Post List

All posts; Tags Include "Cognitive Psychology"

(Modify Search »)

  • November 13, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 774 views

Things You Want to Know: Stereotypes, biases,  defensiveness, and when work strikes awfully close to home

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

This is a conglomeration of articles we thought were interesting and useful but chose not to devote an entire post describing them. Think of this as a series of articles that might pique your interest and make you want to learn more. We’ll provide links so it’s easy to learn more. Christians and Science: A […]

Related posts:
Cognitive Biases: A pictorial primer 
Do Whites, Blacks, and Asians have different  biases than Biracial adults?
Have you seen our latest work in The Jury Exp........ Read more »

Phillips, LT, & Lowery, BS. (2015) The hard-knock life? Whites claim hardship in response to racial inequity. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 12-18. info:/

  • November 9, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 541 views

The Generic Conspiracist Beliefs Scale 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

You likely know we love a good conspiracy theorist here. For entertainment value it adds a lot to an otherwise dull story. In fact, one of our favorite blog-moments was when a conspiracy theorist left a raging comment for us regarding a post that questioned the existence of Big Foot. We’ve posted a few scales […]

Related posts:
Conspiracy beliefs and the relation to emotional uncertainty
Is there an effective strategy that reduces a conspiracy  theorist’s intense beliefs?
Measuring........ Read more »

  • November 6, 2015
  • 06:47 AM
  • 1,147 views

Broca’s area processes both music and language at the same time

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

When you read a book and listen to music, the brain doesn’t keep these two tasks nicely separated. In a new article just out, I show that there is a brain area which is busy with both tasks at the same time (Kunert et al., 2015). This brain area might tell us a lot about […]... Read more »

  • November 5, 2015
  • 09:47 PM
  • 1,228 views

Your good deeds are pleasing God? That might impress kids but it doesn’t impress adults!

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

The most magnificent charitable gesture can fall flat if it turns out that you just did it to get a promotion, or get some other kind of pay off. People don’t like it if they think they detect a hidden motive behind apparently charitable behaviour. Last year, research by University of Kentucky psychologist Will Gervais [Read More...]... Read more »

  • October 26, 2015
  • 04:00 AM
  • 1,080 views

Sticks and stones (1): How names work & why they hurt

by Michael Ramscar in The Importance of Being Wrong

Boiling a frog In 1781, Christian Wilhelm von Dohm, a civil servant, political writer and historian in what was then Prussia published a two volume work entitled Über die Bürgerliche Verbesserung der Juden (“On the Civic Improvement of Jews”). In it, von Dohm laid out the case for emancipation for a people systematically denied the […]... Read more »

Fryer, R., & Levitt, S. (2004) The Causes and Consequences of Distinctively Black Names. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 119(3), 767-805. DOI: 10.1162/0033553041502180  

Nunley, J.M., Pugh, A., Romero, N., & Seals, R.A. (2014) An Examination of Racial Discrimination in the Labor Market for Recent College Graduates: Estimates from the Field. Auburn Economics Working Paper Series. info:/

Zajonc, R. (1968) Attitudinal effects of mere exposure. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 9(2), 1-27. DOI: 10.1037/h0025848  

  • October 16, 2015
  • 03:00 PM
  • 1,237 views

3 Ways Concept Maps Help You Learn

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

Concept maps are pictures that that show how ideas relate to each other. In a concept map, ideas are represented as nodes, and the relationships between them as links with descriptive labels. Concept maps can be very large and complex—and they can be very small and simple. You can use concept maps to capture, communicate, and simplify…
Check out 3 Ways Concept Maps Help You Learn, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • October 12, 2015
  • 09:51 PM
  • 1,454 views

What do people think God is actually like?

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

The ancient Greek philosopher Xenophanes once scathingly pointed out that people imagine god to be pretty much like themselves: But mortals suppose that gods are born, wear their own clothes and have a voice and body. Ethiopians say that their gods are snub-nosed and black; Thracians that theirs are are blue-eyed and red-haired. Christian tend [Read More...]... Read more »

  • October 9, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 860 views

Police observers are more observant than ordinary  civilians

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Most research has not shown police to be any more observant than ordinary civilians—even though judges and juries often make assumptions that police witnesses are more reliable than civilian eyewitnesses. New research by Dutch researchers shows that police observers were more aware of details in a drug deal near a hotel which had been recorded […]

Related posts:
Are jurors more skeptical of police on the witness stand now? 
“I can look into his eyes and just tell he is lying”
An ........ Read more »

  • October 8, 2015
  • 12:30 PM
  • 826 views

Neury Thursday: Modeling disrupted sleep in Angelman Syndrome

by Allison in Dormivigilia

This study came out of our group here at Morehouse School of Medicine. It concerns a mouse model of disrupted sleep in Angelman Syndrome. Basically, was it the circadian or homeostatic system that is responsible, or both? It was the homeostatic. ... Read more »

Ehlen, J., Jones, K., Pinckney, L., Gray, C., Burette, S., Weinberg, R., Evans, J., Brager, A., Zylka, M., Paul, K.... (2015) Maternal Ube3a Loss Disrupts Sleep Homeostasis But Leaves Circadian Rhythmicity Largely Intact. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(40), 13587-13598. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2194-15.2015  

  • October 5, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 647 views

Is there an effective strategy that reduces a conspiracy  theorist’s intense beliefs?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

According to new research with a large sample from all across the United States, the answer is yes! If you have read this blog for long, you know we love a good conspiracy theorist and use their idiosyncratic associations in pretrial research to plug holes in case narratives. The researchers briefly review the past literature […]

Related posts:
Conspiracy beliefs and the relation to emotional uncertainty
Would you get sucked in to conspiracy theories?
Think conspiracy theorists live on ........ Read more »

  • September 28, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 870 views

Ten minutes of uninterrupted eye contact causes hallucinations and other important things 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

There are many things we read and discard rather than sharing them (and our take on them) with you, but other things we read and grin and think you might want to know. We’ve described these before as odd facts for sharing over drinks or dinner or around the office. It isn’t the most pivotal […]

Related posts:
“Cultural competency” is important for your financial bottom line
The Donald Trump Effect:  Press coverage can determine public opinion and maybe election outcomes
Things ........ Read more »

  • September 25, 2015
  • 06:25 AM
  • 474 views

Scientists unravel mysteries around rhythm and language

by Cath Jex in Tak Fur The Kaffe

Struggling to learn a language? How are your musical skills? Scientists discover some of the hidden ways in which the two are linked.... Read more »

  • September 23, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 762 views

Who has the deepest voice amongst the Republican  candidates for President?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

I watched the second Republican debate last week after reading two more articles on voice pitch and winning elections. Not coincidentally, I had to struggle to keep from focusing on who had the deepest voice among the candidates. We’ve written about this line of research before and tend to think of it as the Barry […]

Related posts:
Republicans prefer ‘Republican-looking’ political candidates
Feel the power of that deep and resonant voice!
How leaders look: Competent and trustwort........ Read more »

  • September 18, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,243 views

“Gaydar”: Real or plain and simple stereotyping? 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

A study a while back showed ‘above chance’ guessing of sexual orientation based on photographs of faces alone. The results were explained as proof of gaydar. Now, a new study says gaydar is not real and is a way to stereotype others that is seen as more “socially and personally acceptable”. They point to a […]

Related posts:
The Danger of Stereotyping: Does Gay + Black = Likable?
The Libertarian Orientation Scale: Who’s the (real) Libertarian?
Real-life Sopranos: It’s isn’........ Read more »

  • September 15, 2015
  • 09:35 AM
  • 1,592 views

Questioning Improves Your Learning if You Ask the Right Questions

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

It’s 2AM and you’re cramming for a test tomorrow. The Doritos are all gone and yours is the only light still on. You stare at a richly detailed diagram of the reproductive system and think, “Looks pretty straightforward. I’ll remember this tomorrow.” At show time, that detailed diagram is nothing but a fuzzy blur in…
Check out Questioning Improves Your Learning if You Ask the Right Questions, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • September 14, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 641 views

Better signs equals less friction: Why you need a good graphics  person

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s a study about road safety that doesn’t know it’s a nice indication of why litigators need good graphics. We have blogged before about the value of graphics so it’s good to see more research that is so sensible to highlight the value of the visual in the courtroom. Today’s researchers wanted to see which […]

Related posts:
A picture is worth a thousand words…
Surely we are not talking about the same person!
You can improve your litigation advocacy (for free!)


... Read more »

  • September 5, 2015
  • 06:21 AM
  • 1,135 views

Are internal replications the solution to the replication crisis in Psychology? No.

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Most Psychology findings are not replicable. What can be done? Stanford psychologist Michael Frank has an idea : Cumulative study sets with internal replication. ‘If I had to advocate for a single change to practice, this would be it.’ I took a look whether this makes any difference. A recent paper in the journal Science […]... Read more »

  • September 3, 2015
  • 08:28 PM
  • 1,005 views

Reproducibility project: A front row seat

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

A recent paper in Science reports the results of a large-scale effort to test reproducibility in psychological science. The results have caused much discussion (as well they should) in both general public and science forums. I thought I would offer my perspective as the lead author of one of the studies that was included in the reproducibility analysis. I had heard about the project even before being contacted to participate and one of the things that appealed to me about it was that they were t........ Read more »

  • September 3, 2015
  • 06:23 AM
  • 993 views

Why are Psychological findings mostly unreplicable?

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Take 97 psychological effects from top journals which are claimed to be robust. How many will replicate? Brian Nosek and his huge team tried it out and the results were sobering, to say the least. How did we get here? The data give some clues. Sometimes the title of a paper just sounds incredible. Estimating […]... Read more »

  • September 1, 2015
  • 03:30 AM
  • 1,577 views

5 Study Skills to Accelerate Your Learning

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

So much to learn. Will it ever end? Nope. You will be learning for the rest of your life. School is simply a kick starter. No matter what path you take in life after school, learning will be part of it. Yet, the forever journey to develop your talents doesn’t have to be nerve-racking or…
Check out 5 Study Skills to Accelerate Your Learning, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SRI Technology.

To learn more, visit http://selfregulationinstitute.org/.