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All posts; Tags Include "Cognitive Psychology"

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  • November 24, 2014
  • 11:19 PM
  • 890 views

JUST PUBLISHED: Not Just Pineapple and Water: How do People Integrate Information from Multiple Sources?

by Mark Rubin in The University of Newcastle's School of Psychology Newsline

When choosing a restaurant for a dinner with friends we need to combine information prior to decision, concerning the location, menu, and price range. Similarly, when crossing a busy road, we sometimes need to integrate information from multiple sources, such as horn sounds and the sight of approaching cars. A recent paper published by myself and colleagues does not tell you which restaurant to choose for your party or how to safely cross the road. Rather, it provides a means for evaluating how ........ Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 930 views

Thin-slicing infidelity: Brief observation can reveal more than you ever thought!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Our clients are routinely stunned by the accuracy of  mock juror impressions of witnesses and parties based on a 6 to 8 minute video clip from depositions. Mock jurors quickly assess character and are often eager to share their insights. Their comments can be insightful, surprising, and sometimes biting in their judgments. So, okay. It’s […]

Related posts:
Unfaithful partner? Would you rather be seen as mature– or as competent and strong?
A law firm’s financial success & the ........ Read more »

  • November 21, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 848 views

The “euphemism treadmill”: Is it African-American or Black?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

It’s a constantly moving target. Just over a year ago, we wrote about this on-going question and cited a Gallup Poll saying 65% of Black Americans have no preference when it comes to labels used to describe their racial or ethnic group. The authors of today’s research article would disagree. They say there are consequences […]

Related posts:
Should we say Black or African-American? Latino or Hispanic?
Everyday racism: A comparison of African American and Asian American Women
Are you........ Read more »

Hall, EV, Phillips, KW, & Townsend, SSM. (2014) A rose by any other name? The consequences of subtyping “African-Americans” from “Blacks”. . Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. . info:/

  • November 19, 2014
  • 03:43 PM
  • 1,266 views

Religious and paranormal believers are high in empathy – but confused about how the world works

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

There’s a strand of thought that says that belief in the supernatural is founded upon a misunderstanding of how the world works (see: You either believe in it all, or you don’t). On the other hand, there’s another perspective that says the cognitive problem is with the atheists. Belief in gods, according to this school [Read More...]

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  • November 18, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,204 views

This Is Your TV On Drugs

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

There are more than 100 drug commercials on TV every hour of every day. Why? Because they work. Research shows that advertised drugs are prescribed 9x more than comparable drugs that aren’t advertised. And all those side effect notices? The drug companies like them because research says that all you remember is that they were “honest” with you.... Read more »

  • November 13, 2014
  • 03:36 AM
  • 861 views

JUST PUBLISHED: Does Playing Action Video Games Really Improve Your Information Processing?

by Mark Rubin in The University of Newcastle's School of Psychology Newsline

Over the last decade, a number of studies have been published that suggest that playing action video games improves performance on sensory, perceptual, and attentional tasks. For instance, Green, Pouget, and Bavelier (2010) found that playing action video games led to faster information processing, reduced response caution, and no difference in motor responding. These and related findings are sufficiently hot right now that they often make it to popular science outlets like Ted talks (for exampl........ Read more »

van Ravenzwaaij, D., Boekel, W., Forstmann, B. U., Ratcliff, R., & Wagenmakers, E. J. (2014) Action video games do not improve the speed of information processing in simple perceptual tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143(5), 1794-805. PMID: 24933517  

  • November 10, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 779 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The “halo of scientific validity” effect

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written about the lack of evidence for the much-feared “CSI Effect”. But here’s an interesting study about the simple “appearance of science” as opposed to the bells and whistles of high-tech “CSI”-like evidence. All it takes is the use of “scientese” (scientific sounding words)–not to be confused with “lawyerese” (which we wrote about here […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: Educating jurors about science may have no effect
Simple Jury Persuasi........ Read more »

  • November 7, 2014
  • 09:01 AM
  • 869 views

You can tell a lot from looking at someone’s face…

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Our mock jurors (and many others as well) tend to believe the eyes are the “window to the soul” and that by simply looking at the eyes of another, they can intuit truthfulness and character. But it can be even easier! Just look at the face and you can actually assess introversion/extroversion, competence/incompetence, dominance/submission, and […]

Related posts:
I can tell from your face that you are suicidal
Never trust a man with a wide face
Wearing your religion on your face


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Olivola, C., Funk, F., & Todorov, A. (2014) Social attributions from faces bias human choices. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 18(11), 566-570. DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2014.09.007  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 10:30 AM
  • 781 views

Neury Thursday: Sleep and the Blood Brain Barrier, with some hesitation

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers found that the permeability of the blood brain barrier is compromised with chronic sleep deprivation. However, the methods section brings these findings into question. Scientists, do your job and make those methods detailed. ... Read more »

He, J., Hsuchou, H., He, Y., Kastin, A., Wang, Y., & Pan, W. (2014) Sleep Restriction Impairs Blood-Brain Barrier Function. Journal of Neuroscience, 34(44), 14697-14706. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2111-14.2014  

  • November 2, 2014
  • 08:27 PM
  • 936 views

Decision Making - Monkey See, Monkey Do (But Not Like a Human)

by Mark Rubin in The University of Newcastle's School of Psychology Newsline

A great deal is known about how we make simple decisions, right down to the way neurons in our brains connect to translate the things we sense into the responses we make. Some of the most important neural studies of decision-making have used monkeys as an analogue for humans. The broader scope of methodology which can be used with primates has provided information far beyond that obtainable from human experimentation. However, conclusions based on animal experiments may not always translate to h........ Read more »

Cassey, P., Heathcote, A., & Brown, S. (2014) Brain and Behavior in Decision-Making. PLoS Computational Biology, 10(7), 1-7. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003700  

  • October 27, 2014
  • 10:20 AM
  • 973 views

Focusing on the Past or Future Shapes Spatial Perception of Time

by amikulak in Daily Observations

We often think about the future as being in front of us and the past as being at our back – as we walk, places we pass are behind us, […]... Read more »

  • October 26, 2014
  • 10:18 PM
  • 671 views

Using neuroimaging to expose the unconscious influences of priming

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

In 1996, a group of researchers at NYU conducted an interesting experiment. First, they had NYU students work on unscrambling letters to form words. Unbeknownst to the students, they had been split up into three groups, and each group unscrambled letters that formed slightly different words. One group unscrambled words with a "rude" connotation like aggressively, bold, and interrupt. Another group unscrambled "polite" words like considerate, patiently, and respect. And the third group unscramble........ Read more »

Schacter, D., Wig, G., & Stevens, W. (2007) Reductions in cortical activity during priming. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 17(2), 171-176. DOI: 10.1016/j.conb.2007.02.001  

  • October 20, 2014
  • 04:21 PM
  • 1,652 views

Moral Time: Does Our Internal Clock Influence Moral Judgments?

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Does morality depend on the time of the day? The study "The Morning Morality Effect: The Influence of Time of Day on Unethical Behavior" published in October of 2013 by Maryam Kouchaki and Isaac Smith suggested that people are more honest in the mornings, and that their ability to resist the temptation of lying and cheating wears off as the day progresses. In a series of experiments, Kouchaki and Smith found that moral awareness and self-control in their study subjects decreased in the........ Read more »

  • October 20, 2014
  • 11:59 AM
  • 985 views

Does Literary Fiction Challenge Racial Stereotypes?

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Reading literary fiction can be highly pleasurable, but does it also make you a better person? Conventional wisdom and intuition lead us to believe that reading can indeed improve us. However, as the philosopher Emrys Westacott has recently pointed out in his essay for 3Quarksdaily, we may overestimate the capacity of literary fiction to foster moral improvement. A slew of scientific studies have taken on the task of studying the impact of literary fiction on our emotions and thoughts. Some of t........ Read more »

Johnson, D., Huffman, B., & Jasper, D. (2014) Changing Race Boundary Perception by Reading Narrative Fiction. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 36(1), 83-90. DOI: 10.1080/01973533.2013.856791  

  • October 14, 2014
  • 11:30 AM
  • 983 views

Vampire Diaries: Tales of Sleep

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers at UPENN have done gene profiles of blood taken from subjects sensitive or resistant to sleep deprivation. Is the blood gaining some street cred in neuroscience?... Read more »

Arnardottir, E., Nikonova, E., Shockley, K., Podtelezhnikov, A., Anafi, R., Tanis, K., Maislin, G., Stone, D., Renger, J., Winrow, C.... (2014) Blood-Gene Expression Reveals Reduced Circadian Rhythmicity in Individuals Resistant to Sleep Deprivation. SLEEP. DOI: 10.5665/sleep.4064  

  • October 13, 2014
  • 07:59 AM
  • 1,497 views

The Psychology of Procrastination: How We Create Categories of the Future

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

A fully rational approach to task completion would involve creating a priority list of tasks based on a composite score of task importance and the remaining time until the deadline. The most important task with the most proximate deadline would have to be tackled first, and the lowest priority task with the furthest deadline last. This sounds great in theory, but it is quite difficult to implement. A substantial amount of research has been conducted to understand how our moods, distractability a........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2014
  • 09:43 AM
  • 911 views

Dyslexia: trouble reading ‘four’

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Dyslexia affects about every tenth reader. It shows up when trying to read, especially when reading fast. But it is still not fully clear what words dyslexic readers find particularly hard. So, I did some research to find out, and I published the article today. Imagine seeing a new word ‘bour’. How would you pronounce […]... Read more »

  • September 25, 2014
  • 05:26 PM
  • 862 views

Hearing the Islamic Call to Prayer encourages Muslims to cheat less

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

People placed in religious environments tend to act more morally – but what, exactly, triggers this behavioural shift? There’s been a few recent studies which I think are really interesting, because they begin to reveal the importance of culture. In the first set of studies, Mark Aveyard at the (American University of Sharjah, United Arab [Read More...]

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  • September 22, 2014
  • 04:45 PM
  • 49 views

How to Tap the Advantages of Being Bicultural

by Louise Rasmussen in Global Cognition

There are numerous advantages of being bicultural. Studies have shown that biculturals are more creative and enjoy greater professional success. One reason for the many advantages of being bicultural is that exposure to diverse beliefs and worldviews enables biculturals to consider different perspectives. This can help them come up with new ways to solve problems […]
Check out How to Tap the Advantages of Being Bicultural, an original post on Global Cognition.
... Read more »

  • September 22, 2014
  • 04:45 PM
  • 1,106 views

If You’re Bicultural, You Can Make it Work to Your Advantage

by Louise Rasmussen in Global Cognition

There are many advantages to being bicultural. Studies have shown that biculturals are more creative and enjoy greater professional success. One of the reasons for the advantage may be that exposure to diverse beliefs and worldviews enables biculturals to consider different perspectives. This can help them come up with new ways to solve problems and […]... Read more »

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