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  • February 25, 2015
  • 08:17 AM
  • 38 views

High Fluoride in Drinking Water May Be Linked To Hypothyroidism

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Stephen Peckham Director, Centre for Health Services Studies Professor of Health Policy Department of Health Services Research and Policy London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Director, Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Healthcare System … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Professor Stephen Peckham. (2015) High Fluoride in Drinking Water May Be Linked To Hypothyroidism. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 25, 2015
  • 07:58 AM
  • 25 views

Shorter Hospital Stay For Hip Fracture Linked To Higher Mortality After Discharge

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Peter Nordström Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation Geriatrics, Umeå University Umeå, Sweden MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Prof. Nordström: The number of elderly people is increasing, while … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Prof. Peter Nordström. (2015) Shorter Hospital Stay For Hip Fracture Linked To Higher Mortality After Discharge. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 25, 2015
  • 07:34 AM
  • 35 views

New and Experienced Surgeons Have Similar Patient Mortality Rates

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Samuel D. Pimentel Doctoral student Statistics Department Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania   MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Surgical training has undergone major changes in recent … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Samuel D. Pimentel. (2015) New and Experienced Surgeons Have Similar Patient Mortality Rates. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 25, 2015
  • 05:31 AM
  • 111 views

Analysing the salivary proteome in autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper from Armand Ngounou Wetie and colleagues [1] (open-access here) reporting pilot results from a mass spectrometry based proteomic analysis of saliva in cases of autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with asymptomatic controls is served up for your reading delight today. There has already been some media attention about this paper (see here).It's an interesting paper for quite a few reasons; not least the continuing voyage of the analytical technique known as mass spectrometry into autism research (see here) and further beyond [2]. Mass spec by the way, represents a rather advanced way of looking at biological samples for potential biomarkers or compounds of interest to specific states or conditions (among other things). Ngounou Weite et al have some research form in this area as per a previous paper titled: 'Mass spectrometry as a tool for studying autism spectrum disorder' [3] which I would encourage you to peruse for some background reading.Their latest study delves into an interesting analytical medium, saliva, something we all generally have and importantly, something pretty non-invasive when it comes to collecting a sample [4]. "Using nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we found statistically significant differences in several salivary proteins" the authors report, comparing saliva samples from those with autism vs. asymptomatic controls. The sorts of differences detected between the groups - quite small groups (N=6 per) - tended to fall into the domain of 'immune function' as per issues with neutrophil elastase and various antigen binding sites of immunoglobulin. Indeed, the authors conclude: "Our results indicate that this is an effective method for identification of salivary protein biomarkers, support the concept that immune system and gastrointestinal disturbances may be present in individuals with ASDs." I would agree with those sentiments.Aside from the small participant groups and the fact that all participants were male and many carried some comorbidity (ADHD, epilepsy) alongside their autism label, 4 of the participants with autism were taking some kind of pharmaceutic/nutraceutical compared with none of the controls. As per other biomarker studies of autism, one always needs to be a little mindful of any effects from these factors particularly when looking at functional biofluids. In terms of the mass spec method, it all looks pretty comprehensive including the use of Q-ToF as the detector of choice and pooled group samples run in triplicate to ensure some kind of reproducibility in results. The authors did subject saliva samples to some preparation before analysis as per their focus on peptide content and a "full MS scan [that] covered the m/z range from 400 to 1,350". What this might mean is that some very low molecular weight compounds and indeed, potentially important larger compounds might have escaped their attention. But certainly I'm not going to quibble about this for now.Of course this is not the first time that saliva has been used as an analytical medium in autism research (see here) outside of just looking at parameters such as cortisol (see here). And I assume it won't be the last either...Music to close: Jane's Addiction and Stop.----------[1] Ngounou Wetie AG. et al. A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism Res. 2015 Jan 27. doi: 10.1002/aur.1450.[2] Dumas M-E. & Davidovic L. Metabolic Profiling and Phenotyping of Central Nervous System Diseases: Metabolites Bring Insights into Brain Dysfunctions. Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology. 2015. Jan 24.[3] Wood AG. et al. Mass spectrometry as a tool for studying autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Molecular Psychiatry 2013; 1: 6.[4] Wormwood KL. et al. Salivary proteomics and biomarkers in neurology and psychiatry. Proteomics Clin Appl. 2015 Jan 29.----------Ngounou Wetie AG, Wormwood KL, Russell S, Ryan JP, Darie CC, & Woods AG (2015). A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research PMID: 25626423... Read more »

Ngounou Wetie AG, Wormwood KL, Russell S, Ryan JP, Darie CC, & Woods AG. (2015) A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research. PMID: 25626423  

  • February 25, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 77 views

Consider the Landing Surface When Thinking About Landing Techniques

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

College athletes have decreased quadriceps:hamstring activation ratio, increased peak hamstring activation, and increased trunk sway when landing on an unstable surface versus a stable surface.
... Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 12:02 AM
  • 147 views

Can’t stand the sounds of chewing, loud breathing, or pen clicking? Dutch psychiatrists propose that may be the symptom of a new disorder

by Megan Cartwright in Science-Based Writing

Dutch psychiatrists have proposed that misophonia – a hypersensitivity to common, irritating noises like eating, loud breathing, and pen clicking – be classified as its own psychiatric disorder. After evaluating 42 Dutch patients with the disorder, the psychiatrists concluded that … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 24, 2015
  • 09:25 PM
  • 84 views

Personalized Medicine: Gene Predicts Neuropathy from Vincristine Chemotherapy

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: William E. Evans, Pharm.D. Member, Pharmaceutical Sciences St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Evans: We are currently curing over 85 percent of children with … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & William E. Evans, Pharm.D. (2015) Personalized Medicine: Gene Predicts Neuropathy from Vincristine Chemotherapy. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 09:03 PM
  • 74 views

Study Assesses Accuracy of Multiple Cardiovascular Risk Scores

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Andrew Paul DeFilippis, MD, MSc Assistant Professor of Medicine University of Louisville Director, Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Medical Director, Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit Adjunct Assistant Professor of Medicine Johns Hopkins University of Louisville Jewish Hospital Rudd Heart & … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Andrew Paul DeFilippis, MD, MSc. (2015) Study Assesses Accuracy of Multiple Cardiovascular Risk Scores. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 04:57 PM
  • 87 views

Anesthesia Drug and Deep Sleep Use Same Neural Circuits In Brain

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview Nick Franks FSB, FRCA, FMedSci, FRS, Professor of Biophysics and Anaesthetics, Professor William Wisden, Chair in Molecular Neuroscience Department of Life sciences Wolfson Laboratories, Imperial College, South Kensington, London, Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview, Nick Franks FSB, FRCA, FMedSci, FRS, Professor of Biophysics and Anaesthetics,, & Professor William Wisden,. (2015) Anesthesia Drug and Deep Sleep Use Same Neural Circuits In Brain. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 02:46 PM
  • 86 views

Formula Fed Babies May Have More Arsenic Exposure From Private Well Water

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Kathy Cottingham PhD Departmental of Biological Sciences Dartmouth University Hanover, NH Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Professor Cottingham: Arsenic is a naturally occurring element that occurs in … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Professor Kathy Cottingham PhD. (2015) Formula Fed Babies May Have More Arsenic Exposure From Private Well Water. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 01:58 PM
  • 73 views

CT Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines May Miss Some At Risk

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: David Mithun, M.D. Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Mithun: Lung cancer screening should be pursued for those people at highest risk … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & David Mithun, M.D. (2015) CT Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines May Miss Some At Risk. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 08:56 AM
  • 63 views

Signaling Pathways That Lead Pancreatic Cancer Identified

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Peter Storz, Ph.D. Associate Professor & Consultant Department of Cancer Biology Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, FL 32224   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Storz:   Our study focuses … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Peter Storz, Ph.D. (2015) Signaling Pathways That Lead Pancreatic Cancer Identified. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 08:48 AM
  • 67 views

Cognitive Function Test Helps Predict Future Memory Loss

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Rebecca E. Amariglio Ph.D. Massachusetts Alzheimers Disease Research Center Massachusetts General Hospital Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Amariglio: As the field of Alzheimer’s disease moves towards … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Rebecca E. Amariglio Ph.D. (2015) Cognitive Function Test Helps Predict Future Memory Loss. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 04:38 AM
  • 113 views

Maternal recall vs. medical records: implications for autism research

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't want to dwell too much on the findings reported by Paula Krakowiak and colleagues [1] talking about the accuracy of "maternally-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders, and reliability of BMI [body mass index] measurements during periconception and pregnancy compared with medical records when mothers are interviewed 2-5 years after delivery" but they are potentially important.With authors such as Krakowiak and Irva Hertz-Picciotto on the paper in question, those who follow the autism research scene might have already made the connection back to the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment) study (beincharge!) as the source of the current data. Indeed from CHARGE, findings such as a link between maternal obesity and offspring autism risk (see here) and maternal diabetes and autism (see here) have been previously discussed on this blog. For the most part, examination of such factors linked to subsequent offspring autism diagnosis has been through self-report and post-event questioning which potentially opens up such studies to various forms of bias.The results from Krakowiak et al seemed to suggest when questioned about such issues: "self-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders during periconception and pregnancy show high validity among mothers." Further: "Recall of pre-pregnancy BMI is reliable compared with self-reported values in medical records." In other words, still with some caution, families involved in initiatives such as CHARGE can and do quite accurately communicate their medical history. Of course this is not the first time that science has shown parentally-derived medical information to be pretty accurate when it comes to autism as per the Gorrindo findings [2]: "sensitive to the existence, although not necessarily the nature of" gastrointestinal issues related to autism (see here). That being said, developmental history recall is still subject to some forms of bias (see here).There's little more for me to say about this topic aside from highlighting how: "Multiparity was associated with higher discrepancies in BMI and misreporting of hypertensive disorders" suggestive that 'the state of having borne a number of children' might interfere with recall in these areas. Still, when it comes to asking parents about their health and wellbeing before, during and after the birth of their children with autism research in mind and without over-generalising, one might be a little less critical of the value of the information received.Music to close: The Flaming Lips and Race For The Prize. Scientists... don't race for the prize!----------[1] Krakowiak P. et al. Maternal Recall Versus Medical Records of Metabolic Conditions from the Prenatal Period: A Validation Study. Matern Child Health J. 2015 Feb 6.[2] Gorrindo P. et al. Gastrointestinal dysfunction in autism: parental report, clinical evaluation, and associated factors. Autism Res. 2012 Apr;5(2):101-8.----------Krakowiak P, Walker CK, Tancredi DJ, & Hertz-Picciotto I (2015). Maternal Recall Versus Medical Records of Metabolic Conditions from the Prenatal Period: A Validation Study. Maternal and child health journal PMID: 25656730... Read more »

  • February 24, 2015
  • 04:29 AM
  • 53 views

Finnish Sauna May Be Heart Healthy

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jari Laukkanen Cardiologist, MD, PhD Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition University of Eastern Finland Kuopio, Finland Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Laukkanen: We have been … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Jari Laukkanen Cardiologist, MD, PhD. (2015) Finnish Sauna May Be Heart Healthy. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 04:19 AM
  • 60 views

Researchers Examine Racial and Age Disparities in Cancer Survival

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Wei Zheng, MD, PhD Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Wei Zheng, MD, PhD. (2015) Researchers Examine Racial and Age Disparities in Cancer Survival. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 03:57 AM
  • 58 views

Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Should Be Considered For All Thick Melanomas

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Maki Yamamoto MD Health Sciences Clinical Assistant Professor UC Irvine Health University of California, Irvine Orange, CA 92868 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Yamamoto: The Multicenter Selective … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Maki Yamamoto MD. (2015) Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Should Be Considered For All Thick Melanomas. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 03:42 AM
  • 55 views

Too Much Time Spent Sitting, TV Viewing May Increase Sleep Problems

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Matthew Buman PhD Asst Professor SNHP Exercise & Wellness Arizona State University   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Buman: A lack of physical activity is a known … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Matthew Buman PhD Asst Professor. (2015) Too Much Time Spend Sitting, TV Viewing May Increase Sleep Problems. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 03:32 AM
  • 55 views

Molecular Biomarkers May Help Determine Which Melanomas Will Spread

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Iman Osman, MD Professor, Departments of Dermatology, Medicine and Urology Associate Director The Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center Director, Interdisciplinary Melanoma Program New York University Langone Medical Center New York, NY 10016 MedicalResearch: What is the … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Iman Osman, MD. (2015) Molecular Biomarkers May Help Determine Which Melanomas Will Spread. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 24, 2015
  • 03:13 AM
  • 46 views

Women With Heart Failure Less Likely To Be Referred For Specialty Care

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jennifer L. Cook, MD FAHA Assistant Professor of Medicine | Heart Failure and Transplantation Medical Director Left Ventricular Assist Device Program Medical University of South Carolina Charleston, SC 29425 Medical Research: What is the background for this … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Jennifer L. Cook, MD FAHA. (2015) Women With Heart Failure Less Likely To Be Referred For Specialty Care. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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