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  • May 11, 2015
  • 03:23 PM
  • 965 views

Peer review: The pleasure of publishing – originally published in the journal eLife in January/2015

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

When assessing manuscripts eLife editors look for a combination of rigour and insight, along with results and ideas that make other researchers think differently about their subject. … Read More →... Read more »

  • May 6, 2015
  • 04:59 PM
  • 920 views

eLife: an example of improved peer review

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The online open access peer reviewed journal eLife publishes articles in biomedicine and life sciences. The nonprofit publication emerged from the ideas of its founders to create a publication model that met the needs of the academic community regarding editorial policy. The journal relies on a staff of Senior Editors made of renowned, experienced researchers, which are active in their fields. Its peer review process is innovative and aims to ensure clear assessment goals as well as constructive........ Read more »

  • April 30, 2015
  • 06:22 PM
  • 763 views

The use of research metrics is diversified in the Leiden Manifesto

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Research evaluation in recent decades has been increasingly conducted through metrics and indicators, which are gradually replacing the assessment by peers. Researchers gathered at the 19th International Conference on Science and Technology Indicators (STI 2014) held in September 2014 in Leiden, Netherlands, in order to advise on the use of metrics in research assessment drafted a set of rules - the Leiden Manifesto. Know its guidelines. … Read More →... Read more »

Hicks Diana, Ludo Waltman, Sarah de Rijcke, & Ismael Rafols. (2015) Bibliometrics: The Leiden Manifesto for research metrics. Nature, 520(7548), 429-431. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/520429a  

  • April 24, 2015
  • 05:41 PM
  • 1,327 views

Peer-review as a research topic in its own right

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Over the last decade, the topic of scholarly communication has attracted the interest of researchers in all fields of knowledge. One of the most studied topics is the assessment of peer review, including its qualitative and quantitative aspects, its ability to detect and curb unethical practices, the appreciation of its methods of assessment and how technology can facilitate and improve the process, while meeting the challenges brought about by the age of digital publishing. … Read More &#........ Read more »

Nicholas David, Hamid R. Jamali, Eti Herman, Carol Tenopir, Rachel Volentine, Suzie Allard, & Kenneth Levine. (2015) Peer review: still king in the digital age. Learned Publishing, 28(1), 15-21. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1087/20150104  

Onitilo Adedayo A., Sherry A. Salzman-Scott, Rachel V. Stankowski, & Suhail A. R. Doi. (2013) A Core-Item Reviewer Evaluation (CoRE) System for Manuscript Peer Review. Accountability in Research, 21(2), 109-121. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08989621.2014.847664  

  • April 17, 2015
  • 04:09 PM
  • 848 views

Peer review: bad with it, worse without it

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Peer review is seen as one of the pillars - if not the most important - of scientific communication. Despite the difficulties in going through the review process, the authors believe that the process improves the quality of the manuscript, and they want to be published on refereed journals that have a sound evaluation mechanism. Recent cases of attempted manipulation of the peer review process by fake reviews concern the international scientific community, however, it does not undermine its cred........ Read more »

Nicholas David, Hamid R. Jamali, Eti Herman, Carol Tenopir, Rachel Volentine, Suzie Allard, & Kenneth Levine. (2015) Peer review: still king in the digital age. Learned Publishing, 28(1), 15-21. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1087/20150104  

  • April 9, 2015
  • 12:30 PM
  • 837 views

The Elsevier you know is not the only Elsevier

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The current science publisher Elsevier may have the same name as the venerable publishing house that published the work of great scientists in the 16th and 17th century, but there is in fact no historical connection other than the name. … Read More →... Read more »

FREDRIKSSON Einar. (2001) The Dutch Publishing Scene: Elsevier and North-Holland. IOS Press.

FREDRIKSSON, E. H. (2001) The Dutch Publishing Scene: Elsevier and North-Holland. A century of science publishing: a collection of essays. info:/

  • March 27, 2015
  • 04:21 PM
  • 861 views

Peer review modalities, pros and cons

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The double-blind peer review system is chosen by most researchers as an effective and efficient mechanism by eliminating subjective judgment as well as authorship and affiliation biases, allowing to focus on the quality of the manuscript. Nature reports that authors can, from now on, choose this form of review for their manuscripts. Here are discussed the most common forms of peer review, its features, advantages and disadvantages, including those regarding SciELO Brazil journals. … Read M........ Read more »

  • March 20, 2015
  • 10:20 AM
  • 832 views

Could grant proposal reviews be made available openly?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Researchers have been discussing what would be the impact of making the review process of grant proposals more open and transparent, in order to support the preparation of better proposals and acknowledge the work of the reviewers. A recently published paper in Nature examines the impact of two articles on the open availability of the review of research proposals and the possibility of changing the assessment after publication of the results. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 13, 2015
  • 04:00 PM
  • 911 views

Study analyzes the use of social networks in the assessment of scientific impact

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The use of social networks in science communication has been increasing on a large scale, and specific platforms have been created for interaction and information sharing among researchers. A study by researchers at the University of St. Gallen, in Switzerland evaluated whether and how scientific impact can be measured by social media data analysis, and how this approach correlates to traditional metrics. … Read More →... Read more »

HOFFMANN, C.P., LUTZ, C., & MECKEL, M. (2014) Impact Factor 2.0: Applying Social Network Analysis to Scientific Impact Assessment. 47th Hawaii International Conference on System Science, Hilton Waikoloa Village. DOI: 10.1109/HICSS.2014.202  

boyd, D., & Ellison, N. (2007) Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), 210-230. DOI: 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00393.x  

Priem, J. (2013) Scholarship: Beyond the paper. Nature, 495(7442), 437-440. DOI: 10.1038/495437a  

  • March 11, 2015
  • 11:14 AM
  • 1,416 views

Citizen science is making scientists of everyone

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Citizen science is getting a lot of attention these days, which might make you think it is a new social phenomenon. But in fact, nothing is further from the truth.... Read more »

Blackawton P. S., Airzee S. , Allen A., Baker S., Berrow A., Blair C., Churchill M., Coles J., Cumming R. F.-J., & Fraquelli L. (2011) Blackawton bees. Biology Letters, 168-172. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.1056  

Silvertown Jonathan. (2009) A new dawn for citizen science. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 24(9), 467-471. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2009.03.017  

  • December 8, 2014
  • 04:14 AM
  • 901 views

Why evaluating scientists by grant income is stupid

by Dorothy Bishop in bishopblog

Several UK universities explicitly use research funding as a criterion for hiring and firing scientists. I argue this is stupid because it damages (a) staff wellbeing, (b) the institution's reputation and (c) the progress of science. ... Read more »

  • November 2, 2014
  • 07:08 PM
  • 870 views

...How to Fix Science

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

(Part 2/2) However, we can fix science. [Infographic]... Read more »

Alberts, B., Kirschner, M., Tilghman, S., & Varmus, H. (2014) Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(16), 5773-5777. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404402111  

  • November 2, 2014
  • 07:32 AM
  • 962 views

Research is Broken...

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

(Part 1/2) The system of funding research is broken... [Infographic]... Read more »

Alberts, B., Kirschner, M., Tilghman, S., & Varmus, H. (2014) Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(16), 5773-5777. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404402111  

  • June 18, 2014
  • 12:00 PM
  • 963 views

Elsevier et al’s pricing douchebaggery exposed

by Juan Nunez-Iglesias in I Love Symposia!

Ted Bergstrom and a few colleagues have just come out with an epic paper in which they reveal how much for-profit academic publishing companies charge university libraries, numbers that had previously been kept secret. The paper is ostensibly in the field of economics, but it could be more accurately described as “sticking-it-to-the-man-ology”.... Read more »

Bergstrom, T., Courant, P., McAfee, R., & Williams, M. (2014) Evaluating big deal journal bundles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1403006111  

  • February 27, 2014
  • 01:39 AM
  • 1,313 views

Nanotechnology and Smart Materials for “More than Moore” – It’s a Small World After All!

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Ever since Gordon Moore fore told about the future of the integrated circuit (IC) back in 1965 [1], Moore’s law was not only an accurate forecast of the achievements that microelectronics community has made, but also was a yardstick of the appropriate level of the commercial development in microelectronics for the past five decades. Such an amazing pace of the IC technology development was possible essentially because of simple two-dimensional (2D) structure of the metal-oxide-semiconducto........ Read more »

Jeong Bong Lee. (2014) Nanotechnology and Smart Materials for “More than Moore” – It’s a Small World After All!. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-3. info:/1: 102

  • January 14, 2014
  • 11:00 AM
  • 1,278 views

NIH Grant Scores Are Poor Predictors Of Scientific Impact

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

A recent paper published in Circulation Research, a major cardiovascular research journal, challenges the assumption that the scores a grant application receives can reliably predict the future impact of the research.... Read more »

Narasimhan Danthi, Colin O Wu, Peibei Shi, & Michael S Lauer. (2014) Percentile Ranking and Citation Impact of a Large Cohort of NHLBI-Funded Cardiovascular R01 Grants. Circulation Research. info:/

  • October 15, 2013
  • 03:37 AM
  • 1,060 views

The Matthew effect and REF2014

by Dorothy Bishop in bishopblog

UK universities are gearing up for REF2014, a nationwide evaluation of research quality, on the basis of which central funding will be determined. Before the funding formula is specified, we need a discussion about whether we should be focusing mainly on supporting elite institutions, or whether it would be preferable to distribute funds more widely.... Read more »

  • June 28, 2013
  • 12:24 PM
  • 1,345 views

Gamification of in silico open synthetic biology: a game-changer.

by Eugenio Maria Battaglia in Semanto.me

Fancy doing some Synthetic Biology but you don’t have access to a lab or expensive equipments?
Don’t worry.... Read more »

Gerd H. G. Moe-Behrens, Rene Davis, & Karmella A. Haynes. (2013) Preparing synthetic biology for the world. Frontiers in MICROBIOTECHNOLOGY, ECOTOXICOLOGY AND BIOREMEDIATION. DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2013.00005  

  • April 8, 2013
  • 05:08 AM
  • 1,156 views

Publish and Perish: Aspects of Science Fraud

by GDW in The Beast, the Bard and the Bot

If you want to make it in the academic world, you better publish. A lot. Preferably in so-called high-impact journals. Otherwise, no job and no funding (or the other way around). Hence the use of the phrase ‘publish or perish’ to capture the enormous importance of generating sufficient publications in sufficiently respectable journals. And most [...]... Read more »

  • April 6, 2013
  • 04:16 PM
  • 1,254 views

Induced Hibernation in Rat: an interview with Matteo Cerri

by Eugenio Maria Battaglia in Semanto.me

The possibility of inducing a suspended animation state similar to natural torpor would be greatly beneficial in medical science, since it would avoid the adverse consequence of the powerful autonomic activation evoked by external cooling. Previous attempts to systemically inhibit metabolism were successful in mice, but practically ineffective in nonhibernators. Here we show that the selective pharmacological inhibition of key neurons in the central pathways for thermoregulatory cold defense is ........ Read more »

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