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  • December 8, 2015
  • 01:50 PM
  • 661 views

Why is progress so slow in resuscitation research?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Why is progress so slow in resuscitation research? A lot of money and time went in to finding out which type of blood-letting ventilation works best – ignoring the absence of valid evidence that ventilation is better than no ventilation. Why not gamble with our patients?

In response to The Fatal Flaw in Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR,[1],[2] Kenny commented that –

there are many things in your blog that are not correct.[1]... Read more »

Nichol, G., Leroux, B., Wang, H., Callaway, C., Sopko, G., Weisfeldt, M., Stiell, I., Morrison, L., Aufderheide, T., Cheskes, S.... (2015) Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509139  

  • December 3, 2015
  • 09:21 AM
  • 538 views

What’s the Answer? (Dare we edit the human race?) #GeneEditSummit

by Mary in OpenHelix

This week’s question is a biggie. And there’s no answer yet. But that is the topic of the National Academies big event this week, International Summit on Human Gene Editing. I have been glued to this for the whole time and didn’t spend much time looking for questions this week. And I’ll be watching the final […]... Read more »

  • December 2, 2015
  • 11:37 AM
  • 439 views

Treatment Guidelines for Problem Gambling

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Basal ganglia may be involving in gambling disorderProblem gambling effects a number of individuals who engage in gambling behavior.Gambling behavior that meets criteria as a Gambling Disorder according to the criteria of DSM-5 includes four or more of the following over a consecutive 12 month period of time:Increased quantity of money gambled to achieve excitementRestlessness/irritability when attempting to cut down gambling behaviorRepeated unsuccessful attempts to cut down or stop gamblingPre........ Read more »

Lee KM, Chan HN, Cheah B, Gentica GF, Guo S, Lim HK, Lim YC, Noorul F, Tan HS, Teo P.... (2011) Ministry of Health clinical practice guidelines: management of gambling disorders. Singapore medical journal, 52(6), 456. PMID: 21732000  

  • November 29, 2015
  • 01:41 PM
  • 713 views

It is possible to develop successful HIV vaccine

by B V Waghmare in HIV virus and antiretroviral drugs and antiAIDS vaccine research and developmets

Antibodies developed in HIV infected individuals do not protect them against further proliferation of HIV, but protect proliferation of HIV in animals.
That means it is possible to develop a vaccine which will completely protect human from HIV infection.... Read more »

B V Waghmare. (2015) HIV Vaccine heading toward success. Combination of HIV neutralizing antibodies and Nanoparticle protien eOD-GT8 60mer are good hope for getting a effective anti HIV vaccine. http://bvwaghmare.blogspot.com. info:/

  • November 25, 2015
  • 10:15 AM
  • 853 views

The Fatal Flaw in Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This is not a study that has a valid control group to determine if there is any benefit from ventilation. There is no group that does not receive ventilations, so it is like a study of one type of blood-letting vs. another type of blood-letting with the researchers taking for granted that blood-letting does improve outcomes. That is not a problem if blood-letting actually improves outcomes.

Should we take it for granted that blood-letting improves outcomes and that the only hypothesis worth s........ Read more »

Nichol, G., Leroux, B., Wang, H., Callaway, C., Sopko, G., Weisfeldt, M., Stiell, I., Morrison, L., Aufderheide, T., Cheskes, S.... (2015) Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509139  

Alldredge BK,, Gelb AM,, Isaacs SM,, Corry MD,, Allen F,, Ulrich S,, Gottwald MD,, O’Neil N,, Neuhaus JM,, Segal MR,.... (2001) A Comparison of Lorazepam, Diazepam, and Placebo for the Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Status Epilepticus. New England Journal of Medicine, 345(25), 1860-1860. DOI: 10.1056/NEJM200112203452521  

  • November 20, 2015
  • 08:37 AM
  • 634 views

Summary of recent kidney cancer clinical trials

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Kidney tumours, if detected early enough, can often be removed surgically without the need for further drug treatments. However, if the primary tumour metastasises traditional chemotherapies and radiotherapies become ineffective and patient survival is limited. In recent years there have been great advances in treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) with several targeted treatments now available. However, these targeted treatments show variable response rates and efficacy. This blo........ Read more »

Motzer RJ, Escudier B, McDermott DF, George S, Hammers HJ, Srinivas S, Tykodi SS, Sosman JA, Procopio G, Plimack ER.... (2015) Nivolumab versus Everolimus in Advanced Renal-Cell Carcinoma. The New England journal of medicine, 373(19), 1803-13. PMID: 26406148  

  • November 18, 2015
  • 01:00 PM
  • 886 views

Predictors of Poor Outcome After Traumatic Brain Injury

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

The outcome following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often unpredictable and variable.Two individuals with similar types of TBI can have quite different outcomes ranging from total disability to functional employment.Torun Finnanger and colleagues from Norway and Australia recently reported on a study that examined a number of predictor variables on self-reported outcome following TBI.In this study, 67 adolescents and adults with moderate to severe TBI completed baseline assessments and were fo........ Read more »

  • November 16, 2015
  • 11:40 AM
  • 876 views

Smell Test in Screening for Parkinson's Disease Risk

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Molecular model of polypeptide parkinIdentification of early or prodromal stages of the diseases of neuroscience medicine is an important clinical and research goal.Identification of prodromal illness allows for enhanced surveillance and initiation of secondary prevention interventions.Impairment of smell or olfactory sensation is a key early clue for Parkinson's disease (PD).Danna Jennings and colleagues recently published an important study of the role of smell impairment in prodromal PD.This ........ Read more »

Jennings D, Siderowf A, Stern M, Seibyl J, Eberly S, Oakes D, Marek K, & PARS Investigators. (2014) Imaging prodromal Parkinson disease: the Parkinson Associated Risk Syndrome Study. Neurology, 83(19), 1739-46. PMID: 25298306  

  • November 12, 2015
  • 11:51 AM
  • 702 views

Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Sunset in Blanchard, OK courtesy of Dr. Tim YatesThere is a significant need for improvement in the tools available for screening for cognitive impairment in a variety of disorders in neuroscience medicine.The Mini-Mental State Examination Score (MMSE) is a widely used 30-item scale for screening dementia and other neurological conditions.However, the MMSE has some significant weaknesses for use in the clinical setting.Jin Qiao and colleagues from China recently published a study testing th........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2015
  • 11:35 AM
  • 696 views

Brain Inflammation in Dementia with Lewy Bodies

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

The role of inflammation in the brain is receiving increased attention in dementia and other disorders in neuroscience medicine.Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the third leading cause of dementia. This disorder has received increased attention with the finding of the condition in the autopsy of comedian and actor Robin Williams.Patrick Ejlerskov and colleagues from Denmark, Sweden, Germany and the United Kingdom recently published an informative study in the journal Cell on this topic.Cytokin........ Read more »

Ejlerskov P, Hultberg JG, Wang J, Carlsson R, Ambjørn M, Kuss M, Liu Y, Porcu G, Kolkova K, Friis Rundsten C.... (2015) Lack of Neuronal IFN-β-IFNAR Causes Lewy Body- and Parkinson's Disease-like Dementia. Cell, 163(2), 324-39. PMID: 26451483  

  • November 4, 2015
  • 01:50 PM
  • 803 views

Brain Imaging in Diagnosis of Lewy Body Dementia

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Brain image highlighting right insula implicated in DLBRecent information has emerged concerning the suicide death of the comedian/actor Robin Williams.Autopsy results have demonstrated that Robin Williams suffered from dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB).This public case demonstrates the difficulty in making a correct diagnosis of DLB prior to the findings at autopsy.In a previous post I reported on a screening tool for clinicians that appears to have some promise for screening for high-risk DLB pa........ Read more »

  • October 30, 2015
  • 11:06 AM
  • 993 views

Wii Fit Games for Children with Coordination Problems

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Among the types of development problems of childhood is developmental coordination disorder or DCD.In DCD, children show delay and subnormal performance in coordinated motor skills.This may be noted as a general tendency of clumsiness with difficulties in activities such as catching a ball, using scissors, handwriting or riding a bike.Computer games such as the Nintendo Wii platform provide a method to improve a variety of motor and coordination skills in a fun environment.A South African team r........ Read more »

  • October 22, 2015
  • 11:27 AM
  • 618 views

Early Birds, Night Owls and Working Memory

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

There is a growing body of research showing the individual preference for mornings or evenings influences human performance and disease.Early birds is common term for individuals who arise early and prefer activity in mornings. Night owls often stay up late at night and find they are more productive in the evenings.This day time preference pattern is known scientifically as chronotype.Christina Schmidt and colleagues from Belgium recently published an interesting study of the effect of chronotyp........ Read more »

  • October 20, 2015
  • 12:50 PM
  • 664 views

Hopelessness as Risk Factor for Alzheimer's Disease

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Original figure from Hakansson K et al. (citation below)I have been reviewing advances in neuropsychology in neuroscience medicine.One important relevant topic is the art of neuropsychological testing for the early diagnosis and monitoring of Alzheimer's and other dementias.Another important focus is finding neuropsychological risk factors for later development of cognitive impairment.Mid-life depression has been identified as a risk factor for later life cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's dis........ Read more »

  • October 15, 2015
  • 11:54 AM
  • 733 views

Tools for Alzheimer's Screening: BrainCheck

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Screening for cognitive decline and early Alzheimer's disease presents a clinical challenge for primary care providers.A variety of tests and tools are available for use but limited research has focused on testing in primary care settings.Michael Ehrensperger and colleagues recently published a study of a brief tool for screening for cognitive decline called BrainCheck.This tool combines a patient interview, an informant interview and the Clock Drawing Test administered in combination.The import........ Read more »

  • October 12, 2015
  • 11:29 AM
  • 755 views

Neuroplasticity and Training the Older Brain

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Neuroplasticity is the brain and nervous systems ability to evolve and to repair deficits.At a basic level it represents the ability to learn and develop a structural and functional system to interact with the environment.The brain's neuroplasticity is maximized during childhood and adolescence. This adaptability wanes with age. However, some neuroplasticity ability persists in the older brain.This persistence was highlighted in a study from Hong Kong recently published in the journal Neural Pla........ Read more »

Leung NT, Tam HM, Chu LW, Kwok TC, Chan F, Lam LC, Woo J, & Lee TM. (2015) Neural Plastic Effects of Cognitive Training on Aging Brain. Neural plasticity, 535618. PMID: 26417460  

  • October 8, 2015
  • 11:36 AM
  • 791 views

Brain Reward and Anabolic Steroids

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Pine Cone and Peacocks from Vatican MuseumTestosterone displays effects on brain function in both males and females.Emanuela Mhillaj and colleagues recently published a nice summary of what is currently known about the effects of anabolic-androgen steroids (AAS) on the brain.Their review highlighted the potential for AAS to modulate brain reward function and potentially lead to a drug dependence type of abuse pattern.Here are some of my notes on their discussion of AAS and the brain reward syste........ Read more »

Mhillaj E, Morgese MG, Tucci P, Bove M, Schiavone S, & Trabace L. (2015) Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function. Frontiers in neuroscience, 295. PMID: 26379484  

Yates WR, Perry PJ, & Andersen KH. (1990) Illicit anabolic steroid use: a controlled personality study. Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica, 81(6), 548-50. PMID: 2378247  

  • October 6, 2015
  • 11:22 AM
  • 808 views

Do Baseball Players Live Longer?

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

The Major League Baseball (MLB) playoffs begin today. I did a PubMed search for recent research related to baseball.One interesting abstract examined the body of research related to elite athletes and longevity.This review article examined 54 peer-reviewed manuscripts that addressed the mortality and longevity of elite athletes. Sixteen of these studies examined longevity in MLB players.I will summarize some of the conclusions from this review.MLB players tended to have longer lifespan than cont........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2015
  • 10:41 AM
  • 600 views

Academic Performance in Adolescents: Behavioral Correlates

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Galileo Bust in Galileo Museum, Florence (wryates photo)There is a significant level of interest in the best behavioral activity balance in adolescents.Adolescents currently live in an environment of expanding opportunities for spending time watching TV, surfing the internet and playing video games.Understanding the best balance of study, exercise and time in front of a screen is an important topic.Kristen Corder and colleagues recently examined adolescent behavioral activity patterns and perfor........ Read more »

  • October 1, 2015
  • 12:04 PM
  • 522 views

Does Brain Injury Increase Criminal Behavior?

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Traumatic brain injury produces a variety of cognitive effects.Some individuals will have behavioral disturbances including anger outbursts and interpersonal conflict.A recent study examined the rates of first criminal conviction in a group of 7694 men and women hospitalized with traumatic brain injury (TBI).The study found about a 50 to 75% increase in rates of post-TBI criminal convictions including violent convictions. This effect was noted using either general population controls or sibling ........ Read more »

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