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  • December 14, 2015
  • 04:49 PM
  • 1,032 views

Self-Explanation: A Good Reading Strategy for Bad Texts (& Good)

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

One of the important study skills we need in our increasingly technology driven world is the ability to learn from hard-to-understand text. Maybe you’re trying to grasp a biology textbook chapter on sexual reproduction. Or perhaps you’re reading articles on the web to figure out how to extend your home network by repurposing an old…
Check out Self-Explanation: A Good Reading Strategy for Bad Texts (& Good), an original post on Thinker Academy.
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  • December 9, 2015
  • 09:58 AM
  • 607 views

Depression A Common and Growing Problem Among Medical Residents

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Douglas A. Mata, M.D., M.P.H. Anatomic and Clinical Pathology Resident Physician, Brigham & Women’s Hospital Clinical Fellow, Harvard Medical School Boston, MA 02115 Marco A. Ramos, M.Phil., M.S.Ed. History of Science and Medicine M.D./Ph.D. Candidate, Yale School … Continue reading →
The post Depression A Common and Growing Problem Among Medical Residents appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Douglas A. Mata, M.D., M.P.H., & Marco A. Ramos, M.Phil., M.S.Ed. (2015) Depression A Common and Growing Problem Among Medical Residents. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • December 9, 2015
  • 09:49 AM
  • 575 views

Most Medical School Graduates Get The Resident Education Required For Licensure

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Henry Sondheimer, MD Senior director of student affairs American Association of Medical Colleges Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Sondheimer: The background for this study in JAMA’s Med … Continue reading →
The post Most Medical School Graduates Get The Resident Education Required For Licensure appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Henry Sondheimer, MD. (2015) Most Medical School Graduates Get The Graduate Education Required For Licensure. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • December 8, 2015
  • 04:48 PM
  • 621 views

Medical Residents Work Almost 70 hours per week, 1/3 on Electronic Records

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: David Ouyang MD Department of Internal Medicine Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, California Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Ouyang: In American teaching hospitals, trainee resident physicians … Continue reading →
The post Medical Residents Work Almost 70 hours per week, 1/3 on Electronic Records appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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David Ouyang MD. (2015) Medical Residents Work Almost 70 hours per week, 1/3 on Electronic Records. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • December 8, 2015
  • 01:46 PM
  • 1,558 views

The Dire State of Science in the Muslim World

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Universities and the scientific infrastructures in Muslim-majority countries need to undergo radical reforms if they want to avoid falling by the wayside in a world characterized by major scientific and technological innovations. This is the conclusion reached by Nidhal Guessoum and Athar Osama in their recent commentary "Institutions: Revive universities of the Muslim world", published in the scientific journal Nature. The physics and astronomy professor Guessoum (American University ........ Read more »

  • December 8, 2015
  • 12:05 PM
  • 833 views

Annotating the scholarly literature online

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The Internet irreversibly changed the scholarly literature, the way it is published, assessed, disseminated, read, shared and cited. The peer review process has been evolving as a result of innovations facilitated by the Web. Among them, the post-publication review and open comments on online texts constitute a strong trend. Hypothes.is is an open source initiative that allows sharing openly – or privately – comments from researchers on scientific publications, contributing to their improvem........ Read more »

Perkel, J. (2015) Annotating the scholarly web. Nature, 528(7580), 153-154. DOI: 10.1038/528153a  

  • November 25, 2015
  • 02:13 PM
  • 918 views

How to assess research proposals?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The peer review of research proposals (grants) aims to judge the merit of projects and researchers and enable the best to be contemplated. The director of an institution in the United Kingdom shared on Twitter his struggle in evaluating the numerous proposals received and started a discussion forum from which ideas and suggestions emerged. … Read More →... Read more »

Singh Chawla, D. (2015) How to judge scientists’ strengths. Nature, 527(7578), 279-279. DOI: 10.1038/527279f  

  • November 15, 2015
  • 07:00 PM
  • 1,519 views

Critical Thinking Skills: What are They and How Do I Get Them?

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

Critical thinking is often touted as a superior way to confront the issues one faces. But what is critical thinking, really? How is it done?   Can anyone do it, or are Spock-like mental abilities required? Critical thinking is sometimes talked about as a near-mystical skill that exercises untapped parts of your brain. The supposed…
Check out Critical Thinking Skills: What are They and How Do I Get Them?, an original post on Thinker Academy.
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  • November 15, 2015
  • 05:00 PM
  • 913 views

Some Notes on Reductionism

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved: http://guzintamath.com/blog/2015/11/notes-reductionism/

We can and should (and do) avoid the idea that stringing together "nothing but" pieces of content is sufficient to make 'holistic' understanding bubble up as an emergent property of student learning. But equally dubious, and equally unsubscribed, is the idea that learning can be transformed from fragmented to holistic by subtracting something from the experience.... Read more »

  • November 13, 2015
  • 09:43 AM
  • 944 views

Predatory journals: the dark side of Open Access

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Low quality non peer reviewed open access journals called ‘predatory’ compromise the credibility of open access publishing and cause damage to this business model’s reputation. A detailed study analyzes these journals and their publishers, including geographic location and authors’ profile. … Read More →... Read more »

  • November 6, 2015
  • 06:30 PM
  • 935 views

Concept Before Procedure? It Doesn't Matter

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved: http://guzintamath.com/blog/2015/11/conceptual-procedural/

Overall, both longitudinal and experimental studies indicate that procedural knowledge leads to improvements in conceptual knowledge, in addition to vice versa. The relations between the two types of knowledge are bidirectional. It is a myth that it is a "one-way street" from conceptual knowledge to procedural knowledge.... Read more »

  • November 5, 2015
  • 01:25 PM
  • 948 views

Bibliometric indicators of the European scientific production

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Europe brings together many countries leaders in scientific and technological research and has encouraged cooperation programs between institutions, countries and regions to foster competitiveness, impact and relevance in research. A comprehensive study based on bibliometric indices analyzes the scientific output of the region and appraises its contribution to the realization of the European Research Area. … Read More →... Read more »

European Comission. (2015) Analysis of Bibliometric Indicators for European Policies 2000-2013. European Comission. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.2777/194026

  • October 29, 2015
  • 09:36 PM
  • 621 views

Science (which needs communication) first, careers (which need selectivity) later

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Science communication and career advancement via journal publications are too closely intertwined, to the detriment of science. The selectivity of journals slows, hampers, and distorts the communication process. Therefore, the processes of scientific communication and assessment for career advancement should be separated. As a welcome side effect, publishing, particularly publishing with open access, could be very much cheaper than it is currently (and the money saved used for research). …........ Read more »

  • October 29, 2015
  • 07:53 PM
  • 407 views

Formal Guidelines May Improve Resident-Attending Communication in Hospital

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Chadi El Saleeby, MD. MS. Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School Pediatric Hospital Medicine and Pediatric Infectious Disease Units Mass. General Hospital for Children Boston, MA 02114  Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post Formal Guidelines May Improve Resident-Attending Communication in Hospital appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Chadi El Saleeby, MD. MS. (2015) Formal Guidelines May Improve Resident-Attending Communication in Hospital. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • October 29, 2015
  • 05:00 PM
  • 779 views

Conceptual Knowledge Is Important

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Post moved: http://guzintamath.com/blog/2015/10/conceptual-knowledge-important/

Conceptual fraction and proportion knowledge and procedural fraction and proportion knowledge play a major role in understanding individual differences in proportional word problem-solving performance.... Read more »

  • October 23, 2015
  • 04:29 PM
  • 665 views

Taking open access one step further: The role of SciELO in the global publication landscape [originally published in Editage Insights]

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

In this conversation, Abel Packer traces SciELO Program’s growth and talks about the gap in publication standards and processes between developed and developing countries. He also emphasizes the importance of establishing sustainable open access publication models. [Available only in English] … Read More →... Read more »

Abel Packer. (2009) The SciELO Open Access: A Gold Way from the South. Canadian Journal of Higher Education. info:/

  • October 16, 2015
  • 04:00 PM
  • 1,306 views

3 Ways Concept Maps Help You Learn

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

Concept maps are pictures that that show how ideas relate to each other. In a concept map, ideas are represented as nodes, and the relationships between them as links with descriptive labels. Concept maps can be very large and complex—and they can be very small and simple. You can use concept maps to capture, communicate, and simplify…
Check out 3 Ways Concept Maps Help You Learn, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • October 7, 2015
  • 02:20 PM
  • 686 views

The publishing proposal of the Open Library of Humanities [Originally published in The Impact Factor Blog]

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The Open Library of Humanities (openlibhums.org) is no longer a project. On September 28th, 2015 the mega-journal for humanities and the social sciences came into existence, and at the same time a new funding model. … Read More →... Read more »

Eve, M., & Edwards, C. (2015) Opening the Open Library of Humanities. Open Library of Humanities, 1(1). DOI: 10.16995/olh.46  

  • October 1, 2015
  • 12:44 PM
  • 798 views

Project Making Data Count encourages sharing of research data

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Sharing of research data (open data) is increasing in all areas related to scientific research, and it involves authors, journals, publishers, funding agencies, the productive sector and society. In order to encourage authors to provide and reuse datasets, it is paramount to find ways to measure their impact. The initiative ‘Making Data Count’ is efficiently doing this, find out how. … Read More →... Read more »

KRATZ, J. E.,, & STRASSER, C. (2015) Making data count. Scientific Data. DOI: http://dx.org/10.1038/sdata.2015.39  

  • September 30, 2015
  • 10:40 PM
  • 1,427 views

Does more education mean more, or less, religion? It depends whether you take intelligence into account.

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

It’s pretty well established now that there is a statistical connection between intelligence and non-belief. The effect is small, but it’s consistent and has been shown many times. Education, however, is a different matter. Some studies show that educated people are more religious, while others find they are less religious. Now there’s an obvious problem [Read More...]... Read more »

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