Post List

Medicine posts

(Modify Search »)

  • March 19, 2015
  • 08:22 PM
  • 102 views

Rate At Which Genetic Code Read May Offer New Drug Targets

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jeff Coller, PhD  Associate professor Division of General Medical Science Associate director, The Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine MedicalResearch: What is the background of this study? Dr. Coller: There are a … Continue reading →
The post Rate At Which Genetic Code Read May Offer New Drug Targets appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Jeff Coller, PhD Associate professor. (2015) Rate At Which Genetic Code Read May Offer New Drug Targets. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 19, 2015
  • 03:50 PM
  • 82 views

Melanoma: Targeting Macrophages Increases BRAF Inhibitors’ Effectiveness

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Russel E. Kaufman, MD President Emeritus Professor, Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis Program The Wistar Institute Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Targeted therapies … Continue reading →
The post Melanoma: Targeting Macrophages Increases BRAF Inhibitors’ Effectiveness appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Russel E. Kaufman, MD. (2015) Melanoma: Targeting Macrophages Increases BRAF Inhibitors' Effectiveness. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 19, 2015
  • 03:24 PM
  • 80 views

Abnormal Nocturnal Blood Pressure In Young Adults May Lead To Later Cognitive Impairments

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Yuichiro Yano MD Dept of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Previous research has suggested that nocturnal blood pressure (blood pressure during … Continue reading →
The post Abnormal Nocturnal Blood Pressure In Young Adults May Lead To Later Cognitive Impairments appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Yuichiro Yano MD. (2015) Abnormal Nocturnal Blood Pressure In Young Adults May Lead To Later Cognitive Impairments. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 19, 2015
  • 03:08 PM
  • 82 views

Young Children May Acquire A Taste For Salt From Common Foods In Infancy

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Joyce Maalouf MS MPH Nutrition Epidemiologist CDC, Atlanta Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Although significant research shows U.S. children are eating too much sodium, data on the top … Continue reading →
The post Young Children May Acquire A Taste For Salt From Common Foods In Infancy appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Joyce Maalouf MS MPH. (2015) Young Children May Acquire A Taste For Salt From Common Foods In Infancy. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 19, 2015
  • 02:46 PM
  • 60 views

Toxins In Vapor From Electronic Cigarettes Can Travel Far

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jonathan Thornburg, PhD Director, Exposure and Aerosol Technology RTI International Research Triangle Park, NC MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Thornburg: RTI wants to improve the human condition by … Continue reading →
The post Toxins In Vapor From Electronic Cigarettes Can Travel Far appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Jonathan Thornburg, PhD, & Director, Exposure and Aerosol Technology. (2015) Toxins In Vapor From Electronic Cigarettes Can Travel Far. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 19, 2015
  • 02:25 PM
  • 64 views

Healthy Diet and Physical Activity Vital For Cardiovascular Health of Kids

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
  MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Donald M Lloyd-Jones, MD/ScM Senior Associate Dean for Clinical and Translational Research, Chair, Department of Preventive Medicine Director, Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (NUCATS) Eileen M. Foell Professor Professor in Preventive Medicine-Epidemiology and Medicine-Cardiology … Continue reading →
The post Healthy Diet and Physical Activity Vital For Cardiovascular Health of Kids appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Donald M Lloyd-Jones, MD/ScM. (2015) Healthy Diet and Physical Activity Vital For Cardiovascular Health of Kids. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 19, 2015
  • 07:30 AM
  • 56 views

Auditory Hallucinations Surprisingly Varied, Complex and Physical

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Angela Woods Associate Editor, BMJ Medical Humanities Journal Senior Lecturer in Medical Humanities Deputy Director, Centre for Medical Humanities Durham University   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Woods: … Continue reading →
The post Auditory Hallucinations Surprisingly Varied, Complex and Physical appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr Angela Woods. (2015) Auditory Hallucinations Surprising Varied, Complex and Physical. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 19, 2015
  • 06:54 AM
  • 66 views

German Study Suggests CT Screening For Lung Cancer Has Unresolved Questions

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Dr. Nikolaus Becker Epidemiologisches Krebsregister Baden-Württemberg Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg Germany Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Prof. Becker: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in … Continue reading →
The post German Study Suggests CT Screening For Lung Cancer Has Unresolved Questions appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Prof. Dr. Nikolaus Becker. (2015) German Study Suggests CT Screening For Lung Cancer Has Unresolved Questions. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 19, 2015
  • 06:05 AM
  • 99 views

Objective measures of sleep in autism meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] have small but measurable objective differences in their sleep parameters that are consistent with subjective reporting."That was the main conclusion reached in the meta-analysis from Marilisa Elrod and Bradley Hood [1] who looked at the collected peer-reviewed data "that used objective measures such as actigraphy or polysomnography (PSG) to describe the sleep parameters of TST [total sleep time], SL [sleep latency], and SE [sleep efficiency] in children with ASD compared with children with TD [typical development]."Just in case you didn't want to click on the links to some of those explanations, actigraphy is all about measuring movements and so useful in analysing the 'rest/activity' cycle; PSG is a slightly move comprehensive way of measuring various biophysical parameters during sleep; sleep latency is basically the amount of time it takes for a person to fall asleep, and sleep efficiency refers to how much sleep a person gets from time of lying down to getting up from bed (usually expressed as a percentage).Ten studies met the authors' inclusion criteria covering nearly 350 children diagnosed with an ASD and 221 asymptomatic controls. Researchers reported that children with autism spent on average half an hour less per day TST (total sleep time) and took about 10 minutes longer to fall asleep than controls. Sleep efficiency was also marginally reduced for the autism group. As one might have expected, there was some "notable heterogeneity" across the various study results. That and the fact that comorbidity (if I can still call it that) such as intellectual (learning) disability also seemed to play some hand in the results obtained: "those with ASD and intellectual disability (ID) had a significant decrease in TST as compared with TD peers."There are a few points to make about this research. First is the continuing idea that 'subjective reporting' when it comes to autism is actually not a bad indicator of what might be going on or have been going on. We've seen evidence of this quite a few times now in the peer-reviewed literature: maternal recall vs. medical records (see here), the reported presence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (see here), first concerns about autism (see here) and now possibly with sleep in mind. Obviously this doesn't mean that every single person questioned about a topic area of autism is going to be providing an authoritative history allowing research to 'do away' with more objective measures. But it does mean that parent or caregiver report might be a very good place to start.Next, allowing for the text "small but measurable", Elrod & Hood further add to the quite voluminous literature indicating that sleep issues can be a real point of contention for quite a few people on the autism spectrum. I've talked about sleep a few times on this blog (see here and see here) including the idea that melatonin might be a medication of consideration for some [2]. More recently I've also discussed the idea that other factors might play some role in sleep issues in cases of autism as per some research on pain predicting sleeping problems (see here) and/or behavioural sleep intervention being indicated (see here) (particularly when certain comorbidity might be present). Whatever the reasons/intervention suggested, sleep or rather a lack of sleep (quality sleep), is probably not a great thing for anyone.And with that, some music and a song about a sidewinder sleeping...----------[1] Elrod MG. & Hood BS. Sleep Differences Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders and Typically Developing Peers: A Meta-Analysis. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2015 Feb 18.[2] Rossignol DA. & Frye RE. Melatonin in autism spectrum disorders. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2014;9(4):326-34.----------Elrod, M., & Hood, B. (2015). Sleep Differences Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders and Typically Developing Peers Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics DOI: 10.1097/DBP.0000000000000140... Read more »

  • March 18, 2015
  • 06:28 PM
  • 53 views

Women With Low Vitamin D More Likely To Report Depression

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: David C.R. Kerr Ph.D. Sch of Psychological Science Associate Professor College of Liberal Arts Oregon State University Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Kerr: Many people assume we … Continue reading →
The post Women With Low Vitamin D More Likely To Report Depression appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & David C.R. Kerr Ph.D. (2015) Women With Low Vitamin D More Likely To Report Depression . MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 18, 2015
  • 05:14 PM
  • 53 views

Large Study Evaluates Predictors of Long Term PCI Outcomes

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Ran Kornowski, M.D, FACC, FESC Chairman – Division of Cardiology, Rabin Medical Center Petah-Tikva, Israel MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? Prof. Kornowski: Over the years, the PCI procedure went-through many progresses. Among those … Continue reading →
The post Large Study Evaluates Predictors of Long Term PCI Outcomes appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Prof. Ran Kornowski, M.D, FACC, FESC. (2015) Large Study Evaluates Predictors of Long Term PCI Outcomes. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 18, 2015
  • 04:41 PM
  • 61 views

Sustained Weight Loss Improves Arial Fibrillation Control

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Rajeev Kumar Pathak MBBS, FRACP Cardiologist and Electrophysiology Fellow Centre for Heart Rhythm Disorders | University of Adelaide Cardiovascular Investigation Unit | Royal Adelaide Hospital Adelaide Australia Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the … Continue reading →
The post Sustained Weight Loss Improves Arial Fibrillation Control appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr Rajeev Kumar Pathak MBBS, FRACP. (2015) Sustained Weight Loss Improves Arial Fibrillation Control. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 18, 2015
  • 04:23 PM
  • 42 views

Antipsychotic Medications Linked To Higher Mortality In Dementia Patients

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Donovan Maust, MD, MS Assistant Professor of Psychiatry University of Michigan Research Scientist, Center for Clinical Management Research VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? … Continue reading →
The post Antipsychotic Medications Linked To Higher Mortality In Dementia Patients appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Donovan Maust, MD, MS. (2015) Antipsychotic Medications Linked To Higher Mortality In Dementia Patients. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 18, 2015
  • 03:59 PM
  • 53 views

Successful Long Term Weight Loss May Hinge On Increasing Exercise, Decreasing Alcohol

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sirpa Soini, MHC, researcher Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care University of Helsinki Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Response: Short-term weight loss is often successful, but he obtained results are difficult … Continue reading →
The post Successful Long Term Weight Loss May Hinge On Increasing Exercise, Decreasing Alcohol appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Sirpa Soini, MHC, researcher. (2015) Successful Long Term Weight Loss May Hinge On Increasing Exercise, Decreasing Alcohol. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 18, 2015
  • 02:19 PM
  • 128 views

Not “just in your head,” brain networks differ among those with severe schizophrenia

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The brain is plastic, it’s how we grow, it’s how we adapt, it is quite literally how we survive. This can unfortunately be to our detriment and new research shows that people with a severe form of schizophrenia have major differences in their brain networks compared to others with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and healthy individuals. So while it may be true, that it is all be in your head, it isn’t how people usually mean it.... Read more »

Anne L. Wheeler, PhD, Michèle Wessa, PhD, Philip R. Szeszko, PhD, George Foussias, MD, MSc, M. Mallar Chakravarty, PhD, Jason P. Lerch, PhD, Pamela DeRosse, PhD, Gary Remington, MD, PhD, Benoit H. Mulsant, MD, Julia Linke, PhD.... (2015) Further Neuroimaging Evidence for the Deficit Subtype of Schizophrenia: A Cortical Connectomics Analysis. JAMA Psychiatry. info:/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.3020

  • March 18, 2015
  • 12:36 PM
  • 47 views

Clinicians’ Race and Social Biases Did Not Affect Patient Clinical Care

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Adil Haider, MD, MPH Kessler Director of the Center for Surgery and Public Health (CSPH) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Response: Disparities in the quality of care … Continue reading →
The post Clinicians’ Race and Social Biases Did Not Affect Patient Clinical Care appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Adil Haider, MD, MPH. (2015) Clinicians' Race and Social Bias Did Not Affect Patient Clinical Care. MedicalResearch.com. info:/http://medicalresearch.com/author-interviews/clinicians-rac…-clinical-care/12716

  • March 18, 2015
  • 11:00 AM
  • 42 views

Understanding Leader Cells In Cell Migration

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Pak Kin Wong Ph.D. Aerospace& Mechanical Engineering Department Biomedical Engineering and Bio5 Institute The University of Arizona Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Collective cell migration is … Continue reading →
The post Understanding Leader Cells In Cell Migration appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Pak Kin Wong Ph.D. (2015) Understanding Leader Cells In Cell Migration. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 18, 2015
  • 09:36 AM
  • 120 views

Video Tip of the Week: Designing proteins, using Rosetta

by Mary in OpenHelix

As often happens, last week’s tip on visualizing structures led me to some more reading and thinking about creating protein structures. And although it’s important for biologists to be able to use more of the information about protein structures and variations in their work from tools like Aquaria or PDB, it’s also important for some […]... Read more »

Kuroda D., M. P. Jacobson, & H. Nakamura. (2012) Computer-aided antibody design. Protein Engineering Design and Selection, 25(10), 507-522. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/protein/gzs024  

  • March 18, 2015
  • 07:04 AM
  • 53 views

Pathologists Don’t Always Agree On Breast Biopsy Atypia or DCIS

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Joann G. Elmore M.D., M.P.H. Professor of Medicine, Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology, University of Washington School of Medicine Harborview Medical Center Seattle, WA 98104-2499 MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? … Continue reading →
The post Pathologists Don’t Always Agree On Breast Biopsy Atypia or DCIS appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Joann G. Elmore M.D., M.P.H. (2015) Pathologists Don't Always Agree On Breast Biopsy Atypia or DCIS. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • March 18, 2015
  • 05:52 AM
  • 142 views

The label of autism rarely exists in a diagnostic vacuum

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Most young ASD [autism spectrum disorder] children met the criteria for additional psychopathology." That was the primary conclusion reported by Fernando Salazar and colleagues [1].At the risk of sounding like a broken record going on and on about how the diagnosis/label of autism very rarely exists in a diagnostic vacuum when it comes to comorbidity, I did think it important that the findings of Salazar et al were [briefly] brought to your attention. I've talked a few times on this blog about the ESSENCE around autism (see here) and autism plus (see here) as putting some flesh on the scientific bones that the presentation of autism is often only one part of behaviour in those diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum. That and the plurality of autism..."Most common diagnoses were: generalized anxiety disorder (66.5 %), specific phobias (52.7 %) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (59.1 %)." The sorts of comorbid diagnoses listed most frequently by Salazar and colleagues are no strangers to autism comorbidity research as per some of my other musings on anxiety (see here) and ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) (see here).Anxiety in particular, has been something in receipt of quite a bit of research attention, whether it be through discussions on possible reasons why (see here) or associations made with more physical features also known to be over-represented following a diagnosis of autism (see here). I don't doubt that the hows and whys connecting autism and anxiety are likely to be complicated and quite individual. Indeed, from Salazar et al: "Higher IQ was associated with anxiety disorders" which kinda taps into some other work on the effect of insight on the presentation of anxiety (see here) for example.There's little more for me to say about the Salazar paper aside from pointing out the impressive authorship roll call included on the paper, including those who've also looked at more somatic comorbidity alongside the diagnosis of autism (see here) and horror of horrors, gut barrier issues appearing in some children on the spectrum (see here). Oh, and that comorbidity occurring alongside a diagnosis of autism doesn't always have to be psychological/behavioural is an important point to raise too...Music to close: Golden Brown by The Stranglers.----------[1] Salazar F. et al. Co-occurring Psychiatric Disorders in Preschool and Elementary School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. J Autism Dev Disord. 2015. March 4.----------Salazar, F., Baird, G., Chandler, S., Tseng, E., O’sullivan, T., Howlin, P., Pickles, A., & Simonoff, E. (2015). Co-occurring Psychiatric Disorders in Preschool and Elementary School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders DOI: 10.1007/s10803-015-2361-5... Read more »

Salazar, F., Baird, G., Chandler, S., Tseng, E., O’sullivan, T., Howlin, P., Pickles, A., & Simonoff, E. (2015) Co-occurring Psychiatric Disorders in Preschool and Elementary School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. DOI: 10.1007/s10803-015-2361-5  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.