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  • January 1, 2017
  • 01:20 AM
  • 258 views

Antibiotic cream is NOT 100% effective in preventing Lyme disease

by Microbe Fan in Spirochetes Unwound

A topical antibiotic cream applied to tick bites did not perform any better than placebo in preventing Lyme disease, according to results of a randomized clinical trial conducted in Europe.  The study was published in Lancet Infectious Diseases.I wasn't planning to blog about the study, but I changed my mind after a reader emailed me a link to a news article reporting that the antibiotic cream was 100% effective.  The lead investigator even claimed, "None of the test subjects went on t........ Read more »

Schwameis M, Kündig T, Huber G, von Bidder L, Meinel L, Weisser R, Aberer E, Härter G, Weinke T, Jelinek T.... (2016) Topical azithromycin for the prevention of Lyme borreliosis: a randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 3 efficacy trial. The Lancet. Infectious Diseases. PMID: 28007428  

  • December 30, 2016
  • 06:30 PM
  • 280 views

This Month in Blastocystis Research (DEC 2016)

by Christen Rune Stensvold in Blastocystis Parasite Blog

2016 is coming to an end, and in the last post of the year, I highlight three of the most important articles on Blastocystis published in 2016.... Read more »

Scanlan PD, Knight R, Song SJ, Ackermann G, & Cotter PD. (2016) Prevalence and genetic diversity of Blastocystis in family units living in the United States. Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases, 95-97. PMID: 27545648  

Kurt Ö, Doğruman Al F, & Tanyüksel M. (2016) Eradication of Blastocystis in humans: Really necessary for all?. Parasitology international, 65(6 Pt B), 797-801. PMID: 26780545  

  • December 30, 2016
  • 02:51 PM
  • 298 views

What is Turmeric and How to Use it to Prevent of Heart Diseases

by Maggie Martin in United Academics

If you are thinking of using turmeric for heart disease, first understand how it works and then know how it is supposed to be consumed. Turmeric works in numerous ways to boost heart health. It is considered a powerful antioxidant with an active ingredient known as curcumin, responsible for the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties of turmeric.... Read more »

Govindarajan, V., & Stahl, W. (2009) Turmeric — chemistry, technology, and quality. C R C Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 12(3), 199-301. DOI: 10.1080/10408398009527278  

  • December 30, 2016
  • 07:05 AM
  • 284 views

Annual review 2016

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

2016 has been a busy year for BHD research. With the new year approaching, this week’s blog will review the studies we’ve particularly enjoyed writing about and revisit the year’s highlights.... Read more »

Gupta, N., Sunwoo, B., & Kotloff, R. (2016) Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome. Clinics in Chest Medicine, 37(3), 475-486. DOI: 10.1016/j.ccm.2016.04.010  

  • December 29, 2016
  • 08:20 PM
  • 335 views

Believe in miracles... and yourself

by Aurametrix team in Aurametrix Blog

End of the year is a very special time as Holiday lights melt away our inner Grinch and we start to believe in miracles and new beginnings. ​Belief is not a religious phenomenon. It is our way of coping with the future and finding existential meaning. Scientific studies show that belief in miracles contributes to greater life satisfaction. Belief in science and technological progress can make people satisfied with their lives even more. The stronger the sense of personal control, the higher s........ Read more »

  • December 28, 2016
  • 05:00 AM
  • 292 views

Sometimes academics do overthink things

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Sometimes academics do overthink things. I call it limping... Read more »

  • December 28, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 308 views

Ocular Injuries May Not Be the Most Common, But Are They Easily Preventable?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Sport-related ocular injuries are most commonly open wounds to the eye or surrounding visual structures. Advocating for, or implementing rule changes to require protective eyewear could greatly mitigate this risk.... Read more »

Haring RS, Sheffield ID, Canner JK, & Schneider EB. (2016) Epidemiology of Sports-Related Eye Injuries in the United States. JAMA ophthalmology, 134(12), 1382-1390. PMID: 27812702  

  • December 27, 2016
  • 06:10 AM
  • 359 views

2016 autism research review on Questioning Answers

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Time flies! Once again, I'm posting my annual 'state of the science' autism research review, this time covering the particularly unusual year of 2016.With around 300 blog entries to choose from, I'm changing the format this year to list a 'top 5' of areas where I think some scientific progress has been made. The caveat as ever being that there are still mountains to climb in terms of delineating aetiology, nature and importantly, how one can actually improve quality of life for those on the........ Read more »

Waterhouse, L., London, E., & Gillberg, C. (2016) ASD Validity. Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 3(4), 302-329. DOI: 10.1007/s40489-016-0085-x  

  • December 23, 2016
  • 06:43 AM
  • 344 views

Establishment of a new BHD Syndrome cell line

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is caused by mutations in the FLCN gene. The FLCN protein acts as a tumour suppressor and BHD patients have a high risk of developing renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The mechanisms of tumour formation in BHD have been investigated using mouse models and human RCC tissues. However, in vitro signalling studies of human renal cells with mutant FLCN are still scarce. In a recent study, Furuya et al. (2016) established a new cell line from a BHD patient’s chromophobe ........ Read more »

  • December 23, 2016
  • 05:13 AM
  • 361 views

Bad news for DARPA's RAM program: Electrical Stimulation of Entorhinal Region Impairs Memory

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic





The neural machinery that forms new memories is fragile and vulnerable to insults arising from brain injuries, cerebral anoxia, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Unlike language, which shows a great deal of plasticity after strokes and other injuries, episodic memory – memory for autobiographical events and contextual details of past experiences – doesn't recover after

... Read more »

  • December 23, 2016
  • 05:03 AM
  • 390 views

ADHD symptoms and chronic fatigue syndrome?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

With the pinnacle of the season of 'jolly' almost upon us, I'd like to make some brief discussion on the findings reported by Denise Rogers and colleagues [1] and specifically the observation that: "ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] symptoms were significantly greater in the CFS [chronic fatigue syndrome] group than in HC [healthy controls]."With the aim of examining both the prevalence of fatigue in cases of ADHD and the prevalence of ADHD symptoms in adults wi........ Read more »

  • December 23, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 330 views

Do Low Neurocognitive Scores Increase the Risk of Injury?

by Stephan Bodkin in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

An athlete with low baseline neurocognitive scores is likely to produce knee movement patterns that are associated to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury.... Read more »

  • December 22, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 352 views

More Is Better: Exercise Therapy for the Ankle

by Kyle Kosik in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Exercise therapy and external supports reduce the chance of an ankle sprain; increasing the volume of exercise further reduces the odds.... Read more »

  • December 22, 2016
  • 03:31 AM
  • 386 views

Psychosis (sometimes) as an immune disorder?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Some psychosis cases an 'immune disorder'" went the BBC headline with reference to the paper by Belinda Lennox and colleagues [1] talking about the detection of antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in cases of first-episode psychosis (FEP).Although by no means a universal phenomenon, researchers reported that 3% of their 228 participants diagnosed with FEP who provided a blood sample showed the presence of NMDAR antibodies compared with none of the healthy controls ........ Read more »

  • December 21, 2016
  • 06:02 AM
  • 421 views

"New form of autism found"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"New form of autism found" went one of the headlines reporting on the paper by Dora C. Tărlungeanu and colleagues [1] and findings that "elucidate a neurological syndrome defined by SLC7A5 mutations and support an essential role for the BCAA [branched-chain amino acids] in human brain function." This work continues a rather important research story talking about how one 'type' of autism might have some important roots in relation to the branched-chain amino acids and their m........ Read more »

Tărlungeanu, D., Deliu, E., Dotter, C., Kara, M., Janiesch, P., Scalise, M., Galluccio, M., Tesulov, M., Morelli, E., Sonmez, F.... (2016) Impaired Amino Acid Transport at the Blood Brain Barrier Is a Cause of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Cell, 167(6), 1481-2147483647. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.11.013  

  • December 21, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 339 views

Colder May Not Be Cool for Recovery

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

After exercise, cold water immersion at 15°C may offer some improvements in recovery based on performance of a jump task and possibly markers of muscle damage. A colder temperature may not be as effective as cool water, so controlling the treatment parameters based on evidence is important.... Read more »

Vieira, A., Siqueira, A., Ferreira-Junior, J., do Carmo, J., Durigan, J., Blazevich, A., & Bottaro, M. (2016) The Effect of Water Temperature during Cold-Water Immersion on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 37(12), 937-943. DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-111438  

  • December 20, 2016
  • 04:33 AM
  • 408 views

Generation R does gestational vitamin D levels and autistic traits

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Gestational vitamin D deficiency was associated with autism-related traits in a large population-based sample. Because gestational vitamin D deficiency is readily preventable with safe, cheap and accessible supplements, this candidate risk factor warrants closer scrutiny."So said the findings reported by Vinkhuyzen and colleagues [1] (open-access) reporting on data derived from "the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort from fetal life onward, based in Rotterdam, The Netherl........ Read more »

Vinkhuyzen AA, Eyles DW, Burne TH, Blanken LM, Kruithof CJ, Verhulst F, Jaddoe VW, Tiemeier H, & McGrath JJ. (2016) Gestational vitamin D deficiency and autism-related traits: the Generation R Study. Molecular psychiatry. PMID: 27895322  

  • December 20, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 344 views

Is High School Specialization Needed to Participate at the Division I Level?

by Adam Lake in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The majority of athletes participating in NCAA Division I sports reported that they were not highly specialized in that sport during high school.... Read more »

Post, E., Thein-Nissenbaum, J., Stiffler, M., Brooks, M., Bell, D., Sanfilippo, J., Trigsted, S., Heiderscheit, B., & McGuine, T. (2016) High School Sport Specialization Patterns of Current Division I Athletes. Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. DOI: 10.1177/1941738116675455  

  • December 19, 2016
  • 03:19 AM
  • 410 views

Gut barrier integrity meets blood-brain barrier integrity with autism in mind

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"In the ASD [autism spectrum disorder] brain, there is an altered expression of genes associated with BBB [blood-brain barrier] integrity coupled with increased neuroinflammation and possibly impaired gut barrier integrity."Although pretty enthused to see research linking names like Anna Sapone, Tim Buie and Alessio Fasano in the recent paper published by Maria Fiorentino and colleagues [1] (open-access), I was slightly less impressed with the use of the term 'the ASD brain' ........ Read more »

Fiorentino, M., Sapone, A., Senger, S., Camhi, S., Kadzielski, S., Buie, T., Kelly, D., Cascella, N., & Fasano, A. (2016) Blood–brain barrier and intestinal epithelial barrier alterations in autism spectrum disorders. Molecular Autism, 7(1). DOI: 10.1186/s13229-016-0110-z  

  • December 18, 2016
  • 12:41 AM
  • 316 views

On the Interpretation of Neuroscientific Findings

by Justin A. Sattin in The Ghost of Charcot

A review of classic "split brain" research and critique of a new paper regarding "functional" splits in brain function.... Read more »

Sasai, S., Boly, M., Mensen, A., & Tononi, G. (2016) Functional split brain in a driving/listening paradigm. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(50), 14444-14449. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1613200113  

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