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  • April 28, 2015
  • 10:40 AM
  • 1,689 views

Murder Your Darling Hypotheses But Do Not Bury Them

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

There is surprisingly little data on how and when scientists reject hypotheses, but John Fugelsang and Kevin Dunbar at Dartmouth conducted a rather unique study "Theory and data interactions of the scientific mind: Evidence from the molecular and the cognitive laboratory" in 2004 in which they researched researchers. They sat in at scientific laboratory meetings of three renowned molecular biology laboratories at carefully recorded how scientists presented their laboratory data and how........ Read more »

Fugelsang, J., Stein, C., Green, A., & Dunbar, K. (2004) Theory and Data Interactions of the Scientific Mind: Evidence From the Molecular and the Cognitive Laboratory. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology/Revue canadienne de psychologie expérimentale, 58(2), 86-95. DOI: 10.1037/h0085799  

  • April 24, 2015
  • 05:41 PM
  • 1,301 views

Peer-review as a research topic in its own right

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Over the last decade, the topic of scholarly communication has attracted the interest of researchers in all fields of knowledge. One of the most studied topics is the assessment of peer review, including its qualitative and quantitative aspects, its ability to detect and curb unethical practices, the appreciation of its methods of assessment and how technology can facilitate and improve the process, while meeting the challenges brought about by the age of digital publishing. … Read More &#........ Read more »

Nicholas David, Hamid R. Jamali, Eti Herman, Carol Tenopir, Rachel Volentine, Suzie Allard, & Kenneth Levine. (2015) Peer review: still king in the digital age. Learned Publishing, 28(1), 15-21. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1087/20150104  

Onitilo Adedayo A., Sherry A. Salzman-Scott, Rachel V. Stankowski, & Suhail A. R. Doi. (2013) A Core-Item Reviewer Evaluation (CoRE) System for Manuscript Peer Review. Accountability in Research, 21(2), 109-121. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08989621.2014.847664  

  • April 17, 2015
  • 04:09 PM
  • 824 views

Peer review: bad with it, worse without it

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Peer review is seen as one of the pillars - if not the most important - of scientific communication. Despite the difficulties in going through the review process, the authors believe that the process improves the quality of the manuscript, and they want to be published on refereed journals that have a sound evaluation mechanism. Recent cases of attempted manipulation of the peer review process by fake reviews concern the international scientific community, however, it does not undermine its cred........ Read more »

Nicholas David, Hamid R. Jamali, Eti Herman, Carol Tenopir, Rachel Volentine, Suzie Allard, & Kenneth Levine. (2015) Peer review: still king in the digital age. Learned Publishing, 28(1), 15-21. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1087/20150104  

  • April 15, 2015
  • 09:58 AM
  • 1,275 views

Take Charge of Your Learning Strategies

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

Do you feel in charge of your own learning? Do you learn well with good teachers and bad? Or even if there isn’t one at all? With the wealth of information available today, you have more opportunity than ever to know nearly anything that is known. You can go out and learn virtually anything you […]
Check out Take Charge of Your Learning Strategies, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • April 9, 2015
  • 12:30 PM
  • 812 views

The Elsevier you know is not the only Elsevier

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The current science publisher Elsevier may have the same name as the venerable publishing house that published the work of great scientists in the 16th and 17th century, but there is in fact no historical connection other than the name. … Read More →... Read more »

FREDRIKSSON Einar. (2001) The Dutch Publishing Scene: Elsevier and North-Holland. IOS Press.

FREDRIKSSON, E. H. (2001) The Dutch Publishing Scene: Elsevier and North-Holland. A century of science publishing: a collection of essays. info:/

  • March 30, 2015
  • 12:00 PM
  • 959 views

Human Evolution

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Evolution: How we became human. An Infographic by Yisela A. Trentini.... Read more »

W. Howard Levie, & Richard Lentz. (1982) Effects of text illustrations: A review of research. Educational Technology Research , 30(4), 195-232. info:/10.1007/BF02765184

  • March 27, 2015
  • 04:21 PM
  • 835 views

Peer review modalities, pros and cons

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The double-blind peer review system is chosen by most researchers as an effective and efficient mechanism by eliminating subjective judgment as well as authorship and affiliation biases, allowing to focus on the quality of the manuscript. Nature reports that authors can, from now on, choose this form of review for their manuscripts. Here are discussed the most common forms of peer review, its features, advantages and disadvantages, including those regarding SciELO Brazil journals. … Read M........ Read more »

  • March 23, 2015
  • 08:05 AM
  • 1,030 views

Pictures, Not Paragraphs

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Old and new literature confirm the common idea that visual communication and learning is far more effective and appealing than just text.... Read more »

W. Howard Levie, & Richard Lentz. (1982) Effects of text illustrations: A review of research. Educational Technology Research , 30(4), 195-232. info:/10.1007/BF02765184

  • March 20, 2015
  • 10:20 AM
  • 809 views

Could grant proposal reviews be made available openly?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Researchers have been discussing what would be the impact of making the review process of grant proposals more open and transparent, in order to support the preparation of better proposals and acknowledge the work of the reviewers. A recently published paper in Nature examines the impact of two articles on the open availability of the review of research proposals and the possibility of changing the assessment after publication of the results. … Read More →... Read more »

  • March 17, 2015
  • 09:31 AM
  • 1,459 views

Gender equality in science: it takes a village

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Late last year, a metastudy was published showing that, since 2000, things are improving for women working in most STEM-based fields, although there are some notable exceptions... Read more »

  • March 14, 2015
  • 09:18 AM
  • 477 views

Hispanic and Uninsured Adults May Experience Barriers To Blood Pressure Control

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Stella Yi, Ph.D., MPH, Assistant Professor Department of Population Health New York University School of Medicine MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Yi: Self-blood pressure monitoring has been shown … Continue reading →
The post Hispanic and Uninsured Adults May Experience Barriers To Blood Pressure Control appeared first on MedicalResearch........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Stella Yi, Ph.D., MPH. (2015) Hispanic and Uninsured Adults May Experience Barriers To Blood Pressure Control. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 13, 2015
  • 04:00 PM
  • 886 views

Study analyzes the use of social networks in the assessment of scientific impact

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The use of social networks in science communication has been increasing on a large scale, and specific platforms have been created for interaction and information sharing among researchers. A study by researchers at the University of St. Gallen, in Switzerland evaluated whether and how scientific impact can be measured by social media data analysis, and how this approach correlates to traditional metrics. … Read More →... Read more »

HOFFMANN, C.P., LUTZ, C., & MECKEL, M. (2014) Impact Factor 2.0: Applying Social Network Analysis to Scientific Impact Assessment. 47th Hawaii International Conference on System Science, Hilton Waikoloa Village. DOI: 10.1109/HICSS.2014.202  

boyd, D., & Ellison, N. (2007) Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), 210-230. DOI: 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00393.x  

Priem, J. (2013) Scholarship: Beyond the paper. Nature, 495(7442), 437-440. DOI: 10.1038/495437a  

  • March 11, 2015
  • 11:14 AM
  • 1,391 views

Citizen science is making scientists of everyone

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Citizen science is getting a lot of attention these days, which might make you think it is a new social phenomenon. But in fact, nothing is further from the truth.... Read more »

Blackawton P. S., Airzee S. , Allen A., Baker S., Berrow A., Blair C., Churchill M., Coles J., Cumming R. F.-J., & Fraquelli L. (2011) Blackawton bees. Biology Letters, 168-172. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.1056  

Silvertown Jonathan. (2009) A new dawn for citizen science. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 24(9), 467-471. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2009.03.017  

  • March 9, 2015
  • 09:58 AM
  • 2,623 views

“She’s strong for a girl”: The Negative Impact of Stereotypes About Women

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

We have all heard the stereotypes: women can’t drive, they don’t understand computers, and how many blondes does it take to screw in a light bulb? But those are all in good fun, right? But what if gender stereotypes actually bring about the observed differences between men and women that supposedly underline these stereotypes? A recent study by the psychologist Marina Pavlova at the University of Tübingen tested this idea.... Read more »

Pavlova, M., Weber, S., Simoes, E., & Sokolov, A. (2014) Gender Stereotype Susceptibility. PLoS ONE, 9(12). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0114802  

  • March 8, 2015
  • 03:33 PM
  • 950 views

A Study Strategy for all Occasions: Test your Memory

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

You have a test coming up. You need to know the material. First, you need to know how to study for it. One way to study is to read back over your notes, textbook, and any other material. Is that really how to study? An alternative approach would be to test your memory. That could […]
Check out A Study Strategy for all Occasions: Test your Memory, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

Carpenter, S. (2012) Testing Enhances the Transfer of Learning. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 21(5), 279-283. DOI: 10.1177/0963721412452728  

  • March 8, 2015
  • 10:00 AM
  • 1,134 views

Gender inequality in science varies among disciplines

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Certain disciplines have a lower percentage of women than others. A study published in Science puts forward the hypothesis that there are proportionately fewer women in fields where it is believed that brilliance and innate talent are required rather than hard work and dedication. The study, which looked at 1,820 researchers in institutions of higher education in the United States, showed an inverse relationship between the fields that value innate talent and the number of women represented in t........ Read more »

  • March 5, 2015
  • 04:11 PM
  • 830 views

350 years of scientific publication: from the “Journal des Sçavans” and Philosophical Transactions to SciELO

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Is has been 350 years since the first numbers of the first journals of scientific nature were published - Journal des Sçavans and Philosophical Transactions. With the support of the new printing technology handwritten letters used in the communication between researchers and scholars have been replaced. There is much to celebrate in these 350 years in which scientific journals contributed to the record and memory of the advancement of science. Online Web publishing is the most important t........ Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 10:30 AM
  • 1,008 views

Examining Evidence for Leaderboards and Learning

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

As I described in my last post, gamification is often misused and abused, applied in ways and in situations where it is unlikely to do much good. When we deploy new learning technologies, the ultimate goal of that change should always be clear, first and foremost. So how do you actually go about setting that sort of […]The post Examining Evidence for Leaderboards and Learning appeared first on NeoAcademic.Related articles from NeoAcademic:Psychological Theory and Gamification of Learning........ Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 08:34 AM
  • 365 views

New and Experienced Surgeons Have Similar Patient Mortality Rates

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Samuel D. Pimentel Doctoral student Statistics Department Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania   MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Surgical training has undergone major changes in recent … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Samuel D. Pimentel. (2015) New and Experienced Surgeons Have Similar Patient Mortality Rates. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 04:11 AM
  • 1,021 views

Shelf Life: the Olinguito’s Skull

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Instead of travelling to remote locations in faraway countries, scientists sometimes discover a new species by looking a little more closely at an old specimen in a museum drawer.... Read more »

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