & Ricroch AE. (2012) Assessment of the health impact of GM plant diets in long-term and multigenerational animal feeding trials: a literature review. Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 50(3-4), 1134-48. PMID: 22155268  

  • August 25, 2016
  • 09:40 AM
  • 734 views

How to rebuild a brain

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

After the stroke The human brain is complicated. Very complicated. And like any piece of complex machinery that relies on the smooth functioning of many components, it’s not immune to malfunction. When a part of the brain doesn’t get proper nutrition through a nice and smooth blood flow, things go awry and a stroke occurs. […]... Read more »

  • August 3, 2016
  • 09:13 AM
  • 786 views

Do we need a doping Olympics? The ethics of doping in sports

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

There is only her and the track. The people standing on her left and right do not matter now. She has only one adversary: time. In her head she plays how the future might…will unfold. Forty seven strides. That’s all she needs. All things on the periphery disappear. Her world, her universe becomes a single […]... Read more »

  • May 16, 2016
  • 03:34 PM
  • 865 views

Novel Borrelia Species Causes Lyme Disease with High Spirochetemia

by Pranab Chatterjee in Zoonoticus

In a recent paper in the Lancet Infectious Diseases, Pritt et al  have identified a new genospecies of Borrelia which is attributed to have caused several cases of Lyme disease, marked by a high degree of spirochetemia. In their research article abstract, they state: Methods At the Mayo clinic, from 2003 to 2014, we tested […]... Read more »

  • April 23, 2016
  • 12:41 PM
  • 581 views

Does E. ewingii Cause More Cases of Ehrlichiosis Than Previously Thought?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Zoonoticus

This figure shows the incidence of ehrlichicosis cases by state in 2010 per million persons. Ehrlichiosis was not notifiable in Alaska, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota or Montana. The incidence rate was zero for Arizona, Connecticut, Indiana, Massachusetts, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and Wyoming. Incidence […]... Read more »

Harris, R., Couturier, B., Sample, S., Coulter, K., Casey, K., & Schlaberg, R. (2016) Expanded Geographic Distribution and Clinical Characteristics of Infections, United States . Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 862-865. DOI: 10.3201/eid2205.152009  

  • April 6, 2016
  • 12:02 PM
  • 664 views

World Serology Bank: Key to a Better Understanding of Infectious Disease Dynamics?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Zoonoticus

An article published in The Lancet today has highlighted the possibility of establishing a World Serology Bank to better understand the dynamics of infectious disease dynamics, especially in an era where vaccinations against infectious diseases is becoming more and more prevalent. With rapid advance in diagnostic technologies, there has been impressive progress in what used […]... Read more »

  • February 28, 2016
  • 08:35 AM
  • 1,149 views

Week 8 In Review: Open-Access Science | 22 to 28 Feb

by TakFurTheKaffe in Tak Fur The Kaffe

Sea level rose faster in the 20th century than in any other century of the last 3,000 years, new methods for estimating future sea level rise and heat waves, consumers to blame for their carbon footprint, and new virtual forests predict future impacts of climate change. Here are five of the latest scientific studies published open-access this week.... Read more »

Kopp, R., Kemp, A., Bittermann, K., Horton, B., Donnelly, J., Gehrels, W., Hay, C., Mitrovica, J., Morrow, E., & Rahmstorf, S. (2016) Temperature-driven global sea-level variability in the Common Era. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201517056. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1517056113  

Mengel, M., Levermann, A., Frieler, K., Robinson, A., Marzeion, B., & Winkelmann, R. (2016) Future sea level rise constrained by observations and long-term commitment. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201500515. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1500515113  

Ivanova, D., Stadler, K., Steen-Olsen, K., Wood, R., Vita, G., Tukker, A., & Hertwich, E. (2015) Environmental Impact Assessment of Household Consumption. Journal of Industrial Ecology. DOI: 10.1111/jiec.12371  

  • February 9, 2016
  • 08:28 AM
  • 631 views

Bring Me Sunshine...

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

The latest Public Health statement is about the dangers of suntanning. But what IS a suntan? And how could it lead to cancer...?... Read more »

NICE. (2016) Sunlight exposure: risks and benefits. National Institute for Health . info:/

Newton-Bishop, J., Chang, Y., Elliott, F., Chan, M., Leake, S., Karpavicius, B., Haynes, S., Fitzgibbon, E., Kukalizch, K., Randerson-Moor, J.... (2011) Relationship between sun exposure and melanoma risk for tumours in different body sites in a large case-control study in a temperate climate. European Journal of Cancer, 47(5), 732-741. DOI: 10.1016/j.ejca.2010.10.008  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 03:36 PM
  • 864 views

Turning to the “Infected Jelly” to Treat Ebola

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The NEJM has come out with a very interesting paper: Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The explosive outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in West Africa last year had hijacked the headlines and media space in a big way. Multiple solutions were touted, including the vaccine trial STRIVE. Few articles, however, looked…... Read more »

van Griensven J, Edwards T, de Lamballerie X, Semple MG, Gallian P, Baize S, Horby PW, Raoul H, Magassouba N, Antierens A.... (2016) Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The New England journal of medicine, 374(1), 33-42. PMID: 26735992  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 01:28 PM
  • 1,213 views

If Colistin Goes, Can Carbapenems be Far Behind?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

I wrote about the disaster-in-the-making discovery of transmissible resistance to colistin, a last resort antibiotic, when the Lancet Infectious Diseases published a paper based on data coming out from surveillance in China. At that point of time, the isolation of the transmissible gene providing resistance (mcr1 gene) gained a lot of attention. Maryn McKenna’s blog post went…... Read more »

  • January 8, 2016
  • 11:01 AM
  • 811 views

Devil in a bottle?

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

The media are on the warpath again! This time, it's alcohol. But is this new?... Read more »

Department of Health. (2016) Alcohol Guidelines Review – Report from the Guidelines development group to the UK Chief Medical Officers. www.gov.uk. info:/

Bagnardi, V., Rota, M., Botteri, E., Tramacere, I., Islami, F., Fedirko, V., Scotti, L., Jenab, M., Turati, F., Pasquali, E.... (2012) Light alcohol drinking and cancer: a meta-analysis. Annals of Oncology, 24(2), 301-308. DOI: 10.1093/annonc/mds337  

  • October 7, 2015
  • 11:30 PM
  • 889 views

Social Class Differences in Mental Health: Do Parenting Style and Friendship Play a Role?

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

It is now well-established that social class is positively related to mental health. However, researchers remain unclear about the specific processes that underlie the relation between social class and depression. In some recent research, we investigated the potential roles of parenting style and friendship in explaining the relationship between social class and mental health.... Read more »

  • August 23, 2015
  • 08:00 PM
  • 678 views

Courting Disaster

by Angela Reisetter in Steeped in Science

A response to the measles death in the U.S. in July 2015, in defense of vaccination.... Read more »

  • July 29, 2015
  • 02:09 PM
  • 1,447 views

The “Invisible Web” Undermines Health Information Privacy

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

What do the third parties do with your data? We do not really know because the laws and regulations are rather fuzzy here. We do know that Google, Facebook and Twitter primarily make money by advertising so they could potentially use your info and customize the ads you see. Just because you visited a page on breast cancer does not mean that the "Invisible Web" knows your name and address but they do know that you have some interest in breast cancer. It would make financial sense to sen........ Read more »

  • June 19, 2015
  • 12:23 PM
  • 635 views

6 Realities of Genomic Research

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

The rise of next-generation sequencing has worked wonders for the field of genetics and genomics. It’s also generated a considerable amount of hype about the power of genome sequencing, particularly the possibility of individualized medicine based on genetic information. The rapid advances in technology — most recently, the Illumina X Ten system — have made […]... Read more »

Rehm HL, Berg JS, Brooks LD, Bustamante CD, Evans JP, Landrum MJ, Ledbetter DH, Maglott DR, Martin CL, Nussbaum RL.... (2015) ClinGen--the Clinical Genome Resource. The New England journal of medicine, 372(23), 2235-42. PMID: 26014595  

  • March 31, 2015
  • 05:45 AM
  • 1,534 views

African-Americans Receive Heart Transplants at Hospitals With Poor Performance Track Records

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

About five million people in the US suffer from heart failure, and approximately half of them die within five years of being diagnosed. Only about 2,500 hundred people a year receive a heart transplant – the treatment of last resort. A new heart can be life-saving, but it is also life-changing. Even under the best conditions, the surgery is complex, and recovery carries a heavy physical and emotional burden.
... Read more »

  • March 30, 2015
  • 11:25 AM
  • 843 views

One Parent,Two Parents and Child Well-Being

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

The structure of the family in the United States and other countries is changing. This change has occurred over a relatively brief period of time. Data noted in the study I am reviewing today shows that between 1970 and 2013 in the U.S.:Percentage of children living with two parents dropped 24%Percentage of children living with a single mother increased to 23.7%Percentage of children living with a single father quadrupled to 4.1%Percentage of children living with a grandparent doubled to 6......... Read more »

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