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All posts; Tags Include "Behavioral Neuroscience"

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  • March 7, 2013
  • 11:04 PM
  • 642 views

Bmal1 Control of Metabolism, Cont'd

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Further evidence that Bmal1 regulates metabolism in a not so good manner.... Read more »

Shi, S., Ansari, T., McGuinness, O., Wasserman, D., & Johnson, C. (2013) Circadian Disruption Leads to Insulin Resistance and Obesity. Current Biology, 23(5), 372-381. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.01.048  

  • February 27, 2013
  • 12:48 AM
  • 726 views

FOXP2, all sexed up.

by Shelly Fan in Neurorexia

FOXP2 is the poster child of a sexy gene. In songbirds, decreasing FOXP2 renders a bird incapable of mimicking their tutor, resulting in more variable song. In humans, mutations in the gene is linked to a multitude of language and speech impairments, such as stuttering and trouble with enunciating sounds, syllables and words. There’s no [...]... Read more »

Bowers JM, Perez-Pouchoulen M, Edwards NS, & McCarthy MM. (2013) Foxp2 mediates sex differences in ultrasonic vocalization by rat pups and directs order of maternal retrieval. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 33(8), 3276-83. PMID: 23426656  

  • February 25, 2013
  • 10:50 PM
  • 1,285 views

The Neurotransmitter Dopamine May Be A Key Mediator Of The “Superiority Illusion”

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

The concept “superiority illusion” refers to the fact that people tend to judge themselves as being superior to the average person when it comes to positive traits such as intelligence, desirability or other personality traits. This is mathematically not possible, because in a normally distributed population, most people cannot be above average. The “superiority illusion” belongs to a family of positive illusions, such as the “optimism bias”, which is characte........ Read more »

Yamada, M., Uddin, L., Takahashi, H., Kimura, Y., Takahata, K., Kousa, R., Ikoma, Y., Eguchi, Y., Takano, H., Ito, H.... (2013) Superiority illusion arises from resting-state brain networks modulated by dopamine. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1221681110  

  • February 24, 2013
  • 01:00 PM
  • 1,511 views

Scientizing Art

by TheCellularScale in The Cellular Scale

I've always been fascinated with the way the eye moves around a piece of art. Andrew Wyeth's "Christina's World" (or as I looked up "that painting of a girl in a field looking at a house")This piece by Andrew Wyeth is an obvious example of an artist completely controlling your gaze. There are pretty much no options here. You look at the girl and then you follow her gaze to the house. You probably then take a quick glance at that other house/barn to the left, and then maybe follow the edge of the........ Read more »

Massaro D, Savazzi F, Di Dio C, Freedberg D, Gallese V, Gilli G, & Marchetti A. (2012) When art moves the eyes: a behavioral and eye-tracking study. PloS one, 7(5). PMID: 22624007  

  • February 23, 2013
  • 09:43 AM
  • 642 views

Short Sleepers Crave Paleo or Paleo Causes Short Sleep?

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researches have found a link between type of diet vs sleep duration, begging the question of whether amount of sleep predisposes people to eat a certain way or does eating a certain way cause people to sleep a certain amount. In this post, I relate it to my own special diet (paleo) which appears to be associated with short sleep durations, of which does not describe me. Nevertheless, this could be a fruitful (not pun intended) area of research.... Read more »

  • February 19, 2013
  • 07:12 PM
  • 752 views

Genetic and Tissue-Specific Regulation of Obesity

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers utilized many experimental techniques to determine genetic and tissue regulation of pathological feeding at a systems level, which could be partially rescued by a change in diet!!... Read more »

Paschos GK, Ibrahim S, Song WL, Kunieda T, Grant G, Reyes TM, Bradfield CA, Vaughan CH, Eiden M, Masoodi M.... (2012) Obesity in mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of clock component Arntl. Nature medicine, 18(12), 1768-77. PMID: 23142819  

  • February 13, 2013
  • 05:00 PM
  • 601 views

A Singing Mouse?

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers have discovered a complex hierarchy of vocalizations in mice that are often use to establish social dominance and obviously apparent during the pursuit of mates ... Read more »

  • February 13, 2013
  • 02:45 PM
  • 1,139 views

Terminator Vision: I Can Haz It?

by Neural Outlaw in Neural Interface

You've all seen The Terminator film and it's sequels and, admit it, you loved them. Not just because of the creepily futurealistic storyline but because of the stunts, the camerawork, the casting, and the sheer action of it all. And, of course, the special effects. As an example of the best sci-fi films out there, the Terminator films franchise has grossed nearly $1.5 billion worldwide.Some of the iconic scenes in the movies related directly to the Terminator itself, that ice-cold star........ Read more »

  • February 13, 2013
  • 02:38 PM
  • 1,188 views

Terminator Vision: I Can Haz It?

by Neural Outlaw in Neural Interface


You've all seen The Terminator film and it's sequels and, admit it, you loved them. Not just because of the creepily futurealistic storyline but because of the stunts, the camerawork, the casting, and the sheer action of it all. And, of course, the special effects. As an example of the best sci-fi films out there, the Terminator films franchise has grossed nearly $1.5 billion worldwide.Some of the iconic scenes in the movies related directly to the Terminator itself, that ice-cold stare as a mi........ Read more »

  • February 11, 2013
  • 05:37 PM
  • 785 views

Neural Control of Snacking (in a Rat!!)

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers investigated the neurobiology of snacking in a rat. This experimental aim is no surprise, but the approach is; they used potato chips!!!... Read more »

  • February 10, 2013
  • 04:35 PM
  • 1,072 views

Why scientists should play games

by TheCellularScale in The Cellular Scale

I have just finished reading Jane McGonigal's book Reality is Broken: Why games make us better and how they can change the world. It is a fascinating book which presents a strong case for games (including video games) doing good in the world.Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigalI have to admit, part of me wanted to read this book to make me feel better about my own video game habit. It certainly helped solidify the vague ideas I had about what good they might be doing me.Specifically, the book mad........ Read more »

  • February 6, 2013
  • 07:09 PM
  • 1,617 views

JoVE: god of thunder, journal of techniques

by TheCellularScale in The Cellular Scale

If you don't know about the Journal of Visualized Experiments, now is the time to learn.god of thunder, journal of techniques (source)Methods sections of papers should contain enough detail that a scientist reading it could replicate the results of the paper. But this is rarely the case. Research in computational neuroscience has an advantage because the actual code used to run the simulations can be deposited and downloaded. But for experimental work, the nuances of exactly how to do each ........ Read more »

  • February 1, 2013
  • 05:00 PM
  • 703 views

Aging, Poor Sleep, and Bad Memory

by Allison in Dormivigilia

A friend of mine has studied the functional relationships between brain anatomy, sleep/wake architecture, and performance on a memory-related task. I wonder how this relationship would hold in individuals with a predisposition to Alzheimer's or chronic traumatic encephalitis... Read more »

  • February 1, 2013
  • 11:44 AM
  • 1,113 views

Oxytocin and Human Attachment

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

In a previous post, I summarized a recent review on the neuroscience of human attachment. This review highlighted research related to the human bonding and social interactions.  Attachment ability shows significant variability in humans with insecure attachment styles contributing to risk for some mental disorders.     The neuroanatomical framework for social processing is being investigated with brain imaging techniques.Hormonal factors including the role of oxytoc........ Read more »

  • January 31, 2013
  • 12:47 PM
  • 861 views

Neuroscience of Human Attachment

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Attachment is the ability to form human relationship bonds.  Individuals vary in their ability to develop social relationships.  The ability to form secure human relationships plays a key role in successful personal and occupational development.Attachment theory evolved over 50 years ago.  This theory proposes all humans have an innate biological mechanism that supports social engagement.  This engagement is necessary during infancy to encourage nurturance and provision of a ........ Read more »

  • January 25, 2013
  • 07:20 AM
  • 1,099 views

Are we incentivizing hype in science? A case study

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

There is a lively discussion going on right now in various forums on the incentives for scientists to publish their work in this venue or another. Some of these discussions cite our manuscript on the pernicious consequences of journal rank, others don't. In our manuscript, we speculate that the scientific community may be facing a deluge of fraud and misconduct, because of the incentives to publish in high-ranking journals, a central point of contention in the discussions lnked to above. An exam........ Read more »

Wasserman, S., Salomon, A., & Frye, M. (2013) Drosophila Tracks Carbon Dioxide in Flight. Current Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2012.12.038  

  • January 24, 2013
  • 05:22 PM
  • 596 views

A Neurobiological Secret to PR-ing in the Gym

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers found time-of-day improvements in athletes squatting and benching. The time-of-day handicap (for morning athletes) was rescued by consumption of a pre-workout shake. ... Read more »

  • January 23, 2013
  • 07:00 PM
  • 493 views

Adenosine, Sleep, and Seasons

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers further investigated changes in central adenosine release dependent on sleep history. Beyond previous studies, they also found other neuromodulators, particularly excitatory neurotransmitters, that enhance adenosine tone. ... Read more »

Robert Edward Sims*, Houdini Ho Tin Wu, Nicholas Dale. (2013) Sleep-Wake Sensitive Mechanisms of Adenosine Release in the Basal Forebrain of Rodents: An In Vitro Study. PLoS One. info:/

  • January 19, 2013
  • 01:27 PM
  • 1,105 views

LMAYQ: Why do I like that?

by TheCellularScale in The Cellular Scale

Again it is time for me to answer some questions. As always, these are real true 'search terms' that have resulted in some one finding The Cellular Scale. While some questions (like 'how do you build a model of a neuron') are answered by this blog, the ones I answer is these LMAYQ posts are almost certainly not. All the questions and answers in this series can be found in the Let Me Answer Your Questions index.Drawing by Grave Unicorn1. "Why do I like ketamine so much?"This is actually a pretty ........ Read more »

  • January 14, 2013
  • 11:47 PM
  • 1,375 views

Dopamine and Anorexia Nervosa: Tackling the Myths – Part IV (Treatment with Antipsychotics)

by Tetyana in Science of Eating Disorders

This is part IV in my mini-series on the role of dopamine in anorexia nervosa. In part I, I did a a little introduction on dopamine and dopamine signalling in the brain. In part II, I discussed preclinical studies using animal models to study the role of dopamine in AN. Finally, in part III, I talked about clinical studies using patients with AN to assess dopamine function. In this final post, I’ll review the evidence for using drugs that modulate the dopamine system in order to treat anor........ Read more »

Kontis, D., & Theochari, E. (2012) Dopamine in anorexia nervosa. Behavioural Pharmacology, 23(5 and 6), 496-515. DOI: 10.1097/FBP.0b013e328357e115  

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