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  • May 3, 2016
  • 12:00 PM
  • 401 views

"The Biggest Loser": Long-term Effects

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Yesterday I posted a link to a New York Times article that posted a summary outcome in fourteen participants in TV's "The Biggest Loser" show.The study found a trend towards post-show weight gain for 13/14 of the participants.Four participants actually gained so much weight that after six years they weighed more than before participating in the show.A key finding from the study was this weight gain could be explained by a metabolic response resulting in up to 800 calories less burned daily ........ Read more »

Fothergill, E., Guo, J., Howard, L., Kerns, J., Knuth, N., Brychta, R., Chen, K., Skarulis, M., Walter, M., Walter, P.... (2016) Persistent metabolic adaptation 6 years after “The Biggest Loser” competition. Obesity. DOI: 10.1002/oby.21538  

  • May 3, 2016
  • 11:36 AM
  • 348 views

Delirium and Aortic Valve Surgery Outcome

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Delirium is an acute confusional state that is common in elderly hospitalized patients.I think of it light a sign of acute brain failure requiring aggressive attentional for detection and treatment of any reversible underlying causes.Delirium in elderly hospitalized patients is a marker for poor outcome in a variety of medical and surgical subjects.A recent study published by a Norwegian team found effects on outcome for delirium following surgical aortic valve replacement. The key findings from........ Read more »

Eide LS, Ranhoff AH, Fridlund B, Haaverstad R, Hufthammer KO, Kuiper KK, Nordrehaug JE, Norekvål TM, & Delirium in Octogenarians Undergoing Cardiac Surgery or Intervention-CARDELIR Investigators. (2016) Delirium as a Predictor of Physical and Cognitive Function in Individuals Aged 80 and Older After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. PMID: 27106745  

  • April 23, 2016
  • 11:37 PM
  • 559 views

Long-term antibiotics for those with chronic symptoms that may or may not be related to Lyme disease

by Microbe Fan in Spirochetes Unwound

A Lyme disease study published a few weeks ago in the New England Journal of Medicine has received a lot of coverage in the press.  According to the abstract of the study, Berende and colleagues conducted a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to test the effectiveness of long-term antibiotics in treating "longer-term" symptoms "attributed" to Lyme disease.As many readers of this blog know, treatment of Lyme disease is a controversial topic.  Antibiotics are effective in treati........ Read more »

Berende A, ter Hofstede HJ, Vos FJ, van Middendorp H, Vogelaar ML, Tromp M, van den Hoogen FH, Donders AR, Evers AW, & Kullberg BJ. (2016) Randomized Trial of Longer-Term Therapy for Symptoms Attributed to Lyme Disease. The New England Journal of Medicine, 374(13), 1209-20. PMID: 27028911  

Melia MT, & Auwaerter PG. (2016) Time for a Different Approach to Lyme Disease and Long-Term Symptoms. The New England Journal of Medicine, 374(13), 1277-8. PMID: 27028918  

  • April 23, 2016
  • 12:41 PM
  • 512 views

Does E. ewingii Cause More Cases of Ehrlichiosis Than Previously Thought?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Zoonoticus

This figure shows the incidence of ehrlichicosis cases by state in 2010 per million persons. Ehrlichiosis was not notifiable in Alaska, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota or Montana. The incidence rate was zero for Arizona, Connecticut, Indiana, Massachusetts, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and Wyoming. Incidence […]... Read more »

Harris, R., Couturier, B., Sample, S., Coulter, K., Casey, K., & Schlaberg, R. (2016) Expanded Geographic Distribution and Clinical Characteristics of Infections, United States . Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 862-865. DOI: 10.3201/eid2205.152009  

  • April 12, 2016
  • 05:00 PM
  • 705 views

Dr. Kudenchuk is Misrepresenting ALPS as 'Significant'

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This study was very well done, but it was not designed to provide valid information about the effects of amiodarone or lidocaine on witnessed arrests or on EMS Witnessed arrests. Maybe the authors were overconfident.

In resuscitation research, we have abundant evidence that overconfidence is much more common than improvements in outcomes.... Read more »

Kudenchuk, P., Brown, S., Daya, M., Rea, T., Nichol, G., Morrison, L., Leroux, B., Vaillancourt, C., Wittwer, L., Callaway, C.... (2016) Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. New England Journal of Medicine. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1514204  

Glover BM, Brown SP, Morrison L, Davis D, Kudenchuk PJ, Van Ottingham L, Vaillancourt C, Cheskes S, Atkins DL, Dorian P.... (2012) Wide variability in drug use in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A report from the resuscitation outcomes consortium. Resuscitation. PMID: 22858552  

  • April 6, 2016
  • 12:02 PM
  • 595 views

World Serology Bank: Key to a Better Understanding of Infectious Disease Dynamics?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Zoonoticus

An article published in The Lancet today has highlighted the possibility of establishing a World Serology Bank to better understand the dynamics of infectious disease dynamics, especially in an era where vaccinations against infectious diseases is becoming more and more prevalent. With rapid advance in diagnostic technologies, there has been impressive progress in what used […]... Read more »

  • April 4, 2016
  • 06:15 PM
  • 665 views

Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

I wrote about the start of the ALPS (Amiodarone, Lidocaine, Placebo Study) in 2012[1] and the results are now in.
... Read more »

Kudenchuk, P., Brown, S., Daya, M., Rea, T., Nichol, G., Morrison, L., Leroux, B., Vaillancourt, C., Wittwer, L., Callaway, C.... (2016) Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. New England Journal of Medicine. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1514204  

  • March 11, 2016
  • 08:26 AM
  • 673 views

Kill "Bill" !!!

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

Drug Discovery, Part I

How does Drug Discovery start? How are targets identified? Time for Epidemiology 101... Read more »

AG McCluskey. (2016) Kill "Bill". Zongo's Cancer Diaries. info:/

  • February 12, 2016
  • 04:16 AM
  • 593 views

Maintained disomic chromosome 17 as a diagnostic marker for BHD-associated chromophobe RCC

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) can be life-threatening and although mostly sporadic, approximately 5% are associated with genetic conditions such as BHD. Early identification of families carrying cancer-predisposing mutations enables access to regular screening and earlier treatment. However, it can be difficult to distinguish between sporadic and inherited RCC based on standard immunohistological analysis. New research from Kato et al. (2016) assessed whether variability in the chromosomal status........ Read more »

  • January 24, 2016
  • 02:45 PM
  • 716 views

Treat the pain... or treat the depression? Carpal Tunnel Syndrome management

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a very common pain disorder associated with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel. Approximately 139 women and 67 males per 100,000 people will report this problem over the course of one year, although this depends on the definition used. The problem with CTS is not only that it is common, but also that it affects function - it is really difficult to carry out normal daily life with a numb or tingly hand, poor grip strength (particularly in the fingertips........ Read more »

Fernández-Muñoz, J., Palacios-Ceña, M., Cigarán-Méndez, M., Ortega-Santiago, R., de-la-Llave-Rincón, A., Salom-Moreno, J., & Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C. (2016) Pain is Associated to Clinical, Psychological, Physical, and Neurophysiological Variables in Women With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. The Clinical Journal of Pain, 32(2), 122-129. DOI: 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000241  

  • January 15, 2016
  • 09:07 AM
  • 527 views

A Weighty Problem……

by anthony.mccluskey12 in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

Amid all of the hoopla that accompanied last week’s press reports about the new Alcohol Consumption Guidelines, something else slipped under the radar.  CRUK released a statement, which didn’t receive quite the same level of media hysteria.  Which is surprising, frankly, because it involved another popular subject.  One which, if it had been released at […]... Read more »

Pérez-Hernández,A.I., Catalán, V., Gómez-Ambrosi, J., AmaiaRodríguez, A., & Frühbeck, G. (2014) Mechanisms Linking Excess Adiposity and Carcinogenesis Promotion. Frontiers in Endocrinology. DOI: 10.3389/fendo.2014.00065  

Bhimjiyani, A., Knuchel-Takano, A., & Hunt, D. (2016) Tipping the scales: Why preventing obesity makes economic sense. CRUK. info:/

  • January 15, 2016
  • 09:04 AM
  • 557 views

A Weighty Problem....

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

Obesity causes many medical conditions, such as Heart Disease, Stroke & Diabetes.
.....And cancer....?... Read more »

Pérez-Hernández,A.I., Catalán, V., Gómez-Ambrosi, J., AmaiaRodríguez, A., & Frühbeck, G. (2014) Mechanisms Linking Excess Adiposity and Carcinogenesis Promotion. Frontiers in Endocrinology. DOI: 10.3389/fendo.2014.00065  

Bhimjiyani, A., Knuchel-Takano, A., & Hunt, D. (2016) Tipping the scales: Why preventing obesity makes economic sense. CRUK. info:/

  • January 9, 2016
  • 03:36 PM
  • 799 views

Turning to the “Infected Jelly” to Treat Ebola

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The NEJM has come out with a very interesting paper: Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The explosive outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in West Africa last year had hijacked the headlines and media space in a big way. Multiple solutions were touted, including the vaccine trial STRIVE. Few articles, however, looked…... Read more »

van Griensven J, Edwards T, de Lamballerie X, Semple MG, Gallian P, Baize S, Horby PW, Raoul H, Magassouba N, Antierens A.... (2016) Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The New England journal of medicine, 374(1), 33-42. PMID: 26735992  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 01:28 PM
  • 1,134 views

If Colistin Goes, Can Carbapenems be Far Behind?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

I wrote about the disaster-in-the-making discovery of transmissible resistance to colistin, a last resort antibiotic, when the Lancet Infectious Diseases published a paper based on data coming out from surveillance in China. At that point of time, the isolation of the transmissible gene providing resistance (mcr1 gene) gained a lot of attention. Maryn McKenna’s blog post went…... Read more »

  • January 5, 2016
  • 11:37 AM
  • 737 views

Stroke Risk Following Mental Disorders

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

An important recent manuscript published in JAMA Psychiatry looked at medical illnesses rates following diagnosis of a brain (mental) disorder.This very large international study examined over 47,000 subjects followed between 2001 and 2011.Baseline psychiatric assessment was completed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Physical illness was assessed using a self-report of physician's diagnosis.The manuscript is not free but I was able to obtain a professional courtesy copy of........ Read more »

  • January 4, 2016
  • 01:59 PM
  • 578 views

Meta-Research: Getting the Most Out of Research

by Roli Roberts in PLOS Biologue

Scientific research, often portrayed as the acme of human rigorous thought, is actually an activity that’s grown rather organically over the centuries from Aristotle, via Bacon, to an endeavour that now involves millions of people... Read more »

  • December 29, 2015
  • 04:30 PM
  • 936 views

This Month in Blastocystis Research (DEC 2015)

by Christen Rune Stensvold in Blastocystis Parasite Blog

Practically all Blastocystis research has focussed on identifying a role for the parasite in disease. Meanwhile, no one has really tried to looked into what Blastocystis may tell us about human health. Together with partner labs, our lab has produced data suggesting that Blastocystis carriage is extremely common, and probably also extremely long lasting. We have also shown that the parasite is associated with certain gut microbial communities and that it is more common in healthy individuals tha........ Read more »

  • December 23, 2015
  • 10:27 AM
  • 504 views

Paid Sick Leave May Help Cancer Patient Retain Jobs

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Christine Veenstra MD Clinical Lecturer, Internal Medicine Medical Oncology University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI  48109-5343 MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Veenstra: Patients with cancer face many costs … Continue reading →
The post Paid Sick Leave May Help Cancer Patient Retain Jobs appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Christine Veenstra MD. (2015) Paid Sick Leave May Help Cancer Patient Retain Jobs. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • December 11, 2015
  • 12:41 AM
  • 1,391 views

The Apocalypse is HERE: Transmissible Resistance to Last Resort Antibiotic (Colistin)

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Polymyxins are a group of bacterial origin cyclic polypeptides with antibacterial properties. It was isolated by a Japanese researcher in 1949 from a jar of fermenting bacteria. Colistin, also known as Polymyxin E, which is produced by the bacteria Paenibacillus polymyxa var. colistinus, is a polypeptide antibiotic, which is effective against almost all gram-negative bacilli. Owing to its nephrotoxocity and…... Read more »

  • December 8, 2015
  • 01:50 PM
  • 660 views

Why is progress so slow in resuscitation research?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

Why is progress so slow in resuscitation research? A lot of money and time went in to finding out which type of blood-letting ventilation works best – ignoring the absence of valid evidence that ventilation is better than no ventilation. Why not gamble with our patients?

In response to The Fatal Flaw in Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR,[1],[2] Kenny commented that –

there are many things in your blog that are not correct.[1]... Read more »

Nichol, G., Leroux, B., Wang, H., Callaway, C., Sopko, G., Weisfeldt, M., Stiell, I., Morrison, L., Aufderheide, T., Cheskes, S.... (2015) Trial of Continuous or Interrupted Chest Compressions during CPR. New England Journal of Medicine, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509139  

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