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  • April 27, 2011
  • 10:25 AM
  • 1,415 views

Mutations in CD20 can cause resistance in rituximab treated lymphoma

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

A while back, I was discussing Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL) with someone and we pondered the question, “Why do some patients develop resistance to therapy with rituximab and others do not?” The answer wasn’t immediately obvious at that time, but this … Continue reading →
... Read more »

Mishima, Y., Terui, Y., Takeuchi, K., Matsumoto-Mishima, Y., Matsusaka, S., Utsubo-Kuniyoshi, R., & Hatake, K. (2011) The identification of irreversible rituximab-resistant lymphoma caused by CD20 gene mutations. Blood Cancer Journal, 1(4). DOI: 10.1038/bcj.2011.11  

  • April 27, 2011
  • 08:44 AM
  • 1,259 views

Mapping the cardiac neural crest in the frog’s heart

by saintj in the Node

The Node’s staff asked me to write a short “behind the scenes” on our paper just released in the May 15 issue of Development, “Cardiac neural crest is dispensable for outflow tract septation in Xenopus” http://dev.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/dev.061614 In the summer of 2008 when Dr. Young-Hoon Lee joined my laboratory from Chonbuk National University for a sabbatical [...]... Read more »

  • April 27, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,213 views

Review: Written in Stone

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

I expected this book to be about the fossil record, but it’s more accurate to say it’s the record of the fossil record.

By which I mean this:

Each chapter covers one animal group, usually (but not always) that has undergone a major transition in form. Land mammals to whales, fish to tetrapods, and dinosaurs to birds are all featured. The narrative of each chapter, however, follows the history of the science rather than the science of the history.

There are wonderful stories here that I ha........ Read more »

Switek B. (2010) Written In Stone. Bellevue Literary Press, 1-320. info:/978-1934137291

  • April 26, 2011
  • 07:27 PM
  • 2,065 views

Metagenomics: Transforming our understanding of oceans

by Holly Bik in Deep Sea News

If you’ve ever talked to me in person for more than 5 minutes, I’ve probably mentioned the !#$%*ING AWESOMENESS of high-throughput sequencing.  Frankly, I’m a bit obsessed.  If my life were an SAT analogy, it would be Dr Bik:Sequencing platforms as Teenage Girls:Twilight.  My gorgeous Illumina never sleeps (runs 2 weeks straight for . . . → Read More: Metagenomics: Transforming our understanding of oceans... Read more »

Gilbert, J., & Dupont, C. (2011) Microbial Metagenomics: Beyond the Genome. Annual Review of Marine Science, 3(1), 347-371. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-marine-120709-142811  

  • April 26, 2011
  • 04:54 PM
  • 1,000 views

Titanic DNA

by Trey in Genomes Are Us

So here’s an odd piece of trivia: my name is on the list of the Titanic deceased. Yep. I was in a museum in Cork with the family on a trip, and I was looking over the list of those who died. As one does, I scanned down the alphabet to see if there were[continue reading...]... Read more »

Just, R., Loreille, O., Molto, J., Merriwether, D., Woodward, S., Matheson, C., Creed, J., McGrath, S., Sturk-Andreaggi, K., Coble, M.... (2011) Titanic's unknown child: The critical role of the mitochondrial DNA coding region in a re-identification effort. Forensic Science International: Genetics, 5(3), 231-235. DOI: 10.1016/j.fsigen.2010.01.012  

  • April 26, 2011
  • 04:30 PM
  • 1,543 views

Producing and Extracting Biofuel Precursors from Cyanobacteria

by Michael Long in Phased

Cyanobacteria were genetically engineered to overproduce fatty acids, which were readily extracted.... Read more »

Liu, X., Sheng, J., & Curtiss III, R. (2011) Fatty acid production in genetically modified cyanobacteria. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1103014108  

  • April 26, 2011
  • 11:40 AM
  • 850 views

Richard Branson: Noble Conservationist or Meddling Entrepreneur?

by Nature Education in Student Voices

The interest of Sir Richard Branson , chairman of Virgin Group , seems to have...... Read more »

Allesina S., & Levine J. M. (2011) A competitive network theory of species diversity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 108(14), 5638-42. PMID: 21415368  

  • April 26, 2011
  • 09:05 AM
  • 2,246 views

Deprived of pollinators, flowers evolve to do without

by Jeremy Yoder in Denim and Tweed

.flickr-photo { }.flickr-framewide { float: right; text-align: left; margin-left: 15px; margin-bottom: 15px; width:100%;}.flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Who needs pollinators? Not monkeyflowers—at least not after a few generations of evolution. Photo by Brewbooks.The loss of animal pollinators poses a potentially big problem for plants. However, many plant species that rely on animals to move pollen from anther to stigma have the capacity to make due if that service goes........ Read more »

  • April 26, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,484 views

Tuesday Crustie: What a happy lad since the day he lost his strings

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo


Squat lobsters are not terribly well known, and this is a new species in a genus that even I didn’t know about: Uroptychus.

This species is being split off from Uroptychus naso (“naso” means nose), which is found in the western Pacific. The new species was spotted because of genetic surveys. Two lineages of mitochondrial DNA were found in samples, which prompted a closer look at what had been thought to be a single species.

Once they had spotted the genetic difference, the authors went ........ Read more »

Poore GCB, & Andreakis N. (2011) Morphological, molecular and biogeographic evidence support two new species in the Uroptychus naso complex (Crustacea: Decapoda: Chirostylidae) . Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. info:/10.1016/j.ympev.2011.03.032

  • April 26, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,051 views

Looking for hope

by Zen Faulkes in Marmorkrebs

When I went to the International Association for Astacology meeting last year, the first couple of days were largely concerned with crayfish as invasive species. The phrase that kept kept popping into my head was, “horror show.”

A new review article taps into that concern, asking flat out, “Is there a hope?” in the title. Note the use of the singular. Things are so bad, we are just looking for one hope.

Marmorkrebs make a brief cameo appearance in the paper:

Today, it is extremely eas........ Read more »

Gherardi F, Aquiloni L, Diéguez-Uribeondo J, & Tricarico E. (2011) Managing invasive crayfish: is there a hope?. Aquatic Sciences, 73(2), 185-200. DOI: 10.1007/s00027-011-0181-z  

  • April 25, 2011
  • 10:58 PM
  • 1,135 views

What big teeth you have indeed

by zacharoo in Lawn Chair Anthropology

If our friend Little Red Riding Hood was dumb enough to've thought a wolf in babushka threads was her grandma, well, she probably would have played Bingo with a grandmother-mimicking Australopithecus anamensis.... Read more »

Kunimatsu, Y., Nakatsukasa, M., Sawada, Y., Sakai, T., Hyodo, M., Hyodo, H., Itaya, T., Nakaya, H., Saegusa, H., Mazurier, A.... (2007) A new Late Miocene great ape from Kenya and its implications for the origins of African great apes and humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(49), 19220-19225. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0706190104  

White, T., WoldeGabriel, G., Asfaw, B., Ambrose, S., Beyene, Y., Bernor, R., Boisserie, J., Currie, B., Gilbert, H., Haile-Selassie, Y.... (2006) Asa Issie, Aramis and the origin of Australopithecus. Nature, 440(7086), 883-889. DOI: 10.1038/nature04629  

  • April 25, 2011
  • 05:18 PM
  • 1,196 views

What happened with that Sumerian 'sivathere' figurine after Colbert's paper of 1936? Well, a lot.

by Darren Naish in Tetrapod Zoology



I don't do requests on Tet Zoo, but when enough people ask me about the same thing it does get into my head. Ever since the early days of ver 1 people have been asking me about late-surviving sivatheres. What, they ask, is the deal with those various pieces of rock art and that Sumerian figurine - discovered in Iraq - that apparently depict Sivatherium? As most of you will know, Sivatherium was a large, short-necked giraffid, originally described for S. giganteus from the Siwalik Hills of Indi........ Read more »

Colbert, E. N. (1936) Was the extinct giraffe (Sivatherium) known to the ancient Sumerians?. American Anthropologist, 605-608. info:/

  • April 25, 2011
  • 03:00 PM
  • 897 views

If You Want to Practice Evidence Based Medicine then… Use the Evidence

by Keith Grimaldi in Eurogene

Discussion of meta-analysis about folic acid, homocysteine and cardiovascular disease. Aim is to demonstrate that short clinical trials are nut useful for established evidence for primary prevention of nutrients... Read more »

  • April 25, 2011
  • 01:00 PM
  • 1,572 views

Coping with Hard Times: Death As an Option

by Moselio Schaechter in Small Things Considered

First, some musings about life and death, two matters that don't seem to occupy the same space in our brain. We tend to celebrate the former and resent the latter, and we often see the world through this perspective. Only on reflection do we realize how wrong this is, especially with regard to biology. The cycle of life depends fundamentally on living things dying. But this is not always the prevailing way we approach biological questions. Think of how long it took for the concept of apoptosis ........ Read more »

  • April 25, 2011
  • 11:40 AM
  • 1,416 views

Out of Gondwana: the early evolution of bees

by Lucas in thoughtomics

Masonry is serious business for mason bees. They build their brood cells inside cavities such as hollow reeds, rotting wood or cracks in buildings. They first fill these cells with pollen and nectar, to feed the larvae that will grow inside, before sealing them off with a mix of mud and sand. The mud partitions [...]... Read more »

Litman JR, Danforth BN, Eardley CD, & Praz CJ. (2011) Why do leafcutter bees cut leaves? New insights into the early evolution of bees. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society. PMID: 21490010  

  • April 25, 2011
  • 11:32 AM
  • 1,050 views

“I Know My Neighbour: Individual Recognition in Octopus vulgaris”

by Mike Mike in Cephalove

Most species of shallow water octopuses appear to be pretty solitary animals. They live in dens and venture out from them to hunt or find mates; defending these dens and getting busy are the only social interaction that many species of octopuses are observed to have in the wild. I like to think of them [...]... Read more »

Elena Tricarico, Luciana Borrelli, Francesca Gherardi, Graziano Fiorito. (2011) I Know My Neighbour: Individual Recognition in Octopus vulgaris. PLOS One. info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0018710

  • April 25, 2011
  • 11:32 AM
  • 930 views

“I Know My Neighbour: Individual Recognition in Octopus vulgaris”

by Mike Mike in Cephalove

Most species of shallow water octopuses appear to be pretty solitary animals. They live in dens and venture out from them to hunt or find mates; defending these dens and getting busy are the only social interaction that many species of octopuses are observed to have in the wild. I like to think of them [...]... Read more »

Elena Tricarico, Luciana Borrelli, Francesca Gherardi, Graziano Fiorito. (2011) I Know My Neighbour: Individual Recognition in Octopus vulgaris. PLOS One. info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0018710

  • April 25, 2011
  • 11:15 AM
  • 2,082 views

Man of Steel: Armor, not weapons, protects harvestmen from certain doom

by Matt Soniak in mattsoniak.com

A lot of people mistake harvestmen for spiders, but there are two big differences between the two orders of arachnids. One, harvestmen do not scare the living shit out of me and I do not need to my girlfriend to kill any that wander into our house. Two, the eight-legged freaks commonly called daddy longlegs [...]... Read more »

  • April 25, 2011
  • 09:30 AM
  • 1,696 views

Otto West: Apes don’t read [genomics]

by Mary in OpenHelix

Otto West: Apes don’t read philosophy.
Wanda: Yes they do, Otto. They just don’t understand it.
–A Fish Called Wanda

Some of you remember that last year we were treated to a strange case of DNA denialism that was making the rounds of the foodie community. Michael Pollan was all excited and aerated about it for some reason. Even Marion Nestle, who should know better, propagated this cherry-picked and non-peer-reviewed “study” that purported to show that DNA had no i........ Read more »

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