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  • March 10, 2017
  • 06:05 AM
  • 231 views

Spontaneous Pneumothorax and air travel in BHD Syndrome

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Previous studies show that BHD syndrome causes spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) in 24-38% of patients, with a recurrence rate of up to 75% (Toro et al., 2007; Toro et al., 2008; Houweling et al., 2011). A common preventative strategy used following an initial SP in patients with BHD is pleurodesis, however, its efficacy in preventing recurrent episodes is not well known. Due to the pressure changes during air travel, cystic air spaces expand and compress in the thorax possibly leading to cyst ruptu........ Read more »

Gupta N, Kopras EJ, Henske EP, James LE, El-Chemaly S, Veeraraghavan S, Drake MG, & McCormack FX. (2017) Spontaneous Pneumothoraces in Patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome. Annals of the American Thoracic Society. PMID: 28248571  

  • March 10, 2017
  • 05:00 AM
  • 219 views

Running Shoes and the Preferred Motion Pathway

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Running Shoes and the Preferred Motion Pathway... Read more »

Nigg BM, Vienneau J, Smith AC, Trudeau MB, Mohr M, & Nigg SR. (2017) The Preferred Movement Path Paradigm: Influence of Running Shoes on Joint Movement. Medicine and science in sports and exercise. PMID: 28277405  

  • March 10, 2017
  • 02:37 AM
  • 248 views

I would walk 500 miles... or maybe just 8 miles (a day).

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Desk-bound workers should ‘walk EIGHT miles a day’ to slash risk of heart attacks or stroke" went one headline talking about the findings reported by William Tigbe and colleagues [1]. Drawing on data from over 110 postal workers - "(55 office-workers, 5 women, and 56 walking/delivery-workers, 10 women)" - who wore "activPAL physical activity monitors for seven days", researchers observed some potentially important trends.Alongside wearing their activity monitors, participants were also asse........ Read more »

  • March 9, 2017
  • 03:06 AM
  • 256 views

"Relatives of individuals with ASD were at higher risk of ADHD"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Individuals with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and their relatives are at increased risk of ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder]."So said the paper published by Laura Ghirardi and colleagues [1] (open-access) who studied "1 899 654 individuals born in Sweden between 1987 and 2006" and identified some 28,000 cases of ASD and 82,000 cases of ADHD "with 13 793 individuals... being comorbid cases."Results: "Individuals with ASD were at higher risk of having ADHD, co........ Read more »

Ghirardi L, Brikell I, Kuja-Halkola R, Freitag CM, Franke B, Asherson P, Lichtenstein P, & Larsson H. (2017) The familial co-aggregation of ASD and ADHD: a register-based cohort study. Molecular psychiatry. PMID: 28242872  

  • March 8, 2017
  • 04:30 AM
  • 214 views

Cartilage Degradation After ACL Altered by Early Injection

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A corticosteroid injection performed within the first 5 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament injury resulted in significantly less of an increase in cartilage degradation markers in comparison to placebo injections.... Read more »

Lattermann, C., Jacobs, C., Proffitt Bunnell, M., Huston, L., Gammon, L., Johnson, D., Reinke, E., Huebner, J., Kraus, V., & Spindler, K. (2017) A Multicenter Study of Early Anti-inflammatory Treatment in Patients With Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 45(2), 325-333. DOI: 10.1177/0363546516666818  

  • March 8, 2017
  • 03:09 AM
  • 228 views

Blocking FRAAs and thyroid function in autism (continued)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Readers of this post are advised to check out a previous blogging occasion describing how 'FRAAs - folate receptor alpha autoantibodies - may correlate with reduced thyroid function in cases of autism' before heading into this entry on the recent paper published by Richard Frye and colleagues [1].You're back already? OK, well just in case you didn't read that last entry (😉), it's worthwhile first noting that: "Folate receptor α (FRα) autoantibodies (FRAAs) are prevalent in autism spectrum d........ Read more »

  • March 7, 2017
  • 11:01 AM
  • 260 views

Can Older Drivers Benefit From Training?

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Older drivers are over-represented in motor-vehicle driving accidents.The lowest rate of fatal vehicle crashes per 100 million miles driven is found in drivers between the ages of 30-69 years of age.Fatal vehicle driving rates per miles driven is 4 to 5 times higher in drivers over 80 years of age. (IIHS.org data)So can older drivers be trained or educated to improve their safety (and the safety o those around them)?A recent randomized controlled trial examined an educational intervention in dri........ Read more »

  • March 7, 2017
  • 04:23 AM
  • 266 views

Herbal medicines 'for' ADHD systematically reviewed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Dennis Anheyer and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) is offered up for your reading consumption today, and the results of a review of the available published science - "Only randomized controlled trails (RCT)" (authors' spelling mistake not mine) - looking at the use of herbal medicines for the treatment/management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).OK I know some people read the term 'herbal medicine' and automatically think 'woo'. If I instead use th........ Read more »

  • March 6, 2017
  • 06:19 AM
  • 227 views

Patent for Stimulation of Brodmann Areas 1-48 and all other structures

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic





Fig 1 (Roskams-Edriset al., 2017). The number of patents implicating specific brain regions has risen from 1976 to the mid 2010s. Results were obtained by searching The Lens patent database (http://lens.org/).


“What is the ethical value of awarding patent rights that implicate regions of the brain?”

Do the applicants intend to patent the function of specific brain areas? This absurd

... Read more »

Roskams-Edris, D., Anderson-Redick, S., Kiss, Z., & Illes, J. (2017) Situating brain regions among patent rights and moral risks. Nature Biotechnology, 35(2), 119-121. DOI: 10.1038/nbt.3782  

  • March 6, 2017
  • 04:25 AM
  • 263 views

"Logical fallacies in animal model research"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A paper which is a bit 'out of left field' is presented for your reading pleasure today and how one should be rather careful about how animal research - "with focus on animal models of mental illness" - is translated into relevance to humans [1].The paper by Espen Sjoberg is pertinent to various diagnostic labels including depression and schizophrenia. I would perhaps disagree with the author including autism under the specific heading of 'mental illness' (bearing in mind various mental hea........ Read more »

Sjoberg EA. (2017) Logical fallacies in animal model research. Behavioral and Brain Functions. info:/10.1186/s12993-017-0121-8

  • March 4, 2017
  • 06:23 PM
  • 183 views

More non-translatable orthotic research

by Craig Payne in Its a Foot Captain, But Not as You Know It

More non-translatable orthotic research... Read more »

  • March 4, 2017
  • 04:43 AM
  • 243 views

Fatigue in adults with a 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The genetic condition called 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) has, on occasion, provided some research fodder for this blog (see here and see here). The reason for its inclusion here has tended to be around the 'overlap' in the presentation of 22q11.2 and autism/autistic features and the importance of appropriate screening as and when an autism diagnosis is received (see here). Remember: receipt of an autism diagnosis is a starting point not the finishing line.Today I'm once again talk........ Read more »

Vergaelen E, Claes S, Kempke S, & Swillen A. (2017) High prevalence of fatigue in adults with a 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. American journal of medical genetics. Part A. PMID: 28190295  

  • March 4, 2017
  • 03:22 AM
  • 215 views

Is changing footstrike pattern beneficial to runners?

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Is changing footstrike pattern beneficial to runners?... Read more »

  • March 3, 2017
  • 11:05 PM
  • 198 views

All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

by ragothamanyennamalli in Getting to know Structural Bioinformatics

With increasing computational power (aka GPU) that can be accessed these days, it is no wonder that performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulation for a longer time, with duplicates and/or triplicates, has become easier.... Read more »

  • March 3, 2017
  • 05:14 AM
  • 183 views

Rare Disease Day – Findacure Scientific Conference: Drug Repurposing for Rare Diseases

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

This year’s Findacure Scientific Conference took place in London on Rare Disease Day and was again focused on Drug Repurposing for Rare Diseases. The conference brought together over 100 representatives from patient groups, researchers and members of the healthcare industry to discuss the importance and the latest developments in drug repurposing for rare diseases.... Read more »

  • March 3, 2017
  • 02:56 AM
  • 255 views

Poverty status and autism, ADHD and asthma

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Christian Pulcini and colleagues [1] talking about poverty status potentially influencing "parent-reported lifetime prevalence and comorbidities" when it comes to three target conditions (autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD] and asthma) should have been a call to action. Concluding that "poor and near poor children had a higher lifetime prevalence of asthma and ADHD, but not ASD [autism spectrum disorder]" [2], some of the findings have instead attracted crit........ Read more »

Pulcini CD, Zima BT, Kelleher KJ, & Houtrow AJ. (2017) Poverty and Trends in Three Common Chronic Disorders. Pediatrics. PMID: 28193790  

  • March 2, 2017
  • 12:19 PM
  • 249 views

Improving Hearing-Aid Access in Older Adults

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

There are significant barriers to widespread use of hearing-aids in older adults with age-related hearing loss.Sensitivity to the stigma of wearing a hearing-aid is one barrier.Cost is another significant barrier. In the U.S., bilateral hearing-aid purchase amounts to a cost of $2400 to $5800. This cost is typically not covered by Medicare or other health insurance plans.I ran into a interesting manuscript on looking at an alternative less costlier approach to hearing-aid selection and purchase......... Read more »

  • March 2, 2017
  • 03:11 AM
  • 263 views

Subgroups in autism (without intellectual disability)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] without ID [intellectual disability] could be differentiated into Moderate and Severe Social Impairment subgroups when core ASD symptoms were more closely examined."So said the findings reported by Felicity Klopper and colleagues [1] looking at an important part of the autism research scene related to the 'plurality' of the term autism and the seemingly vast range of presentations included under the label. Reliant on data obtained........ Read more »

Felicity Klopper, Renee Testa, Christos Pantelis, & Efstratios Skafidas. (2017) A cluster analysis exploration of autism spectrum disorder subgroups in children without intellectual disability. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders. info:/10.1016/j.rasd.2017.01.006

  • March 1, 2017
  • 04:30 AM
  • 218 views

Timing is Everything & Fatigue is Inevitable

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Athletes suffered more lower extremity injuries towards the middle to end of the competition and practices, which suggest that fatigue may play a role in lower extremity injury risk.... Read more »

  • March 1, 2017
  • 03:13 AM
  • 251 views

Sex and age might affect comorbidity profiles in autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Supekar and colleagues [1] provides some food for thought today specifically with the idea that comorbidity profiles accompanying autism might be influenced by age and gender in mind.To quote: "These results highlight crucial differences between cross-sectional comorbidity patterns and their interactions with sex and age, which may aid in the development of effective sex- and age-specific diagnostic/treatment strategies for ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and comorbid condi........ Read more »

Supekar K, Iyer T, & Menon V. (2017) The influence of sex and age on prevalence rates of comorbid conditions in autism. Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research. PMID: 28188687  

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