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  • July 28, 2016
  • 09:34 AM
  • 790 views

Game of Farmers: Agriculture is coming

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

Gron gazed across the plain from inside a tuft of long grass. There. Just in front of the far hillock. Gazelles. Meals on legs. He vaguely remembered mother carrying him through cooler forests when he was not yet old enough to walk. He had never understood why they had left. But he had learned, had […]... Read more »

Zeder MA. (2008) Domestication and early agriculture in the Mediterranean Basin: Origins, diffusion, and impact. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105(33), 11597-604. PMID: 18697943  

Lazaridis, I., Nadel, D., Rollefson, G., Merrett, D., Rohland, N., Mallick, S., Fernandes, D., Novak, M., Gamarra, B., Sirak, K.... (2016) Genomic insights into the origin of farming in the ancient Near East. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature19310  

  • June 20, 2016
  • 11:44 AM
  • 885 views

The Mesh of Civilizations in Cyberspace

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

A team of researchers from Stanford University, Cornell University and Yahoo recently decided to evaluate the "connectedness" of the hypothesized Huntington civilizations in cyberspace and published their results in the article "The Mesh of Civilizations in the Global Network of Digital Communication".

The researchers examined Twitter users and the exchange of emails between Yahoo-Mail users in 90 countries with a minimum population of five million. In total, they analyzed........ Read more »

  • December 8, 2015
  • 01:46 PM
  • 1,446 views

The Dire State of Science in the Muslim World

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Universities and the scientific infrastructures in Muslim-majority countries need to undergo radical reforms if they want to avoid falling by the wayside in a world characterized by major scientific and technological innovations. This is the conclusion reached by Nidhal Guessoum and Athar Osama in their recent commentary "Institutions: Revive universities of the Muslim world", published in the scientific journal Nature. The physics and astronomy professor Guessoum (American University ........ Read more »

  • October 26, 2015
  • 02:25 AM
  • 1,263 views

A week in review: Top open-access science stories

by Cath Jex in Tak Fur The Kaffe

There's simply not enough time in the week to write about everything that I'd like! So here are 6 extra short summaries of scientific studies published during the past week, available free via open-access journals for anyone and everyone to read and enjoy!... Read more »

Luo J, Ault JS, Shay LK, Hoolihan JP, Prince ED, Brown CA, & Rooker JR. (2015) Ocean Heat Content Reveals Secrets of Fish Migrations. PloS one, 10(10). PMID: 26484541  

  • June 25, 2015
  • 01:43 PM
  • 1,833 views

The Long Shadow of Nazi Indoctrination: Persistence of Anti-Semitism in Germany

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Voigtländer and Voth examined the results of the large General Social Survey for Germany (ALLBUS) in which several thousand Germans were asked about their values and beliefs. The survey took place in 1996 and 2006, and the researchers combined the results of both surveys with a total of 5,300 participants from 264 German towns and cities. The researchers were specifically interested in anti-Semitic attitudes and focused on three survey questions specifically related to anti-Semitism. Survey........ Read more »

Voigtländer N, & Voth HJ. (2015) Nazi indoctrination and anti-Semitic beliefs in Germany. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 26080394  

  • January 5, 2015
  • 04:02 PM
  • 1,853 views

Typical Dreams: A Comparison of Dreams Across Cultures

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Have you ever wondered how the content of your dreams differs from that of your friends? How about the dreams of people raised in different countries and cultures? It is not always easy to compare dreams of distinct individuals because the content of dreams depends on our personal experiences. This is why dream researchers have developed standardized dream questionnaires in which common thematic elements are grouped together. These questionnaires can be translated into various languages and used........ Read more »

Nielsen, T., Zadra, A., Simard, V., Saucier, S., Stenstrom, P., Smith, C., & Kuiken, D. (2003) The Typical Dreams of Canadian University Students. Dreaming, 13(4), 211-235. DOI: 10.1023/B:DREM.0000003144.40929.0b  

Schredl M, Ciric P, Götz S, & Wittmann L. (2004) Typical dreams: stability and gender differences. The Journal of psychology, 138(6), 485-94. PMID: 15612605  

  • December 8, 2014
  • 09:02 AM
  • 1,976 views

Climate Change: Heatwaves and Poverty in Pakistan

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

In the summer of 2010, over 20 million people were affected by the summer floods in Pakistan. Millions lost access to shelter and clean water, and became dependent on aid in the form of food, drinking water, tents, clothes and medical supplies in order to survive this humanitarian disaster. It is estimated that at least $1.5 billion to $2 billion were provided as aid by governments, NGOs, charity organizations and private individuals from all around the world, and helped contain the devastating ........ Read more »

  • November 13, 2014
  • 06:28 PM
  • 995 views

Hard times, tough gods

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

Almost all cultures have some kind of supernatural beliefs. But it may surprise you to know that belief in moralising supernatural beings, who care about whether mortals do good or bad, are far from universal. That’s fascinating, and it begs the question: “why?”. Why do some cultures bother to believe spirits who watch over us [Read More...]

... Read more »

Botero CA, Gardner B, Kirby KR, Bulbulia J, Gavin MC, & Gray RD. (2014) The ecology of religious beliefs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25385605  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 10:12 AM
  • 1,031 views

Night-Time Lights Intensity Indicates Regional Favoritism

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at Monash University and the University of St Gallen have used satellite data on night-time light intensity and information about the birthplaces of political leaders in 126 countries to pinpoint regional favoritism.... Read more »

Hodler, R., & Raschky, P. (2014) Regional Favoritism. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 129(2), 995-1033. DOI: 10.1093/qje/qju004  

  • June 29, 2014
  • 12:19 AM
  • 1,271 views

Predicting the Flu

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Using search engines to predict the future of infectious diseases: computer science meets epidemiology. [Infographic]... Read more »

  • May 2, 2014
  • 07:12 AM
  • 1,472 views

Journal Club: Hummingbirds: still evolving endless forms most wonderful

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: A new study finds that the rising Andes are tied to the rapid speciation of hummingbirds. This study also predicts that hummingbirds will evolve twice as many species as what we see today. ... Read more »

McGuire Jimmy A. , Witt Christopher C. , Remsen, Jr. J.V. , Corl Ammon , Rabosky Daniel L. , Altshuler Douglas L. , & Dudley Robert . (2014) Molecular Phylogenetics and the Diversification of Hummingbirds. Current Biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.016  

Hoorn C., Wesselingh F. P., ter Steege H., Bermudez M. A., Mora A., Sevink J., Sanmartin I., Sanchez-Meseguer A., Anderson C. L., & Figueiredo J. P. (2010) Amazonia Through Time: Andean Uplift, Climate Change, Landscape Evolution, and Biodiversity. Science, 330(6006), 927-931. DOI: 10.1126/science.1194585  

Doorn G. S. v., Noest A. J., & Hogeweg P. (1998) Sympatric speciation and extinction driven by environment dependent sexual selection. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 265(1408), 1915-1919. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.1998.0520  

  • March 7, 2014
  • 11:38 AM
  • 1,427 views

In Diversifying Neighborhoods, How Do Attitudes Shift?

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Almost half a century after the Fair Housing Act was passed in 1968, many American cities – including New York; Washington, DC; Chicago; and Houston – are still vastly segregated […]... Read more »

  • February 7, 2014
  • 09:22 AM
  • 1,570 views

A Parched Future: Global Land and Water Grabbing

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Land grabbing refers to the large-scale acquisition of comparatively inexpensive agricultural land in foreign countries by foreign governments or corporations. In most cases, the acquired land is located in under-developed countries in Africa, Asia or South America, while the grabbers are investment funds based in Europe, North America and the Middle East. The acquisition can take the form of an outright purchase or a long-term-lease, ranging from 25 to 99 years, that gives the grabbing entity e........ Read more »

Rulli MC, Saviori A, & D'Odorico P. (2013) Global land and water grabbing. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(3), 892-7. PMID: 23284174  

  • February 7, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,029 views

The Olympic Effect: Will Sochi Really Benefit?

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

Major sports events seem to be one of the best city marketing strategies. The connotation of heroic achievements, camaraderie and excitement is the ultimate promotion for any city in the world.Several studies have examined the influence on a city of hosting a mega-event. First, a research from 2011 published in The Economic Journal shows that after the event, trade is over 20% higher for host countries.... Read more »

  • February 1, 2014
  • 07:25 AM
  • 1,695 views

Heat drives Pakistani migration

by Andy Extance in Simple Climate

As floods don’t impact farming income like high temperatures does, according to Valerie Mueller from the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington DC and her colleagues, perhaps some aid money should go to developing more heat-resistant crops to prepare for further climate change. ... Read more »

Clark L. Gray and Valerie Mueller. (2012) Natural disasters and population mobility in Bangladesh. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1115944109  

  • October 17, 2013
  • 11:28 AM
  • 861 views

Number of New Energy Patents Increased Dramatically

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A recent study by MIT and Santa Fe Institute (SFI) researchers found a “dramatic growth in innovation” in renewable energy technologies.... Read more »

Luis M. A. Bettencourt, Jessika E. Trancik, & Jasleen Kaur. (2013) Determinants of the Pace of Global Innovation in Energy Technologies. PLoS ONE, 8(10). arXiv: 1211.5167v1

  • October 8, 2013
  • 12:10 PM
  • 1,701 views

Ecological Underpinnings of Wealth

by Guest Contributor in PLOS Biologue

 
By Jon Chase
Question: What’s the best way to improve the economy of a developing country?
Answer: Provide better healthcare to its citizens and conserve its biodiversity
Better healthcare?!? If you’ve been listening to the conversations from the left…... Read more »

  • May 6, 2013
  • 02:04 PM
  • 1,167 views

The Aspens that were left behind

by Jes in Biogeography Bits

When climates change, species move. It’s a fact of life on Earth and probably has been for the past 542 million years, even when species don’t have legs or wings or fins to get them from place to place.

Quaking aspen is one example of a seemingly stationary species that has managed in just the past 20,000 years to expand into the largest range of any native North American tree.... Read more »

  • May 1, 2013
  • 09:57 PM
  • 1,324 views

Sing a song of Sphagnum

by Jes in Biogeography Bits

For a plant, there is one good thing about being small; it’s a lot easier to get everywhere- for your seeds, that is. Nowhere is this more evident than where all plants are really small- the Arctic tundra.... Read more »

  • March 18, 2013
  • 06:39 PM
  • 978 views

Biological Beta Testing: Altitudinal Edition

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

Spatial patterns in biodiversity have always been a popular topic in ecology, and understanding these patterns helps us to address the looming threats to biodiversity.Did you notice how I made the word ‘patterns’ plural? There isn’t a whole separate field of biogeography for nothin’. Biological diversity is difficult (some say impossible) to measure using a single metric. How do you count things? Simply by the number of species? How about rare versus common species? What about species t........ Read more »

Mori, A., Shiono, T., Koide, D., Kitagawa, R., Ota, A., & Mizumachi, E. (2013) Community assembly processes shape an altitudinal gradient of forest biodiversity. Global Ecology and Biogeography. DOI: 10.1111/geb.12058  

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