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  • July 7, 2015
  • 03:21 PM
  • 15 views

Pupil response predicts depression risk in kids

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Most parents don’t want to think about their children as depressed, but that can be a deadly mistake. Short of clinical diagnosis through cost prohibitive therapy, there is no real way to tell if a child is at risk for depression. However, according to new research from Binghamton University , how much a child’s pupil dilates in response to seeing an emotional image can predict his or her risk of depression over the next two years.... Read more »

  • July 7, 2015
  • 11:16 AM
  • 15 views

Brain Deficits in Visual Hallucinations

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

One the early things I was taught in my neuroscience training was that new-onset visual hallucinations need to be assessed for medical or "organic causes".Auditory hallucinations were felt to be more characteristic of schizophrenia.One medical disorder linked to visual hallucinations is dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). DLB is second to Alzheimer's disease in producing neurodegenerative dementia. Visual hallucinations is a hallmark of DLB and is found in up to 70% of clinical samples with th........ Read more »

Heitz C, Noblet V, Cretin B, Philippi N, Kremer L, Stackfleth M, Hubele F, Armspach JP, Namer I, & Blanc F. (2015) Neural correlates of visual hallucinations in dementia with Lewy bodies. Alzheimer's research , 7(1), 6. PMID: 25717349  

  • July 7, 2015
  • 06:02 AM
  • 25 views

5 Ways To Connect Science And Spirituality

by Pieter Carriere in United Academics

To assess the value of spirituality, this article aims to give a clear, imaginable and humble impression of spirituality research. It describes research of spiritual practices, which are practiced by people of multiple religious affiliations and even by irreligious people.... Read more »

Gothe N, Pontifex MB, Hillman C, & McAuley E. (2013) The acute effects of yoga on executive function. Journal of physical activity , 10(4), 488-95. PMID: 22820158  

Vickhoff, B., Malmgren, H., Åström, R., Nyberg, G., Ekström, S., Engwall, M., Snygg, J., Nilsson, M., & Jörnsten, R. (2013) Music structure determines heart rate variability of singers. Frontiers in Psychology. DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00334  

Friese M, Schweizer L, Arnoux A, Sutter F, & Wänke M. (2014) Personal prayer counteracts self-control depletion. Consciousness and cognition, 90-5. PMID: 25277947  

  • July 7, 2015
  • 05:25 AM
  • 19 views

Sick leave and income levels for parents of children with autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Parents of children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] living in Stockholm, Sweden in 2006 were more likely to be on sick leave, not in the labor force, or earning low income when compared to parents who did not have a child with ASD and these results remained after adjusting for familial socioeconomic factors and parental psychiatric care."That was the rather grim conclusion reached by Miranda McEvilly and colleagues [1] (open-access) following their analysis of families taking........ Read more »

  • July 6, 2015
  • 02:45 PM
  • 29 views

Link between autoimmune diseases, medications, and a dangerous heart condition

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Mohamed Boutjdir, PhD, professor of medicine, cell biology, and physiology and pharmacology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has led a study with international collaborators identifying the mechanism by which patients with various autoimmune and connective tissue disorders may be at risk for life-threatening cardiac events if they take certain anti-histamine or anti-depressant medications. Dr. Boutjdir is also director of the Cardiac Research Program at VA New York Harbor Healthcare System.... Read more »

Yue, Y., Castrichini, M., Srivastava, U., Fabris, F., Shah, K., Li, Z., Qu, Y., El-Sherif, N., Zhou, Z., January, C.... (2015) Pathogenesis of the Novel Autoimmune-Associated Long QT Syndrome. Circulation. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.009800  

  • July 6, 2015
  • 02:22 PM
  • 36 views

Restraint and confinement still an everyday practice in mental health settings

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Providers of mental-health services still rely on intervention techniques such as physical restraint and confinement to control some psychiatric hospital patients, a practice which can cause harm to both patients and care facilities, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. The study found that almost one in four psychiatric patients in Ontario hospitals are restrained using control interventions, such as chairs that prevent rising, wrist restraints, seclusion rooms or acute con........ Read more »

Mah, T., Hirdes, J., Heckman, G., & Stolee, P. (2015) Use of control interventions in adult in-patient mental health services. Healthcare Management Forum, 28(4), 139-145. DOI: 10.1177/0840470415581230  

  • July 6, 2015
  • 04:54 AM
  • 45 views

Is coeliac disease an aetiological factor in paediatric nonsyndromic intellectual disability?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

In answer to the question posed in the title of this post on whether coeliac disease (CD) might show some connection to intellectual (learning) disability, 'probably not' is the finding reported by Taner Sezer and colleagues [1].Researchers initially looked at "serum levels of tissue transglutaminase antibody and total IgA" in over 230 children diagnosed with nonsyndromic intellectual disability compared with about the same number of asymptomatic controls. Nonsyndromic intellectual dis........ Read more »

  • July 6, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 44 views

Structural Brain Changes Associated to Concussion History and Cognition

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Prior concussion that resulted in loss of consciousness is a risk factor for decreased hippocampal regions and mild cognitive impairment later in life.... Read more »

  • July 5, 2015
  • 01:50 PM
  • 44 views

Discovery points to a new path toward a universal flu vaccine

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Flu vaccines can be something of a shot in the dark. Not only must they be given yearly, there’s no guarantee the strains against which they protect will be the ones circulating once the season arrives. New research by Rockefeller University scientists suggests it may be possible to harness a previously unknown mechanism within the immune system to create more effective and efficient vaccines against this ever-mutating virus.... Read more »

Wang, T., Maamary, J., Tan, G., Bournazos, S., Davis, C., Krammer, F., Schlesinger, S., Palese, P., Ahmed, R., & Ravetch, J. (2015) Anti-HA Glycoforms Drive B Cell Affinity Selection and Determine Influenza Vaccine Efficacy. Cell, 162(1), 160-169. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.06.026  

  • July 4, 2015
  • 02:50 PM
  • 57 views

Evidence of Value of Orphan Drugs Inconsistent

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Igho Onakpoya MD MSc Clarendon Scholar University of Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences Oxford UK MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Onakpoya: Several … Continue reading →
The post Evidence of Value of Orphan Drugs Inconsistent appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Igho Onakpoya MD MSc, & Clarendon Scholar. (2015) Evidence of Value of Orphan Drugs Inconsistent. medicalresearch.com. info:/

  • July 4, 2015
  • 02:26 PM
  • 65 views

Long-term memories are maintained by prion-like proteins

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Research from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) has uncovered further evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time. And paradoxically, it works in the same way as mechanisms that cause mad cow disease, kuru, and other degenerative brain diseases.... Read more »

Fioriti, L., Myers, C., Huang, Y., Li, X., Stephan, J., Trifilieff, P., Colnaghi, L., Kosmidis, S., Drisaldi, B., Pavlopoulos, E.... (2015) The Persistence of Hippocampal-Based Memory Requires Protein Synthesis Mediated by the Prion-like Protein CPEB3. Neuron, 86(6), 1433-1448. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.05.021  

Drisaldi, B., Colnaghi, L., Fioriti, L., Rao, N., Myers, C., Snyder, A., Metzger, D., Tarasoff, J., Konstantinov, E., Fraser, P.... (2015) SUMOylation Is an Inhibitory Constraint that Regulates the Prion-like Aggregation and Activity of CPEB3. Cell Reports, 11(11), 1694-1702. DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.04.061  

Stephan, J., Fioriti, L., Lamba, N., Colnaghi, L., Karl, K., Derkatch, I., & Kandel, E. (2015) The CPEB3 Protein Is a Functional Prion that Interacts with the Actin Cytoskeleton. Cell Reports, 11(11), 1772-1785. DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.04.060  

  • July 4, 2015
  • 05:19 AM
  • 63 views

A viral 'cause' of obesity?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I must thank Leah Hardy (@LeahFHardy) for bringing to my attention the paper by Qinglong Shang and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) reporting that: "Ad36 [Human adenovirus 36] infection is associated with an increased risk of obesity development."Based on a meta-analysis of the available research literature examining whether Ad-36 - "a nonenveloped icosahedral virus comprised of double-stranded DNA and is one of 56 serotypes in 7 subgroups of human adenoviruses" - might........ Read more »

  • July 3, 2015
  • 04:37 PM
  • 85 views

REM sleep critical for young brain development; medication interferes

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Rapid eye movement or REM sleep actively converts waking experiences into lasting memories and abilities in young brains reports a new study. The finding broadens the understanding of children’s sleep needs and calls into question the increasing use of REM-disrupting medications such as stimulants and antidepressants.

... Read more »

Michelle C. Dumoulin Bridi, Sara J. Aton, Julie Seibt, Leslie Renouard, Tammi Coleman1, & Marcos G. Frank. (2015) Rapid eye movement sleep promotes cortical plasticity in the developing brain. Science Advances. info:/10.1126/sciadv.1500105

  • July 3, 2015
  • 04:05 PM
  • 69 views

Novel DNA repair mechanism brings new horizons

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The DNA molecule is chemically unstable giving rise to DNA lesions of different nature. That is why DNA damage detection, signaling and repair, collectively known as the DNA damage response, are needed. A group of researchers discovered a new mechanism of DNA repair, which opens up new perspectives for the treatment and prevention of neurodegenerative diseases.... Read more »

Nikolay A. Pestov, Nadezhda S. Gerasimova, Olga I. Kulaeva, & Vasily M. Studitsky. (2015) Structure of transcribed chromatin is a sensor of DNA damage. Science Advances. info:/10.1126/sciadv.1500021

  • July 3, 2015
  • 11:45 AM
  • 44 views

Warming Climate May Not Reduce Winter Mortality

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Patrick L Kinney Ph.D. Professor of Environmental Health Sciences and Director, Columbia Climate and Health Program Mailman School of Public Health Columbia University, New York, NY Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Kinney: … Continue reading →
The post Warming Climate May Not Reduce Winter Mortality appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Prof. Patrick L Kinney Ph.D., & Professor of Environmental Health Sciences. (2015) Warming Climate May Not Reduce Winter Mortality. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 3, 2015
  • 09:13 AM
  • 49 views

Diabetes Medication Reduced Weight and Improved Metabolic Parameters in Obese Patients

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. F. Xavier Pi–Sunyer MD Division of Endocrinology and Obesity Research Center Columbia University, New York Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Pi-Sunye: In a large randomized trial, … Continue reading →
The post Diabetes Medication Reduced Weight and Improved Metabolic Parameters in Obese Patients appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Dr. F. Xavier Pi-Sunyer MD, & Division of Endocrinology and Obesity Research Center. (2015) Diabetes Medication Reduced Weight and Improved Metabolic Parameters in Obese Patients. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 3, 2015
  • 08:54 AM
  • 40 views

Low Testosterone Linked To Obesity and Depression In Men

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Michael S. Irwig MD Division of Endocrinology Medical Faculty Associates George Washington University Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Many factors are associated with lower testosterone levels and … Continue reading →
The post Low Testosterone Linked To Obesity and Depression In Men appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Michael S. Irwig MD Division of Endocrinology Medical Faculty Associates. (2015) Low Testosterone Linked To Obesity and Depression In Men. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 3, 2015
  • 06:06 AM
  • 71 views

A new tissue-specific FLCN-deficient mouse model of renal tumourigenesis

by Danielle Stevenson in BHD Research Blog

Animal models can be useful for understanding disease pathology and as preclinical models for drug testing. As BHD patients develop renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) of varied histologies, associated with a loss of FLCN, BHD animal models could be used to study of a wide range of renal cancer subtypes. Current BHD mouse models include kidney-specific Flcn-knockouts (Chen et al., 2008, Baba et al., 2008) and ubiquitous knockouts (Hasumi et al., 2009, Hartman et al., 2009, Hudon et al., 2010). The form........ Read more »

Chen J, Huang D, Rubera I, Futami K, Wang P, Zickert P, Khoo SK, Dykema K, Zhao P, Petillo D.... (2015) Disruption of tubular Flcn expression as a mouse model for renal tumor induction. Kidney international. PMID: 26083655  

  • July 3, 2015
  • 06:02 AM
  • 102 views

5 Tips For Better Sleep

by Elisabeth Buhl Thubron in United Academics

Adding some ‘worry time’ to your day could work better than pills.... Read more »

  • July 3, 2015
  • 04:56 AM
  • 58 views

Vitamin D metabolic gene variants and risk for autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I was really rather happy to see the "preliminary evidence" reported by Rebecca Schmidt and colleagues [1] when it came to examining whether selected vitamin D metabolic gene variants might show linkage to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) based on data derived from the CHARGE initiative.For quite a while now I've discussed the various peer-reviewed science on the topic of vitamin D deficiency / insufficiency with autism in mind on this blog (see here and see here for example). Specifically, h........ Read more »

Schmidt RJ, Hansen RL, Hartiala J, Allayee H, Sconberg JL, Schmidt LC, Volk HE, & Tassone F. (2015) Selected vitamin D metabolic gene variants and risk for autism spectrum disorder in the CHARGE Study. Early human development, 91(8), 483-489. PMID: 26073892  

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