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  • February 11, 2011
  • 12:29 PM
  • 1,502 views

The woods that were

by Tim De Chant in Per Square Mile

Half a block from my childhood home is a park in which I spent countless hours. But it isn’t your ordinary city park. Within the confines of its unusually large 14 acres lie three distinct forests, each a snapshot of a period in time for America’s eastern hardwood forests. At the time, the smallest was [...]... Read more »

  • February 11, 2011
  • 11:39 AM
  • 2,881 views

Regulation of mitochondrial protein transport

by Vasili Hauryliuk in stringent response

Mitochondria have their own genome, own translational machinery, own ribosomes, but still, most of the proteins they import from the cytosole. And this they do using two protein complexes in the outer and inner membranes: TOM (Transporter Outer Membrane) and TIM (Transporter Inner Membrane). TOM itself consists of several subunits: Tom40 forms a pore through which proteins get transported, Tom20 and Tom70 work as receptors recognizing the mitochondrial proteins in the cytoplasm, and several........ Read more »

Chacinska A, Koehler CM, Milenkovic D, Lithgow T, & Pfanner N. (2009) Importing mitochondrial proteins: machineries and mechanisms. Cell, 138(4), 628-44. PMID: 19703392  

Schmidt O, Harbauer AB, Rao S, Eyrich B, Zahedi RP, Stojanovski D, Schönfisch B, Guiard B, Sickmann A, Pfanner N.... (2011) Regulation of mitochondrial protein import by cytosolic kinases. Cell, 144(2), 227-39. PMID: 21215441  

  • February 11, 2011
  • 10:46 AM
  • 1,721 views

Scientists Uncover One of the Smallest Dinosaurs Ever

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

Another month, another alvarezsaur. In January, paleontologists announced the discovery of a small, one-fingered dinosaur from Inner Mongolia named Linhenykus, and another team of paleontologists has just published the description of a related, slightly older creature in the latest Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. They named it Albinykus baatar, and it was one of the smallest [...]... Read more »

  • February 11, 2011
  • 10:05 AM
  • 1,063 views

HIV & Measles – double hit pathogenesis?

by Connor Bamford in The Rule of 6ix

Despite ongoing worldwide eradication efforts, measles infection still results in significant morbidity and mortality. Although, throughout most of the developed world measles infection has been considerably reduced there still exists massive (and deadly) outbreaks in areas such as Africa and South-East Asia. Investigation of the reasons why this disparity occurs therefore  is of major medical, [...]... Read more »

  • February 11, 2011
  • 10:05 AM
  • 1,530 views

HIV & Measles - double hit pathogenesis?

by Connor Bamford in The Rule of 6ix


Despite ongoing worldwide eradication efforts, measles infection still results in significant morbidity and mortality. Although, throughout most of the developed world measles infection has been considerably reduced there still exists massive (and deadly) outbreaks in areas such as Africa and South-East Asia. Investigation of the reasons why this disparity occurs therefore  is of major medical, political and social interest.
Many factors are likely to be behind this major difference - and ........ Read more »

  • February 11, 2011
  • 09:27 AM
  • 1,311 views

The Search for New Antibiotics: Looking for Achilles’ Heel (Again)

by Isobel in Promega Connections

Some of the first available doses of penicillin were used to treat allied soldiers wounded on D-Day. It was the end of one war, but just the beginning of another–one that has gone on for a long time. The story of the development of antibiotics, and the emergence of resistant bacteria, followed by the renewed [...]... Read more »

Smith CL, Ghosh J, Elam JS, Pinkner JS, Hultgren SJ, Caparon MG, & Ellenberger T. (2011) Structural Basis of Streptococcus pyogenes Immunity to Its NAD( ) Glycohydrolase Toxin. Structure (London, England : 1993), 19(2), 192-202. PMID: 21300288  

  • February 11, 2011
  • 05:30 AM
  • 928 views

The birth and death of stem cells

by Becky in It Takes 30

Jeremy Gunawardena suggested that it would be appropriate to write about one of Ernest McCulloch’s papers, given the news that he passed away last week.  McCulloch, together with James Till, was responsible for the original demonstration that stem cells actually exist.  He was 84 when he died, two weeks short of the 50th anniversary of [...]... Read more »

  • February 11, 2011
  • 01:37 AM
  • 857 views

Why Lucy, what sweet kicks you had

by zacharoo in Lawn Chair Anthropology

For decades people have debated whether Australopithecus afarensis was an obligate biped like us, or whether our ancestor was a little less lithe in life on land. They asked, sort of, "Would Lucy have rocked some sweet Air Jordans, or would she have put some flat-foot orthotics in her new kicks?"
Carol Ward and colleagues report on a new fourth metatarsal of Australopithecus afarensis from Hadar in Ethiopia, over 3.2 million years old. The foot bone shows that A. afarensis had the two foot arche........ Read more »

  • February 10, 2011
  • 11:45 PM
  • 1,745 views

Resource Partitioning in Sharks – How Predators Get Along

by Chuck in Ya Like Dags?

I’ve reached a point in the analysis and writing of my thesis where I can start exploring the ecological concepts behind my results, which inspired me to put up this little post here.  In the marine environment, there is often … Continue reading →... Read more »

Laptikhovsky, V.V., Arkhipkin, A.I., & Henderson, A.C. (2001) Feeding habits and dietary overlap in spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias (Squalidae) and narrowmouth catshark Schroederichthys bivius (Scyliorhinidae). Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 1015-1018. info:/

  • February 10, 2011
  • 04:49 PM
  • 1,899 views

Folk Myth : Can shoe size predict penile length?

by Hel in Substantia Innominata

A folk myth really popular says: (imagine the voice of an old old old old man telling an old old old old legend) “To know the size of the penis of a guy, see his Feet/Nose/Hand/Thumb/Toe/Hair/Dog/Cat/Goat/Number-of-porn-movie-in-his-computer*”. Some scientific have decided to verify this folk myth. There are a kind of MythBusters** of sex. These 3 [...]... Read more »

Park JS, Woo JC, Park NC,. (1999) Body Predictive Index of Penile Size. The Korean Journal of Andrology. info:/

Siminoski, K., & Bain, J. (1993) The Relationships Among Height, Penile Length, and Foot Size. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 6(3), 231-235. DOI: 10.1177/107906329300600305  

Shah J, & Christopher N. (2002) Can shoe size predict penile length?. BJU international, 90(6), 586-7. PMID: 12230622  

Chen J, Gefen A, Greenstein A, Matzkin H, & Elad D. (2000) Predicting penile size during erection. International journal of impotence research, 12(6), 328-33. PMID: 11416836  

  • February 10, 2011
  • 02:21 PM
  • 1,263 views

Circligase II-based detection of miRNAs

by epibio in EpiCentral

In a recent publication, Kumar et al. demonstrate the power of their “miR-ID” method in expression profiling of microRNA (miRNA) molecules. The authors used a ligase-based recircularization procedure and compared T4 RNA Ligase to Epicentre’s Circligase™ II enzyme (typically used for ssDNA circularization) in recircularization of miRNAs. They found that, while both ligases were able to join the ends of standard miRNA molecules with 2’ and 3’-hydroxyl groups, only Circligase II-based r........ Read more »

  • February 10, 2011
  • 12:52 PM
  • 809 views

Tongue Eating Louse

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

The tongue eating louse (Cymothoa exigua) is a strange parasite best known for consuming and replacing itself with the host's tongue. Post features images, videos and facts of this strange species.... Read more »

  • February 10, 2011
  • 12:52 PM
  • 720 views

Tongue Eating Louse

by beredim in Strange Animals

The tongue eating louse (Cymothoa exigua) is a strange parasite best known for consuming and replacing itself with the host's tongue. Post features images, videos and facts of this strange species.... Read more »

  • February 10, 2011
  • 12:26 PM
  • 1,248 views

The Dodo is Dead, Long Live the Dodo!

by Laelaps in Laelaps


The Dodo, Didus, is a bird that inhabits some of the islands of the East Indies. Its history is little known; but if the representation of it be at all just, this is the ugliest and most disgusting of birds, resembling in its appearance one of those bloated and unwieldy persons who by a long [...]... Read more »

Hume, Julian; Datta, Ann; Martill, David M. (2006) Unpublished drawings of the Dodo Raphus cucullatus and notes on Dodo skin relics. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 126(A). info:/

Nicholls, H. (2006) Ornithology: Digging for dodo. Nature, 443(7108), 138-140. DOI: 10.1038/443138a  

Shapiro, B. (2002) Flight of the Dodo. Science, 295(5560), 1683-1683. DOI: 10.1126/science.295.5560.1683  

  • February 10, 2011
  • 12:16 PM
  • 855 views

Synthetic Biology, or Science Fiction?

by Paige Brown in From The Lab Bench

Craig Venter describes synthetic biology as a process of ‘digitizing’ life, where the possibility for designing new life forms is limited only “by biological reality and our imagination.”... Read more »

Gibson, D., Glass, J., Lartigue, C., Noskov, V., Chuang, R., Algire, M., Benders, G., Montague, M., Ma, L., Moodie, M.... (2010) Creation of a Bacterial Cell Controlled by a Chemically Synthesized Genome. Science, 329(5987), 52-56. DOI: 10.1126/science.1190719  

  • February 10, 2011
  • 10:47 AM
  • 889 views

Is Vilyuisk encephalitis a viral disease?

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

A type of human encephalitis – an infection of the brain – has been known to affect the indigenous people living in the Sakha Republic of Russia since the mid-1800s. The available clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that the disease is caused by a pathogen, but proving this has been difficult. The disease is called [...]... Read more »

  • February 10, 2011
  • 10:10 AM
  • 662 views

Genetics and Pain

by Elaine Westwick in The Stuff of Life

Last year there was a post on Body in Mind in response to an article published on the genetics of chronic pain. With refreshing honesty the author admitted he “was going to write a blog-post on it and then I read it and I was too intimidated by it.”

I had a look at the paper, with my molecular biology background, it wasn’t too scary. I was interested in the original blog post as it intersects many parts of my life. First my original training as a biochemist, second my curren........ Read more »

Nissenbaum J, Devor M, Seltzer Z, Gebauer M, Michaelis M, Tal M, Dorfman R, Abitbul-Yarkoni M, Lu Y, Elahipanah T.... (2010) Susceptibility to chronic pain following nerve injury is genetically affected by CACNG2. Genome research, 20(9), 1180-90. PMID: 20688780  

  • February 10, 2011
  • 09:41 AM
  • 1,008 views

Great Articles Honoring the Human Genome’s 10th Anniversary

by aviwener in Canadian Biotechnologist 2.0

This month marks the tenth anniversary of the seminal papers published in Nature and Science detailing the near completion of the human genome. In honor of that event, Science has announced a month-long series that will include news features and brief essays that explore the impacts of the genomics revolution on science and society. Access [...]... Read more »

  • February 10, 2011
  • 08:04 AM
  • 893 views

A spectacular new fossil provides insight on the sex lives of pterosaurs, part I

by Darren Naish in Tetrapod Zoology



We know all too little about the biology and behaviour of the pterosaurs, the amazing, often bizarre flying reptiles of the Mesozoic Era. Most of our ideas - about feeding behaviour, locomotion, physiology and social and sexual behaviour - are inferences based on bones, or inferences based on interpretations of the bones. A new paper - published just a few weeks ago by Junchang Lü, David Unwin and colleagues in the journal Science - describes what might be one of the most interesting pterosau........ Read more »

Lü J, Unwin DM, Deeming DC, Jin X, Liu Y, & Ji Q. (2011) An egg-adult association, gender, and reproduction in pterosaurs. Science (New York, N.Y.), 331(6015), 321-4. PMID: 21252343  

  • February 10, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,326 views

What big eyes you have!

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

“My goodness, Gammarus, what big eyes you have!”

There are a lot of possible answers to Red Riding Hoods question. You might have big eyes to help you navigate in the world, to find resources, mates, and all sorts of things. If you see variation in eye size in populations, it will be tricky to figure out what the selection pressure on eye size is, because eyes do so many different jobs.

In the case of one amphipod crustacean, the answer to Red’s question seems to be:

“All the better ........ Read more »

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