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  • May 3, 2015
  • 03:54 PM
  • 2 views

Procrastinate much? Science offers a way to stop

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Procrastination is the thief of time that derails New Year’s resolutions and delays saving for college or retirement, but researchers have found a way to collar it.

The trick? Think of the future as now. ... Read more »

  • May 2, 2015
  • 02:01 PM
  • 32 views

Spontaneous Events Drive Brain Functional Connectivity?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A new study claims that Functional Connectivity in MRI Is Driven by Spontaneous BOLD Events

The researchers, Thomas Allan and colleagues from the University of Nottingham (one of the birthplaces of MRI), say that their results challenge the assumption that correlations in neural activity between 'networks' of brain regions reflect slow, steady low frequency oscillations within those networks. Instead, they report that the network connectivity is the result of occasional 'spikes' of coordinate... Read more »

Allan TW, Francis ST, Caballero-Gaudes C, Morris PG, Liddle EB, Liddle PF, Brookes MJ, & Gowland PA. (2015) Functional Connectivity in MRI Is Driven by Spontaneous BOLD Events. PloS one, 10(4). PMID: 25922945  

  • May 2, 2015
  • 05:55 AM
  • 40 views

Humans Navigate Naturally With Built-In GPS

by RAZ Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

Humans have a built-in neural map, and it’s shaped like a honeycomb.
... Read more »

Langston RF, Ainge JA, Couey JJ, Canto CB, Bjerknes TL, Witter MP, Moser EI, & Moser MB. (2010) Development of the spatial representation system in the rat. Science (New York, N.Y.), 328(5985), 1576-80. PMID: 20558721  

Solstad T, Boccara CN, Kropff E, Moser MB, & Moser EI. (2008) Representation of geometric borders in the entorhinal cortex. Science (New York, N.Y.), 322(5909), 1865-8. PMID: 19095945  

Tolman, E. (1948) Cognitive maps in rats and men. Psychological Review, 55(4), 189-208. DOI: 10.1037/h0061626  

  • April 30, 2015
  • 06:00 PM
  • 55 views

The Avengers: Is It Possible Someone Could Turn Into A Hulk?

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

In anticipation of the return of THE AVENGERS, we take a look at the science that could possibly help someone to turn into a HULK.... Read more »

  • April 30, 2015
  • 04:26 PM
  • 48 views

Pesticides alter bees’ brains, making them unable to live and reproduce adequately

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new report suggests that a particular class of pesticides called “neonicotinoids” wreaks havoc on the bee populations, ultimately putting some crops that rely on pollination in jeopardy. Specifically, these pesticides kill bee brain cells, rendering them unable to learn, gather food and reproduce. The report, however, also suggests that the effects of these pesticides on bee colonies may be reversible by decreasing or eliminating the use of these pesticides on plants pollinated by bees and........ Read more »

  • April 30, 2015
  • 10:35 AM
  • 58 views

Bupropion: A Non-stimulant ADHD Drug Treatment

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Stimulant drugs including dextroamphetamine (Adderall) and methylphenidate (Ritalin) remain among the most common and effective drug treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).Alternative to stimulant drugs are needed to expand treatment options for clinicians and patients.One problem with the stimulants is the potential for misuse and diversion of prescription drugs to illicit drug use.One non-stimulant FDA approved drug (atomoxetine/Strattera) is available in the U.S.An add........ Read more »

  • April 29, 2015
  • 02:47 PM
  • 64 views

Translational Findings: How fruit flies are helping us find cures for cancer

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

At universities and companies around the world, scientists are studying the mechanisms of cancer and tumors using fruit flies. They hope to identify failures in the genes that lead to cancer, and develop treatments to prevent or reverse these problems. Because approximately 60% of the genes associated with human cancers are shared with fruit flies, […]... Read more »

  • April 28, 2015
  • 02:44 PM
  • 63 views

The adolescent brain on alcohol: Changes last into adulthood

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Repeated alcohol exposure during adolescence results in long-lasting changes in the region of the brain that controls learning and memory, according to a research team at Duke Medicine that used a rodent model as a surrogate for humans. The study provides new insights at the cellular level for how alcohol exposure during adolescence, before the brain is fully developed, can result in cellular and synaptic abnormalities that have enduring, detrimental effects on behavior.... Read more »

Risher, M., Fleming, R., Risher, W., Miller, K., Klein, R., Wills, T., Acheson, S., Moore, S., Wilson, W., Eroglu, C.... (2015) Adolescent Intermittent Alcohol Exposure: Persistence of Structural and Functional Hippocampal Abnormalities into Adulthood. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. DOI: 10.1111/acer.12725  

  • April 28, 2015
  • 07:03 AM
  • 64 views

Mind-blowing Brain Cases: The Woman With Half A Brain

by Elisabeth Buhl Thubron in United Academics

Chinese woman without a cerebellum gives insight into neuroplasticity.... Read more »

  • April 27, 2015
  • 04:02 PM
  • 30 views

No Reason To Think That Thinking "Fuels Brain Cancer"

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

This week has seen a flurry of alarming headlines suggesting that thinking can make brain cancer grow quicker. For example:

HuffPo: Thinking Can Fuel The Growth Of Brain Tumors, Study Finds
Daily Mail: How your THOUGHTS can fuel brain tumours
Nation (Pakistan): Cancer ‘hijacks’ process of thinking



Well, whoever wrote these headlines is safe, then. The research in question in fact wasn't about thinking. It actually showed that the growth of tumours called gliomas could be increased... Read more »

Venkatesh, H., Johung, T., Caretti, V., Noll, A., Tang, Y., Nagaraja, S., Gibson, E., Mount, C., Polepalli, J., Mitra, S.... (2015) Neuronal Activity Promotes Glioma Growth through Neuroligin-3 Secretion. Cell. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.04.012  

  • April 27, 2015
  • 10:50 AM
  • 51 views

ADHD and Vehicular Accident Risk

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Attention and impulsive behaviors found in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can contribute to accident risk in children and adults.A recent study of adult drivers in France provides evidence for increased accident risk in adults with ADHD.Researchers at the Bordeaux University Hospital interviewed a series of adult drivers seen in the emergency department following a road traffic crash.A total of 777 eligible subjects completed assessments of accident information, distraction expo........ Read more »

  • April 27, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 56 views

As if Sustaining a TBI was not Enough….TBI May Accelerate Brain Aging

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A patient with a moderate or severe traumatic brain injury is likely to have structural brain changes that are associated with an older brain than his/her actual age.... Read more »

Cole JH, Leech R, Sharp DJ, & Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. (2015) Prediction of brain age suggests accelerated atrophy after traumatic brain injury. Annals of Neurology, 77(4), 571-81. PMID: 25623048  

  • April 26, 2015
  • 11:53 PM
  • 56 views

FDA says no to marketing FDDNP for CTE

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently admonished TauMark™, a brain diagnostics company, for advertising brain scans that can diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Alzheimer's disease, and other types of dementia. The Los Angeles Times reported that the FDA ordered UCLA researcher Dr. Gary Small and his colleague/business partner Dr. Jorge Barrio to remove misleading information from their company website (example shown below).CTE has been in the news because the neurodegene........ Read more »

Barrio, J., Small, G., Wong, K., Huang, S., Liu, J., Merrill, D., Giza, C., Fitzsimmons, R., Omalu, B., Bailes, J.... (2015) In vivo characterization of chronic traumatic encephalopathy using [F-18]FDDNP PET brain imaging. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201409952. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1409952112  

Zimmer, E., Leuzy, A., Gauthier, S., & Rosa-Neto, P. (2014) Developments in Tau PET Imaging. The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, 41(05), 547-553. DOI: 10.1017/cjn.2014.15  

  • April 25, 2015
  • 01:59 PM
  • 83 views

Mental disorders do not predict violence, so please stop

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

When Sandy Hook happened, it was so shocking that to this day, some don’t actually believe it happened. Shortly after, something frustrating happened, the shooter was labeled with aspergers. This helped drive the mental health and violence connection to the point that Time came out with an article dispelling that myth. Even now according to new longitudinal study of delinquent youth, most psychiatric disorders – including depression — do not predict future violent behavior. The only except........ Read more »

Elkington, K., Teplin, L., Abram, K., Jakubowski, J., Dulcan, M., & Welty, L. (2015) Psychiatric Disorders and Violence: A Study of Delinquent Youth After Detention. Journal of the American Academy of Child , 54(4), 302-31200000. DOI: 10.1016/j.jaac.2015.01.002  

  • April 24, 2015
  • 09:51 AM
  • 82 views

Marmoset Parents Teach Their Kids Not to Interrupt

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



No one expects a human infant to slide into the world with a good grasp of grammar. Marmosets, another kind of chatty primate, are also poor conversationalists when they're young. But their parents seem to teach them how it's done. Young marmosets learn the cardinal rule of having a conversation: don't interrupt. And if they mess up, their parents give them the silent treatment.

Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) live in large family groups in the forests of Brazil. "Because marmosets ... Read more »

Chow, C., Mitchell, J., & Miller, C. (2015) Vocal turn-taking in a non-human primate is learned during ontogeny. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282(1807), 20150069-20150069. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.0069  

  • April 24, 2015
  • 07:12 AM
  • 91 views

Momnesia: Does Pregnancy Really Change The Brain?

by Rebekah Morrow in United Academics

Pregnancy does cause brain alterations, but scientists still disagree about other factors.... Read more »

Standtlander, L. (2013) Memory and Perceptual Changes during Pregnancy. International Journal of Childbirth, 28(2). info:/

  • April 24, 2015
  • 07:12 AM
  • 80 views

Momnesia: Does Pregnancy Really Change The Brain?

by Rebekah Morrow in United Academics

Pregnancy does cause brain alterations, but scientists still disagree about other factors.... Read more »

Standtlander, L. (2013) Memory and Perceptual Changes during Pregnancy. International Journal of Childbirth, 28(2). info:/

  • April 23, 2015
  • 08:40 AM
  • 95 views

And I Keep Hitting Re-peat-peat-peat-peat-peat-peat

by Sarah Deffit in The 'Scope

Why do we do the things we do? Knowing the science behind bad habits may help you to break them. ... Read more »

Graybiel AM. (2008) Habits, rituals, and the evaluative brain. Annual review of neuroscience, 359-87. PMID: 18558860  

Quinn JM, Pascoe A, Wood W, & Neal DT. (2010) Can't control yourself? Monitor those bad habits. Personality , 36(4), 499-511. PMID: 20363904  

Yin HH, & Knowlton BJ. (2006) The role of the basal ganglia in habit formation. Nature reviews. Neuroscience, 7(6), 464-76. PMID: 16715055  

  • April 22, 2015
  • 12:13 PM
  • 84 views

Brain EEG and the Genetics of ADHD

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Twin studies in ADHD demonstrate a significant genetic contribution to the disorder.Linking this genetic influence to specific biomarkers may provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ADHD.Grainne McLoughlin and colleagues at the University of California San Diego and King's College London recently published a twin study of brain EEG and the genetics of ADHD.In their study 67 twin pairs (34 monozygotic and 33 dizygotic) between the ages of 12 and 15 years completed tasks measuring........ Read more »

  • April 21, 2015
  • 06:08 PM
  • 69 views

Is Synesthesia A Brain Disorder?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

In a provocative review paper just published, French neuroscientists Jean-Michel Hupé and Michel Dojat question the assumption that synesthesia is a neurological disorder.



In synesthesia, certain sensory stimuli involuntarily trigger other sensations. For example, in one common form of synesthesia, known as 'grapheme-color', certain letters are perceived as allied with, certain colors. In other cases, musical notes are associated with colors, or smells.

The cause of synesthesia is obsc... Read more »

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