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All posts; Tags Include "Cognitive Psychology"

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  • August 31, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 586 views

Talking about climate change without  knee-jerk responses from listeners

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We recently posted new research on the secret to combatting distrust of science. Now we have more research on how to talk about climate change without setting off automatic and defensive reactions from listeners. Not many of our readers are going to be litigating climate change issues, but the challenge of discussing complex scientific issues […]

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How can I convince them this wasn’t racist? Just keep talking…
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Are conse........ Read more »

  • August 25, 2015
  • 03:13 PM
  • 983 views

Microbes and the mind: Who's pulling the strings?

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

There are many examples throughout nature of microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, and parasites influencing the neurobiology and behavior of their hosts. For example, the rabies virus enters the nervous system almost immediately after a bite or scratch and travels to the brain, where it influences neural activity to make aggressive behavior more likely. This, of course, is beneficial for the virus as it increases the probability its infected host will make contact with another susceptible host........ Read more »

  • August 21, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 878 views

This and that: The secret to crowdfunding success, cold offices,  and nosy smartphones

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s another collection of interesting tidbits that don’t rate an entire blog post on their own but that we think worthy of mention. Think of them as our contribution to your conversational contributions over dinner, drinks, or to fill that awkward silence that pops up unexpectedly. Be thin, White and attractive for crowdfunding success! It’s […]

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A law firm’s financial success & the managing partners’ face
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  • August 20, 2015
  • 08:01 AM
  • 541 views

Why It’s Important to Have Diversity (in age!) in Your Work Teams

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

If you had to guess, would you say that younger people or older people are better at learning abstract causal principles? When first thinking about this question, I would have thought that older people would be better at this given that … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 17, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 776 views

The Bias Awareness Scale 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s a new way to measure our awareness of our own biases in four easy questions. Yes. Four. We are constantly writing about bias here and when we see ways to measure bias it is usually convoluted or prohibitively expensive, or contains language not suitable for courtroom use. This scale, however, is different—it is short […]

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The Bias Blind Spot Scale 
Is racial bias fueling anti-Obama rhetoric?
The Islamophobia Scale: Measuring our fear of Muslims


... Read more »

  • August 11, 2015
  • 06:42 PM
  • 1,326 views

Intelligence: What it Means to You

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

What does intelligence mean to you? Do you believe you were born with a “smartness score” that’s set for life? Or is intelligence something you can build and grow? Say, by improving your study skills? Now, ask yourself another question – why do you believe that? Where did your ideas about the nature of intelligence…
Check out Intelligence: What it Means to You, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • August 10, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,073 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Do you follow your head or your heart?  

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

And….do you think I can now guess your opinion on abortion? And brain death? It’s like a dream-state voir dire question. Today’s researchers used 8 different studies to explore the relationship between participants identifying with either the head or the heart and the participants’ positions on various hot-button issues. It’s a question that has been […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: When your Muslim female client wears a head-covering
Simple Jury Persuasion: Tilt your........ Read more »

Adam, H, Obodaru, O, & Galinsky, AD. (2015) Who you are is where you are: Antecedents and con sequencing of locating the self in the brain or the heart. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 74-83. info:/

  • August 5, 2015
  • 02:00 AM
  • 1,057 views

The unspeakable in pursuit of the unrepeatable *

by Michael Ramscar in The Importance of Being Wrong

(* with apologies to Oscar Wilde) Replication is never far from the news in psychology these days. Pick up a newspaper or journal, or browse the blogosphere, and chances are you’ll encounter yet another piece on the importance of repeating experiments. Like those people who dress up in period costume and reenact old battles, researchers […]... Read more »

  • August 3, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 651 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Combatting distrust of science  

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

The art of persuasion is often complex and diverse, but today’s study also shows how it can be simple and elegant. Here’s a surprisingly easy way to diminish the automatic, knee-jerk and distrusting reaction to scientific findings. Tell your listeners about scientific consensus. Today’s researchers call consensus a “gateway belief” that results in the ability […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: Educating jurors about science may have no effect
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  • July 31, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 731 views

Workplace rudeness: Death of a thousand cuts 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

It makes sense. If someone is rude to you, you might become grumpy and be rude in response, or rude to those who cross your path in the wake of the mistreatment. You may think of this as a small issue but new research shows us that rude behaviors are actually harmful—and, in fact, as […]

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The Workplace Ostracism Scale: Making the subjective objective?
Fat bias in the workplace
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  • July 26, 2015
  • 11:18 AM
  • 645 views

Stop Wasting Time Abroad: How to Ensure Contact with New Cultures Boosts Your Creativity

by Louise Rasmussen in Global Cognition

Yuck! Splashes of chicken blood and insects fly everywhere. The old Chinese woman waves the butcher knife and squirming corpse triumphantly. She flashes a toothless grin. You’re speechless. Flabbergasted. Grossed out big time. You thought you’d take a leisurely stroll in a quaint out-door market. You expected to see some strange veggies. Marvel at oddly […]
Check out Stop Wasting Time Abroad: How to Ensure Contact with New Cultures Boosts Your Creativity, an original post on Global Cog........ Read more »

  • July 26, 2015
  • 11:18 AM
  • 55 views

How Learning New Cultures Boosts Your Creativity

by Louise Rasmussen in Global Cognition

Yuck! Splashes of chicken blood and insects fly everywhere. The old Chinese woman waves the butcher knife and squirming corpse triumphantly. She flashes a toothless grin. You’re speechless. Flabbergasted. Grossed out big time. You thought you’d take a leisurely stroll in a quaint out-door market. You expected to see some strange veggies. Marvel at oddly […]
Check out How Learning New Cultures Boosts Your Creativity, an original post on Global Cognition.
... Read more »

  • July 23, 2015
  • 07:54 AM
  • 772 views

Choice Architecture: Even in “Heads or Tails,” It Matters What’s Presented First

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

If you’re familiar with behavioural economics, then the results of this study will be right up your alley. The researchers set out to determine whether there was a “first-toss Heads bias.” Meaning, when flipping a coin and the choices are presented “Heads or … Continue reading →... Read more »

Bar-Hillel M, Peer E, & Acquisti A. (2014) "Heads or tails?"--a reachability bias in binary choice. Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition, 40(6), 1656-63. PMID: 24773285  

  • July 20, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 851 views

“I am so tired of people mistaking me for a model!” [#humblebrag]

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Oh the “humblebrag”. It’s really not that long since career counselors were suggesting interview questions asking about weaknesses could be turned to the candidate’s advantage by responding about an alleged weakness that was really a strength. (“Weakness? I think I tend to be perfectionistic. I just can’t send in a report without double-checking it for […]

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  • July 15, 2015
  • 04:09 AM
  • 898 views

Can Tetris Reduce Intrusive Memories of a Trauma Film?

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

For some inexplicable reason, you watched the torture gore horror film Hostel over the weekend. On Monday, you're having trouble concentrating at work. Images of severed limbs and bludgeoned heads keep intruding on your attempts to code or write a paper. So you decide to read about the making of Hostel.You end up seeing pictures of the most horrifying scenes from the movie. It's all way too way much to simply shake off so then you decide to play Tetris. But a funny thing happens. The unwelcome i........ Read more »

  • July 10, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 664 views

Can you identify racist jurors by asking if they watch local  TV news?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

So here’s a voir dire fantasy: When race is salient to your case, strike for cause all potential jurors who say they watch their local television news. For what cause? Because they’re more likely to be racist—at least according to today’s research. Local news coverage tends to focus on crime according to the researchers and […]

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Arendt, F, & Northup, T. (2015) Effects of long-term exposure to news stereotypes on implicit and explicit attitudes. International Journal of Communication,, 732-751. info:/

  • July 8, 2015
  • 02:52 PM
  • 876 views

Group discussion (think juror deliberation) improves lie  detection

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Want to see a lively argument? Ask a couple of legal professionals if jurors can detect deception in witnesses or parties— and then slowly back away. It’s a hotly debated topic with some saying “jurors usually get it right” and others pointing to reams of research saying no one is a very good lie detector. […]

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Klein N, & Epley N. (2015) Group discussion improves lie detection. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [PNAS], 112(24), 7460-5. PMID: 26015581  

  • July 7, 2015
  • 03:50 PM
  • 1,096 views

The powerful influence of placebos on the brain

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

The term placebo effect describes an improvement in the condition of a patient after being given a placebo--an inert substance (e.g. sugar pill) the patient expects may hold some benefit for him. The placebo effect has long been recognized as an unavoidable aspect of medical treatment. Physicians before the 1950s often took advantage of this knowledge by giving patients treatments like bread pills or injections of water with the understanding that patients had a tendency to feel better when they........ Read more »

  • July 6, 2015
  • 10:00 AM
  • 779 views

Brain Activity of Passengers on Terrifying Flight Sheds Light on Trauma Memory

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Neuroimaging data collected from a group of passengers who thought they were going to die when their plane ran out of fuel over the Atlantic Ocean in the summer of […]... Read more »

  • July 6, 2015
  • 08:08 AM
  • 522 views

Saving For Retirement — As Simple As Counting in Days

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

A few years ago, I wrote a post about the problems with saying “I’ll be ready in 5 minutes.” It turns out, there’s now research that — in a way — supports the point I was trying to make. In this … Continue reading →... Read more »

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