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  • February 26, 2015
  • 03:04 PM
  • 47 views

Dr. Frankenstein might be impressed, the human head transplant

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Sure it sounds like something from the book Frankenstein, but Sergio Canavero of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group has made it known that he intends to announce at this summer’s American Academy of Neurological and Orthopedic Surgeons meeting, that he believes he has put together a group of techniques that should make it possible to attach a human donor body to a head.... Read more »

  • February 25, 2015
  • 12:02 AM
  • 55 views

Can’t stand the sounds of chewing, loud breathing, or pen clicking? Dutch psychiatrists propose that may be the symptom of a new disorder

by Megan Cartwright in Science-Based Writing

Dutch psychiatrists have proposed that misophonia – a hypersensitivity to common, irritating noises like eating, loud breathing, and pen clicking – be classified as its own psychiatric disorder. After evaluating 42 Dutch patients with the disorder, the psychiatrists concluded that … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 23, 2015
  • 04:21 PM
  • 49 views

Brain waves help memory formation

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Our brains generate a constant hum of activity: As neurons fire, they produce brain waves that oscillate at different frequencies. Long thought to be merely a byproduct of neuron activity, recent studies suggest that these waves may play a critical role in communication between different parts of the brain.... Read more »

  • February 23, 2015
  • 06:23 AM
  • 48 views

Greenish Red: Does It Exist?

by RAZ Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

Why is there no such thing as greenish red? Learn everything about color oppositions and experience fun optical illusions ... Read more »

Neitz J, & Neitz M. (2011) The genetics of normal and defective color vision. Vision research, 51(7), 633-51. PMID: 21167193  

  • February 22, 2015
  • 07:00 PM
  • 68 views

New neurons in the adult brain help us adapt

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The discovery that the human brain continues to produce new neurons in adulthood challenged a major dogma in the field of neuroscience, but the role of these neurons in behavior and cognition is still not clear. In a review article researchers synthesize the vast literature on this topic, reviewing environmental factors that influence the birth of new neurons in the adult hippocampus, a region of the brain that plays an important role in memory and learning.... Read more »

  • February 22, 2015
  • 09:57 AM
  • 59 views

Associating brain structure with function and the bias of more = better

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

It seems that, of all of the behavioral neuroscience findings that make their way into popular press coverage, those that involve structural changes to the brain are most likely to pique the interest of the public. Perhaps this is because we have a tendency to think of brain function as something that is flexible and constantly changing, and thus alterations in function do not seem as dramatic as alterations in structure, which give the impression of being more permanent.After all, until relativ........ Read more »

Lazar, S., Kerr, C., Wasserman, R., Gray, J., Greve, D., Treadway, M., McGarvey, M., Quinn, B., Dusek, J., Benson, H.... (2005) Meditation experience is associated with increased cortical thickness. NeuroReport, 16(17), 1893-1897. DOI: 10.1097/01.wnr.0000186598.66243.19  

  • February 21, 2015
  • 02:36 PM
  • 81 views

Mental illness and ultradian rhythms

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In the relatively new 24 hour, always on the go, digital lifestyle we live — might living a structured life with regularly established mealtimes and early bedtimes lead to a better life and perhaps even prevent the onset of mental illness? Well according to a new study, it might do just that, you could have a better quality of life just by being a little more structured thanks to our circadian rhythm.... Read more »

  • February 20, 2015
  • 02:48 AM
  • 81 views

One Brain Network for All Mental Illness

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

What do schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, addiction, obsessive compulsive disorder, and anxiety have in common? A loss of gray matter in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and bilateral anterior insula, according to a recent review of the structural neuroimaging literature (Goodkind et al., 2015). These two brain regions are important for executive functions, the top-down cognitive processes that allow us to maintain goals and flexibly alter our behavior in response to ........ Read more »

Goodkind, M., Eickhoff, S., Oathes, D., Jiang, Y., Chang, A., Jones-Hagata, L., Ortega, B., Zaiko, Y., Roach, E., Korgaonkar, M.... (2015) Identification of a Common Neurobiological Substrate for Mental Illness. JAMA Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.2206  

  • February 19, 2015
  • 01:12 PM
  • 77 views

Circadian and ultradian rhytms in dopaminergic signalling might have consequences for psychopathology

by Caio Maximino in Caio Maximino - Research site and blog

Two recent articles shed light on how rhythmicity in dopaminergic signaling can be of relevance to some psychiatric disorders... Read more »

  • February 18, 2015
  • 11:53 AM
  • 82 views

Exercise Guidelines in Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

A series of seven guidelines for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has recently been published.These guidelines resulted from a conference of experts in nutrition and the brain.The guidelines included a recommendation for 40 minutes of aerobic exercise three times a week.Support for this exercise recommendation by experts was linked to 2 areas of research:Observational studies show lower rates of AD in regular exercise groups compared to sedentary groupsA single clinical trial found red........ Read more »

Barnard ND, Bush AI, Ceccarelli A, Cooper J, de Jager CA, Erickson KI, Fraser G, Kesler S, Levin SM, Lucey B.... (2014) Dietary and lifestyle guidelines for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiology of aging. PMID: 24913896  

  • February 18, 2015
  • 11:10 AM
  • 51 views

Now Available In Technicolor! #2: Color-Blindness

by RAZ Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

This week in RAZ’s colorful trilogy: What is color-blindness? She also included a test.... Read more »

Neitz J, & Neitz M. (2011) The genetics of normal and defective color vision. Vision research, 51(7), 633-51. PMID: 21167193  

  • February 18, 2015
  • 05:02 AM
  • 83 views

Fasting Fruit Flies: Improved Focus and Brain Power

by Pieter Carrière in United Academics

Fasting: solely a religious activity or is it also beneficial for focus and brain power? Research links fasting and hunger to formation of long-term memory.... Read more »

Hirano Y, Masuda T, Naganos S, Matsuno M, Ueno K, Miyashita T, Horiuchi J, & Saitoe M. (2013) Fasting launches CRTC to facilitate long-term memory formation in Drosophila. Science (New York, N.Y.), 339(6118), 443-6. PMID: 23349290  

Dubnau J. (2012) Neuroscience. Ode to the mushroom bodies. Science (New York, N.Y.), 335(6069), 664-5. PMID: 22323806  

Quinn, W., Harris, W., & Benzer, S. (1974) Conditioned Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 71(3), 708-712. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.71.3.708  

  • February 17, 2015
  • 02:26 PM
  • 86 views

Shopping while hungry leads to more non-food purchases

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever go shopping when you’re hungry and notice you walked out with a lot more than you were expecting to buy? While most people know that when you are hungry, you typically will buy more food (as illustrated by The Oatmeal above), new research shows that there is a clear link between hunger and buying non-food items. A team of international researchers has released a paper that describes five laboratory and field studies they conducted which showed how people respond to non-food objects when ........ Read more »

Alison Jing Xu, Norbert Schwarz, & Robert S. Wyer, Jr. (2015) Hunger promotes acquisition of nonfood objects. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. info:/10.1073/pnas.1417712112

  • February 16, 2015
  • 03:54 PM
  • 91 views

Cigarette Smoking Leads to Thinning of the Brain’s Cortex

by Vivek Misra in The UberBrain

Cigarette smoking is associated with cognitive decline and dementia, but the extent of the association between smoking and structural brain changes remains unclear. According to recent study published by Karama et.al., in Molecular Psychiatry, “long-term smoking could cause thinning of the outer layer of the brain involved in critical cognitive functions such as memory and language.” Although the cortex grows thinner with normal ageing, the study found that smoking appears to accelerate the ........ Read more »

Karama, S., Ducharme, S., Corley, J., Chouinard-Decorte, F., Starr, J., Wardlaw, J., Bastin, M., & Deary, I. (2015) Cigarette smoking and thinning of the brain’s cortex. Molecular Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1038/mp.2014.187  

  • February 15, 2015
  • 11:32 AM
  • 102 views

Brain mosaicism and altered gene copy numbers could explain Alzheimer's

by EE Giorgi in CHIMERAS

© EEGI've tackled the problem of the missing heritability in the past, i.e. the fact that despite all the research on genetic studies and disease associations, we can explain only a small fraction of cancers and disorders. Today we know a lot more than what we knew back when the human genome project was completed, and in particular we know how much we don't know. I think we are only beginning to understand the complexity of human diseases and genetics. Back when I started working on disease ass........ Read more »

  • February 14, 2015
  • 06:36 PM
  • 112 views

A very Sciencey Valentine’s day

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Happy valentines day! Okay maybe it’s turned into more of a reason to spend money on chocolate and flowers than it is about showing affection — which is probably why some people hate it — but it can still be a somewhat special day. Unfortunately I’ve been struggling on what I could do for my wife on valentines day. So I thought I would work it out here and maybe even help a few of you who are stuck as well.... Read more »

  • February 13, 2015
  • 01:20 PM
  • 85 views

Valentine’s Day Special: Drosophila in lust

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

Valentine’s Day is quickly approaching, which means that men (and women) all over the U.S. are performing courtship rituals to woo a companion. But while we humans often have trouble figuring out the right moves to attract a potential mate, fruit flies have it down to a science. And incredibly, researchers can study fruit fly […]... Read more »

  • February 12, 2015
  • 01:48 PM
  • 95 views

Possible mechanism underpinning Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s type diseases found

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Neurodegenerative diseases have remained stubbornly increasing in prevalence for sometime now. Unfortunately longer life does not mean a better quality of life. Thankfully that could change sooner than you think, scientists have for the first time discovered a killing mechanism that could underpin a range of the most intractable neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and ALS.... Read more »

Minghai Zhou, Gregory Ottenberg, Gian Franco Sferrazza, Christopher Hubbs, Mohammad Fallahi, Gavin Rumbaugh, Alicia F. Brantley, & Corinne I. Lasmézas. (2015) Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD replenishment. Brain - A Journal of Neurology. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awv002

  • February 12, 2015
  • 11:00 AM
  • 97 views

Happy Valentine's Day! What Is Love, Anyway?

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Just in time for Valentine's Day. What is love and why does it exist? Read how scientists have made great strides elucidating the evolutionary and biochemical basis for love.... Read more »

Love TM. (2014) Oxytocin, motivation and the role of dopamine. Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, 49-60. PMID: 23850525  

Domingue, B., Fletcher, J., Conley, D., & Boardman, J. (2014) Genetic and educational assortative mating among US adults. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(22), 7996-8000. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1321426111  

  • February 12, 2015
  • 09:06 AM
  • 79 views

What is the motive?

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

It is clear from bacteria to ourselves that cooperation has evolved many times in all sorts of organisms and so it clearly has an advantage that can be realized. However, it is also obvious that simple unquestioned cooperation works if everyone cooperates but would be a great disadvantage once cheaters became numerous. This looks like […]... Read more »

Hoffman, M., Yoeli, E., & Nowak, M. (2015) Cooperate without looking: Why we care what people think and not just what they do. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(6), 1727-1732. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1417904112  

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