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  • July 12, 2012
  • 07:03 AM
  • 1,130 views

On the Frontlines of Wikipedia’s ‘Editorial Wars’

by James in Open Science

It’s often difficult to appreciate the brilliance of Wikipedia. Only eleven years old, this free, collaboratively edited and multilingual encyclopaedia is so ingrained in our everyday experience that, like so many successful cultural products, we now take it for granted. One particular charge that’s grown up with WP concerns its purported inaccuracy. Indeed, anecdotally, I’ve noticed [...]... Read more »

Yasseri T, Sumi R, Rung A, Kornai A, & Kertész J. (2012) Dynamics of conflicts in wikipedia. PloS one, 7(6). PMID: 22745683  

  • July 11, 2012
  • 02:00 PM
  • 1,075 views

Part Three: Welcome to Open Science (an introduction)

by James in Open Science

If I were to crudely cobble together a book on the dissemination of scientific knowledge, then I would probably organise it into three parts. For the first, it would discuss how we evolved from tinkering apes; blindly and, at times, consciously experimenting with various technologies and methods. Over the next few millennia we would see a gradual shift from communal knowledge of tribal communities to the development of writing and its spawning of cultural institutions, such as libraries and univ........ Read more »

Bollen J, Van de Sompel H, Hagberg A, Bettencourt L, Chute R, Rodriguez MA, & Balakireva L. (2009) Clickstream data yields high-resolution maps of science. PloS one, 4(3). PMID: 19277205  

  • May 17, 2012
  • 12:26 PM
  • 1,001 views

Genomics, Open Access, and China

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

The associate editor of the journal Genomics has resigned, stating that he can no longer work for a system that puts profit over access to research. In an article in The Guardian, Winston Hide announced his resignation from “system that provides solid profits for the publisher while effectively denying colleagues in developing countries access to [...]... Read more »

Miller RD, Phillips MS, Jo I, Donaldson MA, Studebaker JF, Addleman N, Alfisi SV, Ankener WM, Bhatti HA, Callahan CE.... (2005) High-density single-nucleotide polymorphism maps of the human genome. Genomics, 86(2), 117-26. PMID: 15961272  

  • April 24, 2012
  • 08:42 PM
  • 1,245 views

The post-journal era

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Most of the scholarly publication today goes more or less like this: a scientist writes a manuscript about research funded by her university and/or the grant fairy (usually a government agency) then submits it to a commercial peer-review journal. An editor (either working for free or for "honorarium") reads her manuscript and sends it to appropriate peer reviewers (payment? what payment?). Then, if her manuscript is accepted, her institute's library gets the privilege of buying access to the pub........ Read more »

Priem, J., & Hemminger, B. (2012) Decoupling the scholarly journal. Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience. DOI: 10.3389/fncom.2012.00019  

Smith, J. W. T. (2003) The deconstructed journal revisited: a review of developments. ICCC/IFIP Conference on Electronic Publishing-ElPub03: From information to knowledge. (Minho, Portugal). info:/

  • April 2, 2012
  • 09:04 AM
  • 1,653 views

Open Data Manchester: Twenty Four Hour Data People

by Duncan Hull in O'Really?

According to Francis Maude, Open Data is the “next industrial revolution”. Now you should obviously take everything politicians say with a large pinch of salt (especially Maude) but despite the political hyperbole, when it comes to data he is onto something.... Read more »

  • March 21, 2012
  • 01:00 AM
  • 2,030 views

Chinese Dam Building Tests Southeast Asian Resilience

by Matthew Garcia in Hydro-Logic

China’s hydropower development activities on the Mekong and Salween Rivers are a clear illustration of the country’s potentially destabilizing strategy, with both diplomatic and environmental impacts, in Southeast Asia...... Read more »

  • February 20, 2012
  • 08:38 AM
  • 1,415 views

Phonemic Diversity and Vanishing Phonemes: Looking for Alternative Hypotheses

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

In my last post on the vanishing phonemes debate I briefly mentioned Atkinson’s two major theoretical points: (i) that there is a link between phoneme inventory sizes, mechanisms of cultural transmission and the underlying demographic processes supporting these changes; (ii) we could develop a Serial Founder Effect (SFE) model from Africa based on the phoneme [...]... Read more »

  • December 24, 2011
  • 09:44 PM
  • 1,159 views

Look who’s talking now, but be careful

by Daniel Mietchen in Wikimedian in Residence on Open Science

So far, none of the Open Access Files of the Day had sound, not even the two videos amongst them. This fits into the wider picture of multimedia being neglected in the scientific corners of Wikimedia projects, or in terms of reuse … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 14, 2011
  • 06:37 AM
  • 4,390 views

Science without journals: More evidence that journal rank is a poor predictor of citations

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

In response to my last post, Dwight Kravitz from the NIH alerted me to his paper on a similar topic: Toward a new model of scientific publishing: discussion and a proposal. His paper contains some very interesting data, such as this analysis of citations and journal rank:The left-skewed form of the data is of course nothing new, but their analysis of how predictive journal rank is for actual citations opens a new aspect, I think:Our evaluation reveals that far from a perfect filter, the distr........ Read more »

  • December 13, 2011
  • 11:36 AM
  • 1,373 views

On reproducibility in modeling

by The Curious Wavefunction in The Curious Wavefunction

A recent issue of Science has an article discussing an issue that has been a constant headache for anyone involved with any kind of modeling in drug discovery - the lack of reproducibility in computational science. The author Roger Peng who is a biostatistician at Johns Hopkins talks about modeling standards in general but I think many of his caveats could apply to drug discovery modeling. The problem has been recognized for a few years now but there have been very few concerted efforts to addre........ Read more »

  • December 12, 2011
  • 01:16 PM
  • 4,989 views

Best Test for Diagnosing Alzheimer's Dementia

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

PET Image Normal Definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from other forms of dementia is a complex clinical challenge.  Positron imaging tomography (PET) scans are widely available in the United States.  A more recent approach has used the estimation of brain amyloid levels using an amyloid ligand Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB).  PiB imaging is primarily a research tool at the present.I have previously summarized some of the research related to PiB imaging from a lectur........ Read more »

Rabinovici GD, Rosen HJ, Alkalay A, Kornak J, Furst AJ, Agarwal N, Mormino EC, O'Neil JP, Janabi M, Karydas A.... (2011) Amyloid vs FDG-PET in the differential diagnosis of AD and FTLD. Neurology, 77(23), 2034-42. PMID: 22131541  

  • December 7, 2011
  • 07:02 PM
  • 1,376 views

The Dutch Paradox: Unintended Pregnancy and Induced Abortion in the Netherlands 1954-2002

by Rense Nieuwenhuis in Curving Normality

The Dutch Paradox of abortion entails the observation that in the Netherlands induced abortion is legal, safe, available, and free, but also extremely rare compared to other countries. A new publication in the European Sociological Review, authored by Mark Levels (corresponding author), Ariana Need, Rense Nieuwenhuis (that’s me), Roderick Sluiter, and Wout Ultee, examines the effect of both individual and societal effects on women’s decision process leading to an abortion. ... Read more »

Levels, M., Need, A., Nieuwenhuis, R., Sluiter, R., & Ultee, W. (2010) Unintended Pregnancy and Induced Abortion in the Netherlands 1954-2002. European Sociological Review. DOI: 10.1093/esr/jcq065  

  • December 5, 2011
  • 12:47 PM
  • 1,374 views

Techie Ecstasy: Preview of SIGGRAPH Asia 2011

by Nsikan Akpan in That's Basic Science

Highlights from the forthcoming tech fest SIGGRAPH Asia 2011

1) An Iphone app that writes your autobiography from internet posts

2) A Cartography graphics tool for cardiologists

3) A Renaissance collage generator.

Plus a video of some great rendering software innovations.... Read more »

Zhu, B., Iwata, M., Haraguchi, R., Ashihara, T., Umetani, N., Igarashi, T., & Nakazawa, K. (2011) Sketch-based Dynamic Illustration of Fluid Systems. ACM Transactions on Graphics, 30(6), 1. DOI: 10.1145/2070781.2024168  

Huang, H., Zhang, L., & Zhang, H. (2011) Arcimboldo-like collage using internet images. ACM Transactions on Graphics, 30(6), 1. DOI: 10.1145/2070781.2024189  

  • November 29, 2011
  • 11:50 AM
  • 896 views

Research data should be appropriately licensed with re-use in mind

by ross.mounce in Ross Mounce's blog

I’m really pleased this new Open Access paper has just been published. Hagedorn, G. et al. Creative commons licenses and the non-commercial condition: Implications for the re-use of biodiversity information 150, 127-149 (2011). Some background… After parading my Open Data … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 21, 2011
  • 04:22 PM
  • 926 views

Why speeding neutrinos are interesting for social scientists

by Rense Nieuwenhuis in Curving Normality

In the world as we understand it, based on Einstein, nothing can go faster than light. This prediction based on the general theory of relativity has proven itself countless times in empirical research. And now, lo and behold, a group at CERN has observed neutrino’s racing through earth from France/Switzerland to Italy at the World-record breaking speed of slightly above light-speed!... Read more »

The OPERA Collaboraton: T. Adam et al. (2011) Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA detector in the CNGS beam. Arxiv. arXiv: 1109.4897v2

  • November 17, 2011
  • 07:42 AM
  • 1,044 views

The reluctance of science to open up

by Joerg Heber in All That Matters

I finally had the chance to read Michael Nielsen‘s book ‘Reinventing discovery‘ - a must read for anyone interested in scientific discovery. Why? Well, because the closed, individual way in which we organize science today in many ways is hampering progress and may eventually become a thing of the past. If you are in science, why did you [...]... Read more »

Hardin, G. (1968) The Tragedy of the Commons. Science, 162(3859), 1243-1248. DOI: 10.1126/science.162.3859.1243  

  • October 27, 2011
  • 12:30 PM
  • 1,790 views

Brain White Matter Changes Increase Dementia Risk

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Diffuse White Matter Hyperintentsity in CADASILApproximately a year ago, I reviewed some of the growing evidence of the clinical significance of brain white matter intensities or lesions.  Magnetic resonance imaging identifies these types of lesions but their significance had been unknown.The review noted that white matter hyperintensities appear to increase future risk for several disorders including stroke and dementia.  Additionally, these lesions have increase mortality rates in so........ Read more »

Inaba M, White L, Bell C, Chen R, Petrovitch H, Launer L, Abbott RD, Ross GW, & Masaki K. (2011) White matter lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging scan and 5-year cognitive decline: the Honolulu-Asia aging study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 59(8), 1484-9. PMID: 21718274  

  • October 24, 2011
  • 08:38 AM
  • 1,162 views

Scientists release most accurate simulation of the universe to date

by United Academics in United Academics

The Bolshoi supercomputer simulation, is the most accurate and detailed large cosmological simulation run to date (“bolshoi” is the Russian word for “great” or “grand”), giving physicists and astronomers a powerful new tool for understanding such cosmic mysteries as galaxy formation, dark matter, and dark energy.... Read more »

A. Klypin, S. Trujillo-Gomez, & J. Primack. (2010) Halos and galaxies in the standard cosmological model: results from the Bolshoi simulation. Xavi.org. arXiv: 1002.3660v4

Sebastian Trujillo-Gomez, Anatoly Klypin, Joel Primack, & Aaron J. Romanowsky. (2010) Galaxies in LCDM with Halo Abundance Matching: luminosity-velocity relation, baryonic mass-velocity relation, velocity function and clustering. Arxiv.org. arXiv: 1005.1289v3

  • October 24, 2011
  • 08:31 AM
  • 1,135 views

Scientists release most accurate simulation of the universe to date

by Gijs van der Klei in UA

The Bolshoi supercomputer simulation, is the most accurate and detailed large cosmological simulation run to date (“bolshoi” is the Russian word for “great” or “grand”), giving physicists and astronomers a powerful new tool for understanding such cosmic mysteries as galaxy formation, dark matter, and dark energy. The simulation traces the evolution of the large-scale structure [...]... Read more »

A. Klypin, S. Trujillo-Gomez, & J. Primack. (2010) Halos and galaxies in the standard cosmological model: results from the Bolshoi simulation. Xavi.org. arXiv: 1002.3660v4

Sebastian Trujillo-Gomez, Anatoly Klypin, Joel Primack, & Aaron J. Romanowsky. (2010) Galaxies in LCDM with Halo Abundance Matching: luminosity-velocity relation, baryonic mass-velocity relation, velocity function and clustering. Arxiv.org. arXiv: 1005.1289v3

  • October 19, 2011
  • 08:26 AM
  • 1,937 views

Amount of Facebook friends is reflected in human brain structure

by United Academics in United Academics

In Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, British and Danish researchers stress that the relationship between the amount of Facebook friends and human brain structure is a correlation-not a causal relationship. In other words, it has not been shown that by adding more Facebook friend, your brain will grow in size.... Read more »

R. Kanai, B. Bahrami, R. Roylance, & G. Rees. (2011) Online social network size is reflected in human brain structure. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. info:/

Bickart KC, Wright CI, Dautoff RJ, Dickerson BC, & Barrett LF. (2011) Amygdala volume and social network size in humans. Nature neuroscience, 14(2), 163-4. PMID: 21186358  

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