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  • May 5, 2011
  • 12:15 AM
  • 2,261 views

Swarms of tasty cicadas don’t help the birds — what gives?

by Hannah Waters in Culturing Science – biology as relevant to us earthly beings

Every thirteen years they come. After over a decade underground, they build burrows to the earth’s surface and emerge in synchrony, clawing and crawling up through the soil, rip their skins down the back and are reborn as adults. And after a month, they will be dead, whether consumed by the animals awaiting their arrival [...]... Read more »

Koenig, W., & Liebhold, A. (2003) Regional impacts of periodical cicadas on oak radial increment. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 33(6), 1084-1089. DOI: 10.1139/X03-037  

Lehmann-Ziebarth, N., Heideman, P., Shapiro, R., Stoddart, S., Hsiao, C., Stephenson, G., Milewski, P., & Ives, A. (2005) EVOLUTION OF PERIODICITY IN PERIODICAL CICADAS. Ecology, 86(12), 3200-3211. DOI: 10.1890/04-1615  

  • May 4, 2011
  • 11:26 AM
  • 1,141 views

Ila Singh finds no XMRV in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

Since the first association of the retrovirus XMRV with chronic fatigue syndrome in 2009 in the US, subsequent studies have failed to detect evidence of infection in patients from the US, Europe, and China. These studies were potentially compromised by a number of factors, such as differences in patient characterization, geographic locations, clinical samples used, [...]... Read more »

Clifford H. Shin, Lucinda Bateman, Robert Schlaberg, Ashley M. Bunker, Christopher J. Leonard, Ronald W. Hughen, Alan R. Light, Kathleen C. Light, & Ila R. Singh1*. (2011) Absence of XMRV and other MLV-related viruses in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of Virology. info:/10.1128/JVI.00693-11

  • May 4, 2011
  • 09:03 AM
  • 1,343 views

Forests at your service: lessons from Kibale

by Jeremy in Agricultural Biodiversity Weblog

We are submitting this post to the ‘Forests: Nature at Your Service’ blogging competition being run by UNEP and Treehugger in celebration of World Environment Day. Wish us luck. It must have seemed a no-brainer. Uganda’s Kibale National Park (KNP) is scenic, diverse, important for the largest bit of mid-elevation tropical rainforest remaining in East [...]... Read more »

  • May 4, 2011
  • 01:35 AM
  • 1,927 views

Osama bin Laden, sasquatch and human biogeography

by Julien Riel-Salvatore in A Very Remote Period Indeed

Science has a post on their website about a little study (Gillespie et al. 2009) that came out a couple of years ago that applied some key biogeographical principles to provide a prediction of where Osama bin Laden might have been hiding. The paper was discussed in Scientific American when if first came out, but now has received a ton of attention because the authors' predicted hiding place for ... Read more »

  • May 3, 2011
  • 11:07 PM
  • 1,344 views

Electrochemotherapy May Be Hindered by pH Fronts

by Michael Long in Phased

Model studies in agar gels suggest that the pH gradient is substantial, and may hinder treatment.... Read more »

Turjanski, P., Olaiz, N., Maglietti, F., Michinski, S., Suárez, C., Molina, F. V., & Marshall, G. (2011) The Role of pH Fronts in Reversible Electroporation. PLoS ONE, 6(4). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0017303  

  • May 3, 2011
  • 07:00 PM
  • 2,140 views

Not a Wolf, But a Tiger

by Laelaps in Laelaps

Evolution and extinction are inextricably linked together. An understanding of one is incomplete without a comprehension of the other, and no animal embodies these complementary concepts better than Thylacinus cynocephalus.
Thylacinus goes by a few different names – the marsupial wolf, the Tasmanian tiger, or, simply, the thylacine. Whatever you choose to call the species, though, [...]... Read more »

Figueirido, B., and Janis, C. (2011) The Predatory behavior of the Thylacine: Tasmanian tiger or marsupial wolf? . Biology Letters. info:/10.1098/rsbl.2011.0364

  • May 3, 2011
  • 06:02 PM
  • 1,418 views

The monster sheep that wasn't, and other tales of African Bovini

by Darren Naish in Tetrapod Zoology





If you're a regular reader you'll have seen the recent article on those African 'great bubalus' depictions and on how they might (or might not) be representations of the large, long-horned bovin bovid Syncerus antiquus. As discussed in that article, S. antiquus - long thought to be a species of Pelorovis - is now regarded as a very close relative of S. caffer, the living Cape buffalo. As usual though, there are quite a few additional things that I wanted to cover, so here's an attempt to ti........ Read more »

Gentry, A. W. (1967) Pelorovis oldowayensis Reck, an extinct bovid from East Africa. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History), Geology, 245-299. info:/

  • May 3, 2011
  • 03:47 PM
  • 1,298 views

Your brain, a fortress against infection

by Connor Bamford in The Rule of 6ix


As genetic parasites, viruses use the cells within our tissues, organs and bodies to replicate. And for the most of it our cells do not like it. The more a virus replicates within a host, the more chance it will have to spread among the population yet a viral infection within a cell may set up a devastating chain of events leading to its ultimate demise.  


A human brain. http://www.tehrantimes.com
For example, the virus can disrupt the structure of the inside of the........ Read more »

Griffin, D. (2011) Viral Encephalomyelitis. PLoS Pathogens, 7(3). DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1002004  

McGavern, D., & Kang, S. (2011) Illuminating viral infections in the nervous system. Nature Reviews Immunology, 11(5), 318-329. DOI: 10.1038/nri2971  

  • May 3, 2011
  • 01:00 PM
  • 2,667 views

Why Listen to the Local Guy?

by Bluegrass Blue Crab in Southern Fried Science

policymaking during comanagement in Mongolia, rcinet.ca Two of Ostrom’s (1990) institutional design principles emphasize the role of the local –rules must be adapted to local conditions and resource users must participate in the rulemaking process. These principles were determined empirically through cross-site analysis, but a large body of research from science studies [...]... Read more »

  • May 3, 2011
  • 12:00 PM
  • 2,621 views

An After Thought to Evolution: Exceptional ways of Controlling Gene “Expression”

by Linda in the Node

Unusual control of miR166/65 expression by AGO10 is required for meristem development in Arabidopsis... Read more »

  • May 3, 2011
  • 09:32 AM
  • 1,083 views

Total calorie intake is most influential in regulating adiponectin

by EcoPhysioMichelle in C6-H12-O6

Today I have a guest post over at the LabSpaces guest blog Dangerous Experiments. In that post I discuss a recent paper that examines the relative influence of total caloric intake, relative amount of dietary fat, and existing body fat on the circulating levels of an endocrine called adiponectin. Adiponectin is involved in energy homeostasis, specifically glucose uptake and the breakdown of fat, among other things. Hypoadiponectinemia (having too little adiponectin) is a risk factor for a lot of........ Read more »

Liping Qiao, Bonggi Lee, Brice Kinney, Hyung sun Yoo, and Jianhua Shao. (2011) Energy intake and adiponectin gene expression. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. info:/10.​1152/​ajpendo.​00004.​2011

  • May 3, 2011
  • 09:30 AM
  • 1,402 views

Total calorie intake is most influential in regulating adiponectin

by EcoPhysioMichelle in C6-H12-O6 (old)

Today I have a guest post over at the LabSpaces guest blog Dangerous Experiments. In that post I discuss a recent paper that examines the relative influence of total caloric intake, relative amount of dietary fat, and existing body fat on the circulating levels of an endocrine called adiponectin. Adiponectin is involved in energy homeostasis, specifically glucose uptake and the breakdown of fat, among other things. Hypoadiponectinemia (having too little adiponectin) is a risk factor for a lot of........ Read more »

Liping Qiao, Bonggi Lee, Brice Kinney, Hyung sun Yoo, and Jianhua Shao. (2011) Energy intake and adiponectin gene expression. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. info:/10.​1152/​ajpendo.​00004.​2011

  • May 3, 2011
  • 09:05 AM
  • 2,328 views

Released from predators, guppies reshape themselves—and their environment

by Jeremy Yoder in Denim and Tweed

.flickr-photo { }.flickr-framewide { float: right; text-align: left; margin-left: 15px; margin-bottom: 15px; width:100%;}.flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } A (domestic) male guppy. Photo by gartenfreuden.Consider a population of guppies living in the Aripo River in Trinidad. They have a happy existence, as far as guppies can be happy, but their lives are shaped by the constant threat of larger, predatory fish. The river runs clear over a colorful gravel bed, and guppies who s........ Read more »

  • May 3, 2011
  • 08:17 AM
  • 1,748 views

Making a difference to the lives of cancer patients: An interview with Dr Charles Sawyers

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

Advanced prostate cancer has been quite a hot topic lately, with several new and relatively late stage compounds in the pipeline garnering attention from promising data. One of those agents, abiraterone acetate (Zytiga) only just received FDA approval on Friday … Continue reading →
... Read more »

  • May 3, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,443 views

Tuesday Crustie: Know that I glory in this nose of mine

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

I was pleased that people liked last week’s description of a new squat lobster and its whimsical name, Uroptychus pinocchio. Today, let me introduce its cousin, another  species new to science with an equally choice nom de science:


Like its relatives, Uroptychus naso and Uroptychus pinocchio, this new species lives in the western Pacific. These three are distributed from Japan in the north down to Australia in the south. Something interesting happens as you travel along this way on the ........ Read more »

Poore GCB, & Andreakis N. (2011) Morphological, molecular and biogeographic evidence support two new species in the Uroptychus naso complex (Crustacea: Decapoda: Chirostylidae) . Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. info:/10.1016/j.ympev.2011.03.032

  • May 2, 2011
  • 03:38 PM
  • 1,512 views

What would you do about an old bridge?

by Jon Wilkins in Lost in Transcription

So, what would you do if faced with an old-style concrete bridge that does not really have the strength that it should?

One solution has been proposed in a PhD dissertation by Gun Up Kwon of the University of Texas. Of course, this post is only marginally about that, but there you go.

These full-size episodes tend to come out poorly on the blog, so if you want to be able to read it more easily, I recommend heading over to Darwin Eats Cake.

Enjoy.


Best URL for sharing: http://www.darwineatsc........ Read more »

Gun Up Kwon. (2008) Strengthening existing steel bridge girders by the use of post-installed shear connectors. PhD Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin. info:other/http://gradworks.umi.com/33/41/3341639.html

  • May 2, 2011
  • 03:12 PM
  • 1,078 views

Manganese as a Recorder of Hypoxia

by Dan in The Endolymph

I haven't been doing much writing about otoliths lately (at least not here), despite the goal of this blog being to write about otoliths.  In fact, recently I have been writing more about invasive species, which is a topic I absolutely hate!Really the only excuse I can come up with for not writing about otoliths is laziness.  I wanted to write about otoliths, I really did, I just needed some inspiration...which came in the form of some current events.  My interest was peaked when........ Read more »

Limburg KE, Olson C, Walther Y, Dale D, Slomp CP, & Høie H. (2011) PNAS Plus: Tracking Baltic hypoxia and cod migration over millennia with natural tags. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 21518871  

  • May 2, 2011
  • 01:52 PM
  • 1,288 views

May 2, 2011

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE ... Read more »

Helfand, B., Mendez, M., Murthy, S., Shumaker, D., Grin, B., Mahammad, S., Aebi, U., Wedig, T., Wu, Y., Hahn, K.... (2011) Vimentin Organization Modulates the Formation of Lamellipodia. Molecular Biology of the Cell. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E10-08-0699  

  • May 2, 2011
  • 01:00 PM
  • 1,924 views

Designer Genes for Special Bacterial Lifestyles

by Moselio Schaechter in Small Things Considered

by S. Marvin Friedman

Thanks to the extensive research of the past ten years, we've become aware that many prokaryotic endosymbionts and habitual intracellular pathogens have undergone genome reduction over evolutionary time. Characteristic of this process, termed reductive convergent evolution, is the discarding of genes involved in metabolic pathways and regulatory functions that have become superfluous now that cells can scavenge host nutrients. The high percentage of noncoding DNA (includin........ Read more »

Song H, Hwang J, Yi H, Ulrich RL, Yu Y, Nierman WC, & Kim HS. (2010) The early stage of bacterial genome-reductive evolution in the host. PLoS pathogens, 6(5). PMID: 20523904  

Mathee K, Narasimhan G, Valdes C, Qiu X, Matewish JM, Koehrsen M, Rokas A, Yandava CN, Engels R, Zeng E.... (2008) Dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105(8), 3100-5. PMID: 18287045  

  • May 1, 2011
  • 02:49 AM
  • 2,350 views

A Call to Arms: Lab Safety

by Paige Brown in From The Lab Bench

I don my lab coat, ready for an afternoon of experiments. After some rummaging, I finally find a pair of safety glasses, a rare commodity in a lab of 30 students where monies appear to be scant when it comes to procuring new personal protective equipment. I'll be hiding this pair in my office.

"I need 5 milliliters a 1molar solution."

A senior postdoc hands me a bottle of some white powdery substance, and waves me toward the dry chemical balance on the lab bench. I glance ........ Read more »

Editorial. (2011) Accidents in waiting. Nature, 472(7343), 259. PMID: 21512528  

Van Noorden R. (2011) A death in the lab. Nature, 472(7343), 270-1. PMID: 21512544  

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