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  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:32 PM
  • 1,256 views

Passive Electroreception in Dolphins

by Jim Ryan in Wild Mammals

Sharks and other aquatic vertebrates are known to use passive electroreception to detect other organisms in the vicinity. Passive electroreception is the ability of an animal to detect the weak electric field given off by another animal in the vicinity. However, mammals rely primarily on visual, olfactory, touch, and auditory information to perceive their world. Among mammals, only the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and echidnas (Tachyglossus aculeatus) uses passive electroreception t........ Read more »

Czech-Damal, N., Liebschner, A., Miersch, L., Klauer, G., Hanke, F., Marshall, C., Dehnhardt, G., & Hanke, W. (2011) Electroreception in the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis). Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 279(1729), 663-668. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2011.1127  

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:32 PM
  • 732 views

Military Sonar Alters Whale Behavior

by Jim Ryan in Wild Mammals

Some blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) off the coast of California change their behavior when exposed to the sort of underwater sounds used during U.S. military exercises. The whales may alter diving behavior or temporarily avoid important feeding areas, according to new research by the Southern California Behavioral Response Study.


Researchers exposed tagged blue whales in the California Bight to simulated mid-frequency (3.5-4 kHz) sonar sounds significantly less intense than the militar........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,383 views

Darwin's contributions and why this matters for Mexico's conifers

by Claire Williams in Conifer Reproductive Biology

For International Darwin Day, February 12. Darwin's birthday inspired an elegant treatise by UNAM professor Antonio Lazcano, published in Science back in 2005. His article traces the cultural, social and science history roots behind widespread acceptance of Darwin's ideas in Mexico. This careful analysis is worthwhile reading, particularly for those working in the USA.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,022 views

Dance Macabre: Will 14th Century Remains Reveal the Pandemic Secrets of the Black Death?

by Sara Klink in Promega Connections

Another group of researchers decided to further analyze the causative agent of the Black Plague by enriching for and sequencing one of the extrachromasomal plasmids present in the bacterial genome: the 9.6kb virulence-associated pPCP1 plasmid.

The recently published research in the Proceedings of the National Association of Science USA chose to use samples from East Smithfield (ES) cemetery in London, England, a burial ground that was established during the medieval Black Death pandemic of 13........ Read more »

Schuenemann VJ, Bos K, Dewitte S, Schmedes S, Jamieson J, Mittnik A, Forrest S, Coombes BK, Wood JW, Earn DJ.... (2011) From the Cover: Targeted enrichment of ancient pathogens yielding the pPCP1 plasmid of Yersinia pestis from victims of the Black Death. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108(38). PMID: 21876176  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,687 views

Simpler LCP-based crystallization

by Peter Nollert in Protein Crystallization Blog

For all those that are interested in simplifying membrane protein crystallization trials, you may want to check out this paper on the topic of 'simplifying LCP-based crystallization':

Wallace E, Dranow D, Laible PD, Christensen J, & Nollert P (2011). Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization. PloS one, 6 (8) PMID: 21909395... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,790 views

Communication as a network problem

by Becky in It Takes 30

I recently gave a short talk to a group of post-docs who had organized their own mini-symposium and workshop as a way of bringing the Harvard post-doc community in systems biology together. Those of you who haven’t worked in the Boston area may be surprised that we need special events to bring together a community that is separated by only ~4 miles, but in fact the trip from Harvard’s main campus in Cambridge to Harvard Medical School in Boston is a frustrating and lengthy one. Mu........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,211 views

xxx

by xxx in Anole Annals

xxx... Read more »

Kirsten E. Nicholson and Paul M. Richards. (2011) Home-range size and overlap within an introduced population of the Cuban Knight Anole, Anolis equestris (Squamata: Iguanidae). Phyllomedusa, 10(1), 65-73. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,309 views

Mapping future climate space

by brettcherry in Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog

By mapping climate suitability for plant species researchers are able to understand how climate change can affect biodiversity or determine suitable climates in the future for different plants. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,276 views

Methylomes in Lethal Prostate Cancer Support Personalized Medicine

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Description of new Science Translational Medicine pub out of Johns Hopkins. Epigenetic profiling of metastatic prostate cancer reveals that epigenetic biomarkers are worth the search.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,395 views

Methylomes in Lethal Prostate Cancer Support Personalized Medicine

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Recent surprising evidence has shown that metastatic tumors usually do not vary in their genomes within an individual. Yet, these tumors behave differently at different sites around the body. Does that mean that epigenetic profiling will be too variable to target for cancer treatment? In a word, no.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,792 views

Vaccines: Myths and Realities

by Anton Power in BioMed Weekly

Summary of common myths and why they are wrong.... Read more »

De Wals P, Deceuninck G, Toth E, Boulianne N, Brunet D, Boucher RM, Landry M, & De Serres G. (2012) Risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome following H1N1 influenza vaccination in Quebec. JAMA : the Journal of the American Medical Association, 308(2), 175-81. PMID: 22782419  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,907 views

How to get max protein from E.coli

by Dave Dilyx in Protein Solubility Blog

Bacterium E. coli is the working horse of protein expression, and a rare biotechnologist knows about it more than the basic stuff like "grow at 37°C". This approach is fine if you don't have any problems expressing your protein, but if the target protein aggregates irreversibly in certain conditions or you have to rapidly screen for solubility conditions, you are left with an insolvable puzzle. Bacterial physiology may be not cool anymore, but knowing just a little more about ........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,244 views

Not all E.coli strains are created equal

by Dave Dilyx in Protein Solubility Blog

BL21 (DE3) strain of E.coli and its derivatives have the ability to support expression from the strong T7 promoter, traditionally used for expression vectors. However, transcription from this promoter is “leaky”, e.g. there is some level of expression even in the absence of induction. If the protein is toxic - and if you have protein aggregation this is often the case - this creates selective pressure to get rid of the protein by accumulating mutations in the vector. That’s ........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,032 views

Bubbles and Bite: Why Fizzy Drinks Taste So Good

by Dyani Lewis in United Academics

Why do we choose to drink the beverages that we do? When we reach for a cup of coffee, perhaps it’s the caffeine we’re after; in a glass of wine, the social lubricating effects of alcohol may have lured us. But for carbonated drinks, the subtle zing of effervescence often combined with sugary sweetness, creates a sensory delight that can be irresistible.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,264 views

Medicine goes under the Needle

by James Dunce in Antisense Science

Tattoo artists may soon be faced with the prospect of a career change into the world of medicine thanks to the revelation that tattooing technology can be effectively applied in the delivery of vaccines and anti-parasitic drugs to the upper layers of the dermis.... Read more »

Shio MT, Paquet M, Martel C, Bosschaerts T, Stienstra S, Olivier M, & Fortin A. (2014) Drug delivery by tattooing to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis. Scientific reports, 4156. PMID: 24561704  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 788 views

Identified a new possible target to combat muscle wasting

by IRBBarcelona in the Node

A study by scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB), headed by Antonio Zorzano, also full professor of the University of Barcelona, reveals a potential therapeutic target to tackle muscle wasting in risk populations.... Read more »

Sala D, Ivanova S, Plana N, Ribas V, Duran J, Bach D, Turkseven S, Laville M, Vidal H, Karczewska-Kupczewska M.... (2014) Autophagy-regulating TP53INP2 mediates muscle wasting and is repressed in diabetes. The Journal of clinical investigation. PMID: 24713655  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,736 views

Electron-spin clue to solving general anesthesia mystery

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

New study on fruit flies suggests general anesthetics can affect electron-spin properties... Read more »

Turin Luca, Skoulakis Efthimios, & Horsfield Andrew. (2014) Electron spin changes during general anesthesia in Drosophila. PNAS, Early edition(N/A). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404387111  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,033 views

Recent reports on BHD and skin symptoms – misdiagnosis and new manifestations

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome usually develop benign hair follicle tumours (BHFTs) which appear as multiple whitish papules developing primarily on the face, neck and torso (Menko et al., 2009). BHFTs such as fibrofolliculomas and trichodiscomas (skin-coloured tumours occurring on the upper body) can be associated with various genetic conditions and their histology is often key to differential diagnosis. The morphology and histology of various BHFTs is discussed in a recent ........ Read more »

Del Rosso JQ, Silverberg N, & Zeichner JA. (2016) When Acne is Not Acne. Dermatologic clinics, 34(2), 225-8. PMID: 27015783  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 944 views

PD-L1 expression associates with non-inactivated VHL ccRCC

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

The loss of the of the tumor suppressor gene VHL and the subsequent deregulation of VHL/HIF/VEGF signalling are known to play a role in development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Renal tumours associated with BHD syndrome are histologically diverse and include a percentage of ccRCC (Pavlovich et al., 2002). Anti-angiogenic therapies targeting the VHL/HIF/VEGF pathway have emerged in past years (Rini et al., 2006) but the development of resistance to these therapeutic agents is leadi........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 28 views

DHM attenuates obesity-induced slow-twitch-fiber decrease via FLCN/FNIP1/AMPK pathway

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Obesity is often associated with decreases in the proportion of skeletal muscle slow-twitch fibers and insulin sensitivity. Slow-twitch fibers are rich in mitochondria and utilize fatty acid oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. In their new study, Zhou et al. (2017) explore the role of the FLCN/FNIP1/AMPK signalling pathway in obesity-induced reductions in slow-twitch fibers and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle using high-fat-diet-induced (HFD) obese mice, ob/ob mutant mice, an........ Read more »

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