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  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,314 views

Darwin's contributions and why this matters for Mexico's conifers

by Claire Williams in Conifer Reproductive Biology

For International Darwin Day, February 12. Darwin's birthday inspired an elegant treatise by UNAM professor Antonio Lazcano, published in Science back in 2005. His article traces the cultural, social and science history roots behind widespread acceptance of Darwin's ideas in Mexico. This careful analysis is worthwhile reading, particularly for those working in the USA.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,956 views

Dance Macabre: Will 14th Century Remains Reveal the Pandemic Secrets of the Black Death?

by Sara Klink in Promega Connections

Another group of researchers decided to further analyze the causative agent of the Black Plague by enriching for and sequencing one of the extrachromasomal plasmids present in the bacterial genome: the 9.6kb virulence-associated pPCP1 plasmid.

The recently published research in the Proceedings of the National Association of Science USA chose to use samples from East Smithfield (ES) cemetery in London, England, a burial ground that was established during the medieval Black Death pandemic of 13........ Read more »

Schuenemann VJ, Bos K, Dewitte S, Schmedes S, Jamieson J, Mittnik A, Forrest S, Coombes BK, Wood JW, Earn DJ.... (2011) From the Cover: Targeted enrichment of ancient pathogens yielding the pPCP1 plasmid of Yersinia pestis from victims of the Black Death. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108(38). PMID: 21876176  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,349 views

Bisexuality is natural for women

by United Academics in United Academics

Researchers at the Boise State University have found that most women are bisexual by nature. Also, they discovered that these bisexual feelings increase with age. During this study, 484 heterosexual women were surveyed. 60 percent of them said to be sexually attracted to other women, 45 percent had already kissed with a woman en about half of the participants had fantasized about it.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,641 views

Simpler LCP-based crystallization

by Peter Nollert in Protein Crystallization Blog

For all those that are interested in simplifying membrane protein crystallization trials, you may want to check out this paper on the topic of 'simplifying LCP-based crystallization':

Wallace E, Dranow D, Laible PD, Christensen J, & Nollert P (2011). Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization. PloS one, 6 (8) PMID: 21909395... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,170 views

The Fragile Monument of Hominin Diet

by Matt Sponheimer in Originus

Hominin Diet... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,330 views

Evolution of "Natural" Sleep

by Cris Campbell in Originus

If you slept well last night and do so regularly, chances are you don’t give sleep much thought. It happens, is pleasurable, and you are refreshed. If you didn’t sleep well last night and do so irregularly, chances are you have given sleep a great deal of thought. It doesn’t happen, isn’t pleasurable, and you are fatigued.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,083 views

“Survival of the funkiest”, or how to evolve a hit song?

by Michael Czaplinski in Inside the Black Box

Evolving "loops", which are short musical pieces become more attractive under selective pressure from listeners. Some interesting phenomena occur!... Read more »

Robert M. MacCallum, Matthias Mauch, Austin Burt, & Armand M. Leroi. (2012) Evolution of Music by Public Choice. PNAS. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1203182109  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 3,921 views

Lions And Tigers And Ligers, Oh My!

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Geographic isolation is often involved in speciation events. Here are examples of hybrid speciation involving a very localized isolation and a mating choice behavior.... Read more »

Jesús Mavárez1, Camilo A. Salazar, Eldredge Bermingham1, Christian Salcedo, Chris D. Jiggins . (2006) Speciation by hybridization in Heliconius butterflies. Nature, 868-871. DOI: 10.1038/nature04738  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,365 views

Making sense of a small worm from big data

by Michael Hsieh in Hsieh Lab Blog

We recently published a gene expression microarray-based paper in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. As a "reductionist", it was challenging for me to deal with the massive amount of data associated with the paper. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,975 views

Nature is saving a huge amount of our Money

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

A large number of people in this world don’t know that they have a very huge amount of servants working for them on the planet Earth and beyond this planet at no cost while giving them infinite benefits. Those workers are present everywhere, we know some of them and we don’t know many of them.



Economic value of some bodily functions:

You can’t see your stomach but there are many bacteria working for you without any cost. They are serving you in give and take relations........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,322 views

New Year Resolution, Reflection on Cancer Research

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Controversial and surprising cancer research news, point to importance of epigenetics and cell signalling research in the war on cancer.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,152 views

New Years Resolution, Reflection on Cancer Research

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Recent news in cancer research points to the importance of epigenetics and cell signalling in producing complex combinational cures.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,074 views

Five things to think about when preparing glycoproteins for crystallization:

by Dave Dilyx in Protein Solubility Blog

So, you have decided to crystallize your glycoprotein. First for the bad news, protein crystallization is difficult; it is not called the bottleneck of crystallography for nothing. When you want to crystallize a glycoprotein your problems are compounded because glycosylation is usually heterogeneous and can interfere with crystallization. However, there is good news, crystallographers believe that all proteins can be crystallized; it is just a matter of hard work and determination. A major prob........ Read more »

Chang, V., Crispin, M., Aricescu, A., Harvey, D., Nettleship, J., Fennelly, J., Yu, C., Boles, K., Evans, E., Stuart, D.... (2007) Glycoprotein Structural Genomics: Solving the Glycosylation Problem. Structure, 15(3), 267-273. DOI: 10.1016/j.str.2007.01.011  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,851 views

How to get max protein from E.coli

by Dave Dilyx in Protein Solubility Blog

Bacterium E. coli is the working horse of protein expression, and a rare biotechnologist knows about it more than the basic stuff like "grow at 37°C". This approach is fine if you don't have any problems expressing your protein, but if the target protein aggregates irreversibly in certain conditions or you have to rapidly screen for solubility conditions, you are left with an insolvable puzzle. Bacterial physiology may be not cool anymore, but knowing just a little more about ........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,833 views

To Bee Or Not To Bee: How Bees Avoid Difficult Choices

by Jalees Rehman in Fragments of Truth

Humans who are faced with difficult choices are often tempted to simply opt out of making a choice, especially when they realize that they cannot easily resolve their uncertainty as to which choice is the better choice. Some researchers consider this ability to opt out as an indicator of “meta-cognition”, a term used to describe “thinking about thinking”. Instead of plowing ahead with a random choice, humans can recognize that they lack adequate information and choose not........ Read more »

Clint J. Perry, & Andrew B. Barron. (2013) Honey bees selectively avoid difficult choices. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1314571110  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,236 views

Medicine goes under the Needle

by James Dunce in Antisense Science

Tattoo artists may soon be faced with the prospect of a career change into the world of medicine thanks to the revelation that tattooing technology can be effectively applied in the delivery of vaccines and anti-parasitic drugs to the upper layers of the dermis.... Read more »

Shio MT, Paquet M, Martel C, Bosschaerts T, Stienstra S, Olivier M, & Fortin A. (2014) Drug delivery by tattooing to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis. Scientific reports, 4156. PMID: 24561704  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,437 views

At the origin of the aphid-ant mutualism

by Mauro Mandrioli in The aphid room

Several hemipteran species are involved in mutualistic relationships with ants so that aphids produce honeydew, a sweet waste product enriched in sugar and aminoacids, that ants collect as a supply for their diet. In return...... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,708 views

How sex-engineered prawns can be used to fight deadly parasite

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

Scientists float the idea of introducing male-only prawn stocks to Senegal river to control spread of snails which act as vector for blood flukes... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 788 views

The geometry of consciousness is a multi-dimensional math trip

by amanda alvarez in It Ain't Magic

Amanda Alvarez writes about how neuroscientists are studying consciousness with mathematics.... Read more »

Oizumi M, Tsuchiya N, & Amari SI. (2016) Unified framework for information integration based on information geometry. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(51), 14817-14822. PMID: 27930289  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,019 views

Robotic researcher to the rescue

by kylius wilkins in It Ain't Magic

Masaki Watabe talks about automated robotic researchers, future robot rule, and scientific philosophy.... Read more »

Watabe, M., Arjunan, S., Fukushima, S., Iwamoto, K., Kozuka, J., Matsuoka, S., Shindo, Y., Ueda, M., & Takahashi, K. (2015) A Computational Framework for Bioimaging Simulation. PLOS ONE, 10(7). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0130089  

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