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  • January 20, 2016
  • 09:31 PM
  • 226 views

Students At Elite Universities Also View Asians As The Model Minority

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jerry Park, Ph.D. Associate professor of sociology Affiliate Fellow, Institute for Studies on Religion Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Park: Research … Continue reading →
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Jerry Park, Ph.D. (2016) Students At Elite Universities Also View Asians As The Model Minority. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 20, 2016
  • 08:54 PM
  • 245 views

Tasmanian Devils Have Given Rise To Two Distinct Transmissible Cancers

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Elizabeth Murchison Menzies Institute for Medical Research University of Tasmania Save the Tasmanian Devil Program Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and the Environment Hobart Australia Department of Veterinary Medicine University of Cambridge, Cambridge UK … Continue reading →
The post Tasmanian Devils Have Given Rise To Two Distinct Transmissible Cancers appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Dr. Elizabeth Murchison. (2016) Tasmanian Devils Have Given Rise To Two Distinct Transmissible Cancers. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 20, 2016
  • 06:37 PM
  • 303 views

Azithromycin Shortens Asthma Symptoms in Children

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Asthma on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Hans Bisgaard, MD, DMSc Professor of Pediatrics The Faculty of Health Sciences University of Copenhagen Head of the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood University  of Copenhagen and Naestved Hospital Medical … Continue reading →
The post Azithromycin Shortens Asthma Symptoms in Children appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Hans Bisgaard, MD, DMSc. (2016) Azithromycin Shortens Asthma Symptoms in Children. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 20, 2016
  • 06:05 PM
  • 185 views

Better Nursing Environment Linked To Lower Hospital Mortality

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Nursing Research on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jeffrey H. Silber, M.D., Ph.D. The Nancy Abramson Wolfson Professor of Health Services Research Professor of Pediatrics and Anesthesiology & Critical Care,  The University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine Professor … Continue reading →
The post Better Nursing Environment Linked To Lower Hospital Mortality appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Jeffrey H. Silber, M.D., Ph.D. (2016) Better Nursing Environment Linked To Lower Hospital Mortality. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 20, 2016
  • 06:00 PM
  • 175 views

Frail Patients Much More Likely To Die After Surgery

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Frailty on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Daniel I McIsaac, MD, MPH, FRCPC Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology Department of Anesthesiology The Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus Ottawa, ON Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. McIsaac: … Continue reading →
The post Frail Patients Much More Likely To Die After Surgery appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Dr. Daniel I McIsaac, MD, MPH, FRCPC. (2016) Frail Patients Much More Likely To Die After Surgery. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 20, 2016
  • 05:54 PM
  • 177 views

Infectious Endocarditis: Skin, Mouth Are Most Frequent Portals of Entry

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: François Delahaye, MD, PhD Department of Cardiology Hôpital Louis Pradel, Hospices Civils de Lyon Université Claude Bernard Lyon, France Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Response: Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe disease, with … Continue reading →
The post Infectious Endocarditis: Skin, Mouth Are Most Frequent Portals of Entry appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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François Delahaye, MD, PhD. (2016) Infectious Endocarditis: Skin, Mouth Are Most Frequent Portals of Entry. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 20, 2016
  • 05:44 PM
  • 264 views

Parkinson’s Disease: No Benefit from Physical Therapy in Mild to Moderate Disease

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More Interviews on Neurological Disorders on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Carl E Clarke Professor of Clinical Neurology and Honorary Consultant Neurologist Department of Neurology City Hospital Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust Birmingham UK  Medical Research: What is the background … Continue reading →
The post Parkinson’s Disease: No Benefit from Physical Therapy in Mild to Moderate Disease appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Professor Carl E Clarke. (2016) Parkinson's Disease: No Benefit from Physical Therapy in Mild to Moderate Disease. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 20, 2016
  • 04:29 PM
  • 323 views

Transplantation Patients With Skin Cancer: Fewer New Tumors With Sirolimus

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Dermatology from MedicalResearch.com  MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Pritesh S. Karia, MPH Manager-Dermatologic Oncology Research Program Mohs and Dermatologic Surgery Center Brigham and Women’s Hospital Boston, MA 02130  Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Response: Several recent … Continue reading →
The post Transplantation Patients With Skin Cancer: Fewer New Tumors With Sirolimus appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Pritesh S. Karia, MPH. (2016) Transplantation Patients With Skin Cancer: Fewer New Tumors With Sirolimus. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 20, 2016
  • 02:29 PM
  • 406 views

Overwhelmed and depressed? Well, there may be a connection

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever feel overwhelmed when you are depressed, well the good news is it isn't just you, the bad news is it's probably your brain. Regions of the brain that normally work together to process emotion become decoupled in people who experience multiple episodes of depression, neuroscientists report. The findings may help identify which patients will benefit from long term antidepressant treatment to prevent the recurrence of depressive episodes.

... Read more »

Jacobs, R., Barba, A., Gowins, J., Klumpp, H., Jenkins, L., Mickey, B., Ajilore, O., Peciña, M., Sikora, M., Ryan, K.... (2016) Decoupling of the amygdala to other salience network regions in adolescent-onset recurrent major depressive disorder. Psychological Medicine, 1-13. DOI: 10.1017/S0033291715002615  

  • January 20, 2016
  • 11:08 AM
  • 322 views

Water Jets In Schools Provide One Key To Reducing Childhood Obesity

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Obesity from MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Brian Elbel, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor, Department of Population Health, NYU Langone Medical Center Amy Schwartz, PhD, Director, New York University Institute for Education and Social Policy, and the Daniel Patrick Moynihan … Continue reading →
The post Water Jets In Schools Provide One Key To Reducing Childhood Obesity appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Brian Elbel, PhD, MPH, Amy Schwartz, PhD,, & Michele Leardo, MA,. (2016) Water Jets In Schools Provide One Key To Reducing Childhood Obesity. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 20, 2016
  • 06:55 AM
  • 361 views

Pump Up Your Brain

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Exercising makes you smarter! Preadolescents who begin exercising score better on a cognitive assessment not unlike an IQ test. They also perform better on a math test, even though no additional math instruction was given. But to maximize the increase in neural plasticity, you have to exercise several times a week for months. The weirdest part – different types of exercise alter different neurotrophins, so to be your smartest, you need to do aerobic training and resistance training. ... Read more »

  • January 20, 2016
  • 06:06 AM
  • 373 views

Dear kids, don't eat that falling snow...

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Snow falling in urban areas could be toxic for human beings due to the presence of dangerous chemicals and pollutants coming from cars and industries.

Published in:

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts

Study Further:

Beauty can be dangerous and recent research is showing the same, i.e. beautiful and pure snowflakes can be dangerous. Researchers have found that snowflakes are not as clean as they may appear. They reported that snow falling, especially in cities, has the ability to absorb toxic as well as carcinogenic chemicals and pollutants released from car exhausts. Moreover, the interaction between those dangerous chemicals and snows can also produce new types of toxic chemicals.

Snowflakes have different types of surfaces, some of which are able to absorb particulate pollutants and gaseous materials. Researchers simulated the research in a “snow chamber”, and found that snow can absorb pollutant particles in the air surrounding the snow. This research shows two important points; One is that it is better for people living in snowy environment as it could help in purification of environment, and the other is that the level of pollutants can rise, when snow melts. So, researchers and experts of climate have to consider this public health threat.

“The alteration of exhaust aerosol size distributions at freezing temperatures and in the presence of snow, accompanied by changes of the organic pollutant content in snow, has potential to alter health effects of human exposure to vehicle exhaust” researchers wrote in the paper.

This research also shows that you have to forbid your kids from eating snowflakes falling in urban areas.

Source:

Nazarenko, Y., Kurien, U., Nepotchatykh, O., Rangel-Alvarado, R., & Ariya, P. (2016). Role of snow and cold environment in the fate and effects of nanoparticles and select organic pollutants from gasoline engine exhaust Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts DOI: 10.1039/C5EM00616C... Read more »

  • January 20, 2016
  • 03:11 AM
  • 319 views

Middle ear infections and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm gonna be fairly brief today in drawing your attention to the paper published by Daniel Adams and colleagues [1] reporting that: "Children with ASD [autism spectrum disorders] are more likely to have middle ear infections and otitis-related complications."The results, which we've known were coming (see here), detail findings based on a retrospective case-cohort study where the health insurance records of children of US military families were initially screened for the presence of autism or an ASD and then further screened for ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes relevant to acute otitis media and related diagnoses. The supplementary material provided alongside the article gives further details (see here).Alongside the findings of an elevated rate of acute otitis media (AOM) among children diagnosed with autism were various other details including a higher rate of complications following AOM such as mastoiditis - affecting the mastoid bone behind the ear - and the requirement for a mastoidectomy. The surgical reconstruction of the eardrum (tympanoplasty) was also more frequently noted for the autism group versus the non-autism controls. The authors conclude that quite a bit more research is required in this area alongside "highlighting the importance of routine middle ear examinations and close attention to hearing impairment in this population."This is interesting work. For many years I've heard about how quite a few children on the autism spectrum had a history of early ear infections that were typically followed by quite an aggressive schedule of antibiotic use. Indeed, on one of the previous blogging occasions when I've mentioned ear infections and autism it was to speculate on the double-edged sword that might be the [early repeated] use of antibiotics with [some] autism in mind (see here). That 'association' remains as relevant today as it did during earlier descriptions [2] playing into the various emerging gut bacteria studies of autism.I have only a few more things to add. First is the idea that screening for middle ear infections might be an important issue for children on the autism spectrum. I can't argue with that; and indeed added to the requirement for screening other sensory gateways such as the eyes (see here), the evidence is accumulating for preferential services to be offered. Second is the idea that recurrent otitis media might show some connection with aspects of sleep too [3] such that issues such as sleep apnoea occurring alongside autism (see here) might also be something to look out for. Finally is the need for quite a bit more research on what happens to autistic symptoms when ear infections are finally diagnosed and treated. Take for example the case report detailed by Kazuhiro Tajima-Pozo and colleagues [4] and the suggestion that surgical correction of the "middle ear for repetitive otitis" correlated with "an improvement in autistic behaviours". One wonders how many other children have shown or might show similar effects and what the possible mechanism(s) could be...Music: Alanis Morissette - Ironic.----------[1] Adams DJ. et al. Otitis Media and Related Complications Among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. J Autism Dev Disorders. 2016. Jan 6.[2] Bolte ER. Autism and Clostridium tetani. Med Hypotheses. 1998 Aug;51(2):133-44.[3] Gozal D. et al. Prevalence of Recurrent Otitis Media in Habitually Snoring School-Aged Children. Sleep medicine. 2008;9(5):549-554.[4] Tajima-Pozo K. et al. Otitis and autism spectrum disorders. BMJ Case Rep. 2010 May 6;2010. pii: bcr1020092351.----------Adams, D., Susi, A., Erdie-Lalena, C., Gorman, G., Hisle-Gorman, E., Rajnik, M., Elrod, M., & Nylund, C. (2016). Otitis Media and Related Complications Among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders DOI: 10.1007/s10803-015-2689-x... Read more »

Adams, D., Susi, A., Erdie-Lalena, C., Gorman, G., Hisle-Gorman, E., Rajnik, M., Elrod, M., & Nylund, C. (2016) Otitis Media and Related Complications Among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. DOI: 10.1007/s10803-015-2689-x  

  • January 19, 2016
  • 11:45 PM
  • 342 views

A year in books: Neanderthals to the National Cancer Act to now

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

A tradition I started a couple of years ago is to read at least one non-fiction book per month and then to share my thoughts on the reading at the start of the following year. Last year, my dozen books were mostly on philosophy, psychology, and political economy. My brief comments on them ended up […]... Read more »

Monge, J., Kricun, M., Radovčić, J., Radovčić, D., Mann, A., & Frayer, D. (2013) Fibrous Dysplasia in a 120,000 Year Old Neandertal from Krapina, Croatia. PLoS ONE, 8(6). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0064539  

  • January 19, 2016
  • 11:00 PM
  • 167 views

Heart Wall Thickness Linked To Ventricular Arrhythmias

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Heart Disease on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Yitschak (Yitsik) Biton, MD Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Rochester Medical Center Saunders Research Building Heart Research Follow-Up Program Rochester, NY Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What … Continue reading →
The post Heart Wall Thickness Linked To Ventricular Arrhythmias appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Yitschak (Yitsik) Biton, MD. (2016) Heart Wall Thickness Linked To Ventricular Arrhythmias. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 19, 2016
  • 07:34 PM
  • 194 views

Does Slow Heart Rate Signal Increased Heart Disease or Mortality Risk?

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Heart Disease on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ajay Dharod, M.D. Coordinator of Medical Informatics Department of Internal Medicine Wake Forest School of Medicine Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. … Continue reading →
The post Does Slow Heart Rate Signal Increased Heart Disease or Mortality Risk? appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Ajay Dharod, M.D. (2016) Does Slow Heart Rate Signal Increased Heart Disease or Mortality Risk?. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 19, 2016
  • 07:17 PM
  • 142 views

Poor Diet Means Poor Sleep

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Sleep on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Ph.D, FAHA Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center Institute of Human Nutrition College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University New York, NY 10032   Medical Research: What … Continue reading →
The post Poor Diet Means Poor Sleep appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Ph.D, FAHA. (2016) Poor Diet Means Poor Sleep. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 19, 2016
  • 05:09 PM
  • 143 views

Low Birth Weight Linked To Early Puberty and Shortened Stature

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Obgyne on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sandra Schulte (candidate Medicine) University Hospital Bonn Dept. Ped. Endocrinology and Diabetology MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main  findings? Response: Low birth weight, unfavourable intrauterine conditions … Continue reading →
The post Low Birth Weight Linked To Early Puberty and Shortened Stature appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Sandra Schulte. (2016) Low Birth Weight Linked To Early Puberty and Shortened Stature. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 19, 2016
  • 07:16 AM
  • 138 views

Sleep Fragmentation Linked To Damaged Brain Blood Vessels

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

More on Sleep Research on MedicalResearch.com MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Andrew Lim MD, FRCPC Assistant Professor Neurology Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Toronto, ON Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Lim: Our group had previously … Continue reading →
The post Sleep Fragmentation Linked To Damaged Brain Blood Vessels appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
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Dr. Andrew Lim MD, FRCPC. (2016) Sleep Fragmentation Linked To Damaged Brain Blood Vessels. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 19, 2016
  • 04:29 AM
  • 324 views

Get your (autism genetics) kicks on root 66?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

With the ever-increasing volumes of research being published in the peer-reviewed domain these days, one sometimes has to be a little creative to ensure that your research paper stands out and is not lost in the scientific noise. Quite a good way of getting noticed is to make sure that your paper catches the attention of your reader base. Y'know, give it a snappy title; something that social media might pick up on...So it was that my attention was taken when coming across the paper by Diaz-Beltran and colleagues [1] (open-access) titled: 'A common molecular signature in ASD gene expression: following Root 66 to autism'. Root 66 and Route 66 eh?The 'root 66' appearing in the title of the Diaz-Beltran paper actually refers to the results of an "integrated systems biology analysis of 9 independent gene expression experiments covering 657 autism, 9 mental retardation and developmental delay and 566 control samples to determine if a common signature exists and to test whether regulatory patterns in the brain relevant to autism can also be detected in blood." I might add that those are the authors words and not my own.Including a familiar name on the authorship list - one Dennis Wall, he of 'boiling down ADOS' and 'screening triage by YouTube' fame - researchers used various automated statistical methods to see whether "a signature of autism can be found in the blood that might be a molecular echo of autism-related regulatory impairment in the brain." The identified signature included a collection of 66 genes based on their examination of "27 case–control biosets of 9 independent experiments" - the root 66 cluster.That root 66 cluster was subsequently tested to see what genes might be connected and some data about "related biological functions" across various conditions including autism. I really can't provide anything more detailed about the hows and whys of this process as I am fast approaching the limits of my knowledge in this area. Suffice to say that there was some previous work on some of the root 66 genes with autism in mind (4 genes) and quite a few others "have been shown to interact directly with known autism candidates or have been implicated in other autism-related neurological disorders."When it came to looking at what those root 66 genes might be doing (functionally), the authors reported that quite a few of the genes were involved in one of three processes: (1) brain growth and development with a side-order of "neuroendocrine activity", (2) nervous system inflammation and loss of neurological functions, and (3) neurodegeneration "and damage of the nervous system." In that last category the authors made an important point that genes thought to be connected with cases of autism are generally not 'autism-specific' in terms of their possible connections with other conditions and labels. Without scaremongering or wishing to equate autism with cancer, some of the root 66 genes have been mentioned with various cancers in mind; something that might be important for at least some people on the autism spectrum (see here). On the basis of their collected studies, they concluded that: "the Root 66 cluster is non-random and likely plays a role unique to autism."It is important to understand that whilst this is an important piece of research, further independent validation of the root 66 cluster is required before anyone gets ahead of themselves. As per other examples where genetic 'markers' have been talked about (see here), replication is the name of the scientific game bearing in mind how wide the autism spectrum is (the autisms) and the important idea that the label rarely appears in some sort of diagnostic vacuum (see here). I don't believe that we are witnessing a genetic profile for [all] autism just yet...Before I go, I do also want to comment on at least one area where the genetics of autism seems to be heading: inflammation. As per other research occasions, inflammation and immune function seem to be quite a regular feature of autism genetics studies (see here and see here) and the analysis of more functional biological processes (see here for example). Added to some interesting data on a possible role for those chemical messengers called cytokines with autism in mind (see here) and it looks to me like we have further evidence for how immune function and behaviour might have some interesting connections pertinent to at least some autism (see here).Music: Amy Winehouse - Back To Black.----------[1] Diaz-Beltran L. et al. A common molecular signature in ASD gene expression: following Root 66 to autism. Translational Psychiatry. 2016. 6, e705.----------Diaz-Beltran L, Esteban FJ, & Wall DP (2016). A common molecular signature in ASD gene expression: following Root 66 to autism. Translational psychiatry, 6 PMID: 26731442... Read more »

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