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  • December 6, 2016
  • 08:46 AM
  • 397 views

Are American Professors More Responsive to Requests Made by White Male Students?

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

The vast majority of professors will gladly meet a prospective graduate student and discuss research opportunities as well as long-term career options, especially if the student requesting the meeting clarifies the goal of the meeting. However, there are cases when students wait in vain for a response. Is it because their email never reached the professor because it got lost in the internet ether or a spam folder? Was the professor simply too busy to respond? A research study headed by Katherine........ Read more »

  • August 12, 2016
  • 06:52 AM
  • 626 views

Discovering a glaring error in a research paper – a personal account

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

New York Magazine has published a great article about how grad student Steven Ludeke tried to correct mistakes in the research of Pete Hatemi and Brad Verhulst. Overall, Ludeke summarises his experience as ‘not recommendable’. Back in my undergraduate years I spotted an error in an article by David DeMatteo and did little to correct it. […]... Read more »

  • May 16, 2016
  • 08:43 AM
  • 585 views

Academic publication quality and the senility of science

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

A recent column in Nature by Daniel Sarewitz laments the ever increasing torrent of academic publications. Quantity goes up, but quality does not follow suit. There are more scientists than ever. And they publish more than ever. However, that doesn’t mean they publish more high quality research. This harks back to the work of Derek J. […]... Read more »

Kidwell MC, Lazarević LB, Baranski E, Hardwicke TE, Piechowski S, Falkenberg LS, Kennett C, Slowik A, Sonnleitner C, Hess-Holden C.... (2016) Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices: A Simple, Low-Cost, Effective Method for Increasing Transparency. PLoS biology, 14(5). PMID: 27171007  

  • May 10, 2016
  • 03:47 AM
  • 643 views

Getting Published (the story behind the paper)

by Christophe Dessimoz in Open Reading Frame

Our paper “A Pragmatic Approach to Getting Published: 35 Tips for Early Career Researchers” just came out in Frontiers in Plant Science. This is the story behind the paper.

For my second postdoc, I was the fortunate receipient of a PLANT FELLOWS scholarship. PLANT FELLOWS is an international program that provides research grants to postdocs in the field of plant science. The fellows are based at many different host institutions throughout Europe. I myself am working at Bayer Crop Science ........ Read more »

Glover, N., Antoniadi, I., George, G., Götzenberger, L., Gutzat, R., Koorem, K., Liancourt, P., Rutowicz, K., Saharan, K., You, W.... (2016) A Pragmatic Approach to Getting Published: 35 Tips for Early Career Researchers. Frontiers in Plant Science. DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2016.00610  

  • December 31, 2015
  • 03:10 AM
  • 899 views

ASCB15 – part 2

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

I ended Part 1 after the morning session on pushing the boundaries of imaging. After the amazing talks on imaging, I browsed the halls, visited some exhibitors, sampled a couple of exhibitor tech-talks. I later went to a mycrosymposium (#2: signaling … Continue reading →... Read more »

Smith C, Lari A, Derrer CP, Ouwehand A, Rossouw A, Huisman M, Dange T, Hopman M, Joseph A, Zenklusen D.... (2015) In vivo single-particle imaging of nuclear mRNA export in budding yeast demonstrates an essential role for Mex67p. The Journal of cell biology, 211(6), 1121-30. PMID: 26694837  

Nelles DA, Fang MY, Aigner S, & Yeo GW. (2015) Applications of Cas9 as an RNA-programmed RNA-binding protein. BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology, 37(7), 732-9. PMID: 25880497  

Vale RD. (2015) Accelerating scientific publication in biology. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(44), 13439-46. PMID: 26508643  

  • December 8, 2015
  • 12:46 PM
  • 1,305 views

The Dire State of Science in the Muslim World

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Universities and the scientific infrastructures in Muslim-majority countries need to undergo radical reforms if they want to avoid falling by the wayside in a world characterized by major scientific and technological innovations. This is the conclusion reached by Nidhal Guessoum and Athar Osama in their recent commentary "Institutions: Revive universities of the Muslim world", published in the scientific journal Nature. The physics and astronomy professor Guessoum (American University ........ Read more »

  • March 17, 2015
  • 08:31 AM
  • 1,327 views

Gender equality in science: it takes a village

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Late last year, a metastudy was published showing that, since 2000, things are improving for women working in most STEM-based fields, although there are some notable exceptions... Read more »

  • March 11, 2015
  • 10:14 AM
  • 1,249 views

Citizen science is making scientists of everyone

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Citizen science is getting a lot of attention these days, which might make you think it is a new social phenomenon. But in fact, nothing is further from the truth.... Read more »

Blackawton P. S., Airzee S. , Allen A., Baker S., Berrow A., Blair C., Churchill M., Coles J., Cumming R. F.-J., & Fraquelli L. (2011) Blackawton bees. Biology Letters, 168-172. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.1056  

Silvertown Jonathan. (2009) A new dawn for citizen science. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 24(9), 467-471. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2009.03.017  

  • March 8, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,020 views

Gender inequality in science varies among disciplines

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Certain disciplines have a lower percentage of women than others. A study published in Science puts forward the hypothesis that there are proportionately fewer women in fields where it is believed that brilliance and innate talent are required rather than hard work and dedication. The study, which looked at 1,820 researchers in institutions of higher education in the United States, showed an inverse relationship between the fields that value innate talent and the number of women represented in t........ Read more »

  • November 2, 2014
  • 06:08 PM
  • 761 views

...How to Fix Science

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

(Part 2/2) However, we can fix science. [Infographic]... Read more »

Alberts, B., Kirschner, M., Tilghman, S., & Varmus, H. (2014) Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(16), 5773-5777. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404402111  

  • November 2, 2014
  • 06:32 AM
  • 843 views

Research is Broken...

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

(Part 1/2) The system of funding research is broken... [Infographic]... Read more »

Alberts, B., Kirschner, M., Tilghman, S., & Varmus, H. (2014) Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(16), 5773-5777. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404402111  

  • March 28, 2014
  • 09:57 AM
  • 1,480 views

Patching the Leaky Pipeline of Women in STEM

by amikulak in Daily Observations

March is designated Women’s History Month in the United States, recognizing “generations of women whose commitment to nature and the planet have proved invaluable to society.” And yet, as we […]... Read more »

  • September 10, 2013
  • 04:39 AM
  • 1,061 views

The cost of the rejection-resubmission cycle

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

Rejection is one of the unpleasant but inevitable components of life. There are positive components to rejection: they build character, they force you to deal with negativity and sometimes they force you to change your life to avoid future rejections. […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...... Read more »

  • June 26, 2013
  • 08:42 AM
  • 1,138 views

Do blog posts correlate with a higher number of future citations?

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Do blog posts correlate with a higher number of future citations? In many cases, yes, at least for Researchblogging.org (RB). Judit Bar-Ilan, Mike Thelwall and I already used RB, a science blogging aggregator for posts citing peer-reviewed research, in our previous article. RB has many advantages (if you read the previous article’s post, you can [...]... Read more »

  • June 6, 2013
  • 04:24 AM
  • 1,044 views

More Money makes you Bad at Work: The Myth of Performance-Related Pay.

by Stuart Farrimond in Dr Stu's Science Blog

Motivated by money? I confess I am. Well ok, not always: there are plenty of things that will trump a stack of greenbacks. However, few of us would object to a kindly benefactor plopping a million quid into our current account. Even for the least materially-minded, it would be difficult to ignore such an offer: … Continue reading »... Read more »

ARIELY, D., GNEEZY, U., LOEWENSTEIN, G., & MAZAR, N. (2009) Large Stakes and Big Mistakes. Review of Economic Studies, 76(2), 451-469. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-937X.2009.00534.x  

  • January 8, 2013
  • 11:37 AM
  • 2,522 views

The USA Dream for IMGs: Coming to an end? Analysing the 2012 Match

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

My attention was drawn to an article in the JAMA today (1) by one of my friends who is actively pursuing the USMLE route. And after reading this, I guess I have to admit that one now has to make haste in order to prevent waste. Now I have long been wanting to write about [...]... Read more »

Traverso G, & McMahon GT. (2012) Residency training and international medical graduates: coming to America no more. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 308(21), 2193-4. PMID: 23212494  

  • January 1, 2013
  • 05:28 AM
  • 1,244 views

What’s wrong with citation analysis?

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

What’s wrong with citation analysis? Other than your papers not being cited enough, what’s wrong with measuring scientific influence based on citation count? Citation analysis-based decisions concerning grants, promotions, etc. have become popular because, among other things, they’re considered “unbiased.” After all, such analysis gives numbers even non-professionals can understand, helping them make the best [...]









... Read more »

MacRoberts, M., & MacRoberts, B. (1996) Problems of citation analysis. Scientometrics, 36(3), 435-444. DOI: 10.1007/BF02129604  

MacRoberts, M., & MacRoberts, B. (2010) Problems of citation analysis: A study of uncited and seldom-cited influences. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 61(1), 1-12. DOI: 10.1002/asi.21228  

Priem, J., Taraborelli, D., Groth, P., & Neylon, C. (2010) altmetrics: a manifesto. http://altmetrics.org/manifesto/. info:/

  • December 18, 2012
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,075 views

How Long Should a Scientific Publication be?

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

In one word: short. In two words: it depends. A neuroscience expert faces the challenge of 100 new neuroscience articles being published on a daily basis. S/he will never be able to read all that. So, what can be done to get your own publication known to the community? . 1) Know the reader and [...]... Read more »

  • September 26, 2012
  • 08:55 AM
  • 943 views

Interview confidence

by David Winter in Careers - in Theory

A couple of months back someone asked a very interesting question on Careers Debate about how one expresses and demonstrates confidence in one’s area of expertise at an interview whilst avoiding self-aggrandisement. Is it just a question of body language and non-verbal communication, or are there other clues that you can give in the way that [...]... Read more »

  • September 22, 2012
  • 05:00 PM
  • 1,210 views

The power to see the future is exciting and terrifying

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

In a recent comment in Nature, Daniel Acuna, Stefano Allesina, and Konrad Kording describe a statistical model for predicting h-index. In case you are not familiar with it, h-index is a citation-based measure of scientific impact. An h-index of n means that you have n publications with at least n citations. I only learned about h-index relatively recently and I think it is a quite elegant measure -- simple to compute, not too biased by a single highly-cited paper or by many low-im........ Read more »

Acuna, D.E., Allesina, Stefano, & Kording, Konrad P. (2012) Predicting scientific success. Nature, 489(7415), 201-202. DOI: 10.1038/489201a  

Liu, Shi V. (2006) Top Journals’ Top Retraction Rates. Scientific Ethics, 1(2), 91-93. info:/

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