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All posts; Tags Include "Cognitive Psychology"

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  • October 27, 2014
  • 10:20 AM
  • 941 views

Focusing on the Past or Future Shapes Spatial Perception of Time

by amikulak in Daily Observations

We often think about the future as being in front of us and the past as being at our back – as we walk, places we pass are behind us, […]... Read more »

  • October 26, 2014
  • 10:18 PM
  • 642 views

Using neuroimaging to expose the unconscious influences of priming

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

In 1996, a group of researchers at NYU conducted an interesting experiment. First, they had NYU students work on unscrambling letters to form words. Unbeknownst to the students, they had been split up into three groups, and each group unscrambled letters that formed slightly different words. One group unscrambled words with a "rude" connotation like aggressively, bold, and interrupt. Another group unscrambled "polite" words like considerate, patiently, and respect. And the third group unscramble........ Read more »

Schacter, D., Wig, G., & Stevens, W. (2007) Reductions in cortical activity during priming. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 17(2), 171-176. DOI: 10.1016/j.conb.2007.02.001  

  • October 20, 2014
  • 04:21 PM
  • 1,605 views

Moral Time: Does Our Internal Clock Influence Moral Judgments?

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Does morality depend on the time of the day? The study "The Morning Morality Effect: The Influence of Time of Day on Unethical Behavior" published in October of 2013 by Maryam Kouchaki and Isaac Smith suggested that people are more honest in the mornings, and that their ability to resist the temptation of lying and cheating wears off as the day progresses. In a series of experiments, Kouchaki and Smith found that moral awareness and self-control in their study subjects decreased in the........ Read more »

  • October 20, 2014
  • 11:59 AM
  • 928 views

Does Literary Fiction Challenge Racial Stereotypes?

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Reading literary fiction can be highly pleasurable, but does it also make you a better person? Conventional wisdom and intuition lead us to believe that reading can indeed improve us. However, as the philosopher Emrys Westacott has recently pointed out in his essay for 3Quarksdaily, we may overestimate the capacity of literary fiction to foster moral improvement. A slew of scientific studies have taken on the task of studying the impact of literary fiction on our emotions and thoughts. Some of t........ Read more »

Johnson, D., Huffman, B., & Jasper, D. (2014) Changing Race Boundary Perception by Reading Narrative Fiction. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 36(1), 83-90. DOI: 10.1080/01973533.2013.856791  

  • October 14, 2014
  • 11:30 AM
  • 938 views

Vampire Diaries: Tales of Sleep

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers at UPENN have done gene profiles of blood taken from subjects sensitive or resistant to sleep deprivation. Is the blood gaining some street cred in neuroscience?... Read more »

Arnardottir, E., Nikonova, E., Shockley, K., Podtelezhnikov, A., Anafi, R., Tanis, K., Maislin, G., Stone, D., Renger, J., Winrow, C.... (2014) Blood-Gene Expression Reveals Reduced Circadian Rhythmicity in Individuals Resistant to Sleep Deprivation. SLEEP. DOI: 10.5665/sleep.4064  

  • October 13, 2014
  • 07:59 AM
  • 1,463 views

The Psychology of Procrastination: How We Create Categories of the Future

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

A fully rational approach to task completion would involve creating a priority list of tasks based on a composite score of task importance and the remaining time until the deadline. The most important task with the most proximate deadline would have to be tackled first, and the lowest priority task with the furthest deadline last. This sounds great in theory, but it is quite difficult to implement. A substantial amount of research has been conducted to understand how our moods, distractability a........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2014
  • 09:43 AM
  • 884 views

Dyslexia: trouble reading ‘four’

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Dyslexia affects about every tenth reader. It shows up when trying to read, especially when reading fast. But it is still not fully clear what words dyslexic readers find particularly hard. So, I did some research to find out, and I published the article today. Imagine seeing a new word ‘bour’. How would you pronounce […]... Read more »

  • September 25, 2014
  • 05:26 PM
  • 833 views

Hearing the Islamic Call to Prayer encourages Muslims to cheat less

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

People placed in religious environments tend to act more morally – but what, exactly, triggers this behavioural shift? There’s been a few recent studies which I think are really interesting, because they begin to reveal the importance of culture. In the first set of studies, Mark Aveyard at the (American University of Sharjah, United Arab [Read More...]

... Read more »

  • September 22, 2014
  • 04:45 PM
  • 21 views

How to Tap the Advantages of Being Bicultural

by Louise Rasmussen in Global Cognition

There are numerous advantages of being bicultural. Studies have shown that biculturals are more creative and enjoy greater professional success. One reason for the many advantages of being bicultural is that exposure to diverse beliefs and worldviews enables biculturals to consider different perspectives. This can help them come up with new ways to solve problems […]
Check out How to Tap the Advantages of Being Bicultural, an original post on Global Cognition.
... Read more »

  • September 22, 2014
  • 04:45 PM
  • 1,079 views

If You’re Bicultural, You Can Make it Work to Your Advantage

by Louise Rasmussen in Global Cognition

There are many advantages to being bicultural. Studies have shown that biculturals are more creative and enjoy greater professional success. One of the reasons for the advantage may be that exposure to diverse beliefs and worldviews enables biculturals to consider different perspectives. This can help them come up with new ways to solve problems and […]... Read more »

  • September 15, 2014
  • 09:49 AM
  • 1,064 views

Great Apes Share Our Ability to Predict Goal-Oriented Actions

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Within a year after birth, human infants develop the ability to direct their attention to the anticipated goal of another person’s movement, before it has occurred.  So, for example, our […]... Read more »

  • September 9, 2014
  • 09:49 PM
  • 752 views

Prejudice in the brain

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Despite the great strides that have been made toward a more egalitarian society in the United States over the past 50 years, events like what occurred in Ferguson last month are a bleak reminder of the racial tensions that still exist here. Of course, the United States is not alone in this respect; throughout the world we can see abundant examples of strain between different races, as well as between any groups with dissimilar characteristics. In fact, it seems that the quickness with which we f........ Read more »

  • September 9, 2014
  • 12:53 AM
  • 985 views

The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know Them

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

You [lawyers] have interests.  Interests provide us potent motivation for goal-oriented behavior.  We should not ignore them because interests, a very important individual difference trait variable, “are powerful predictors of educational and career choice, performance, and success”.  A recent review of psychological science literature by leading scholars provides a concise summary of current knowledge [...]
The post The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know The........ Read more »

Rounds, J., & Su, R. (2014) The Nature and Power of Interests. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(2), 98-103. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414522812  

  • September 8, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,169 views

I’ll Wager That You Bet On Football, Or Maybe Football

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Betting on American football and football proper is a trillion dollar a year industry. Why do only 4% of gamblers become addicted. Some of it is actually due to the games themselves. New research is showing that a belief in your knowledge of the game and the “near miss” wherein you almost win your bet, are strong factors in dopamine signaling in the reward centers of the brain.... Read more »

Anselme P, & Robinson MJ. (2013) What motivates gambling behavior? Insight into dopamine's role. Frontiers in behavioral neuroscience, 182. PMID: 24348355  

Huberfeld R, Gersner R, Rosenberg O, Kotler M, & Dannon PN. (2013) Football gambling three arm-controlled study: gamblers, amateurs and laypersons. Psychopathology, 46(1), 28-33. PMID: 22890307  

Khazaal Y, Chatton A, Billieux J, Bizzini L, Monney G, Fresard E, Thorens G, Bondolfi G, El-Guebaly N, Zullino D.... (2012) Effects of expertise on football betting. Substance abuse treatment, prevention, and policy, 18. PMID: 22578101  

Zhou K, Tang H, Sun Y, Huang GH, Rao LL, Liang ZY, & Li S. (2012) Belief in luck or in skill: which locks people into gambling?. Journal of gambling studies / co-sponsored by the National Council on Problem Gambling and Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial Gaming, 28(3), 379-91. PMID: 21894576  

Grötsch P, Lange C, Wiesbeck GA, & Lang U. (2013) Pathological Gambling Induced by Dopamine Antagonists: A Case Report. Journal of gambling studies / co-sponsored by the National Council on Problem Gambling and Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial Gaming. PMID: 24356928  

  • September 8, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 834 views

Does Face-to-Face Interaction Promote Honesty?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

I listen to a lot of audiobooks while traveling. But sometimes I want something less lengthy than a full book and so I turn to podcasts. Recently, I was on a plane and turned on an episode of the NPR TED Radio Hour podcast on Why We Lie. It’s an interesting and wide-ranging look at […]

Related posts:
Never trust a man with a wide face
I can tell from your face that you are suicidal
A law firm’s financial success & the managing partners’ face


... Read more »

  • September 5, 2014
  • 12:34 AM
  • 1,061 views

Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Can lawyers learn about its distinct components, and practice a process which involves interrelated components of attention regulation, body awareness, emotion regulation, and change in perspective on the self, and reach higher levels of self-compassion and well-being?  Stated another way, the question asks  “Can lawyers learn and practice mindfulness meditation?”  The short answer is [...]
The post Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers appeared first on Psycholawlogy.
... Read more »

  • September 2, 2014
  • 05:39 PM
  • 1,050 views

Supernatural believers see minds at work behind random patterns

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

“Theory of Mind” is the term used to describe the mental ability to put yourself inside the mind of someone else – to imagine what it is that they are thinking. Recently, there’s been some evidence that people who do not have a strong theory of mind are more likely to be atheists. For example, [Read More...]

... Read more »

  • September 1, 2014
  • 09:24 PM
  • 870 views

The neuroscience of self-control

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

In the 1960s, a psychologist at Stanford named Walter Mischel began a series of experiments exploring the dynamics of self-control in children. In one such experiment, Mischel gave preschoolers the choice between two outcomes, one of which was clearly preferable. For example, they were able to choose between 2 marshmallows and 1 marshmallow (the experiments became known as the Stanford marshmallow experiments for this reason).But there was a catch. The experimenter would tell the children that h........ Read more »

Inzlicht, M., Legault, L., & Teper, R. (2014) Exploring the Mechanisms of Self-Control Improvement. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(4), 302-307. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414534256  

  • August 27, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,130 views

Just how diverse is this group, really?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We often make assumptions when discussing diversity that we all perceive a group’s diversity in the same way. Today’s research shows that simply isn’t so. That is, you and I (depending on our racial in-group) can look at the same group and you might say it is diverse while I say it is not. What […]

Related posts:
Improving working relationships in your ethnically diverse jury
Religion, ethnicity and Asian-American’s voting patterns
Proof we don’t hire the most qualified candid........ Read more »

  • August 25, 2014
  • 02:39 AM
  • 939 views

Autobiographical Memory for a Life-Threatening Airline Disaster

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

“My attention shifts to the fact that the comforting engine hum is eerily gone. Where has the comforting hum of the engines gone. Something has gone very, very wrong, the plane continued to shake.” -Daniel Goncalves, recalling the terror of Air Transat Flight 236I'm sitting here in an airport, reading a harrowing first person account of Air Transat Flight 236, which fell out of the sky when it lost all power on Aug. 24, 2001.The plane was bound from Toronto, Ontario to Lisbon, Portugal........ Read more »

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