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  • October 24, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,624 views

Smoking Duration vs. Intensity and the Impact on Lung Cancer Risk

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

Which is worse for the development of lung cancer — smoking heavily over a short period of time or smoking fewer cigarettes over many years?... Read more »

P Bach. (2003) Variations in Lung Cancer Risk Among Smokers. CancerSpectrum Knowledge Environment, 95(6), 470-478. DOI: 10.1093/jnci/95.6.470  

  • October 19, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,581 views

Individual Genetics, Coffee Consumption, BRCA1 and Breast Cancer

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

We’ve talked previously about the health benefits of coffee and the antioxidant compounds responsible for it’s bitterness. To add to the “perks” of coffee consumption, a recent report in the Journal of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention suggests that caffeine protects against breast cancer in women that have a BRCA1 gene mutation [1].... Read more »

J. Kotsopoulos, P. Ghadirian, A. El-Sohemy, H. T. Lynch, C. Snyder, M. Daly, S. Domchek, S. Randall, B. Karlan, P. Zhang.... (2007) The CYP1A2 Genotype Modifies the Association Between Coffee Consumption and Breast Cancer Risk Among BRCA1 Mutation Carriers. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers , 16(5), 912-916. DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-06-1074  

  • October 15, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,589 views

Biodegradable Polymers for Drug and Gene Delivery

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

In participation with Blog Action Day, an event where bloggers from around the world unite to put a single important issue on everyone’s mind - the environment - today’s article discusses recent advances in the use of biodegradable materials for drug and gene delivery.... Read more »

John Barry, Marta MCG Silva, Vladimir K Popov, Kevin M Shakesheff, & Steven M Howdle. (2006) Supercritical carbon dioxide: putting the fizz into biomaterials. Philosophical Transactions: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, 364(1838), 249-261. DOI: 10.1098/rsta.2005.1687  

J J Green, G T Zugates, N C Tedford, Y-H Huang, L G Griffith, D A Lauffenburger, J A Sawicki, R Langer, & D G Anderson. (2007) Combinatorial Modification of Degradable Polymers Enables Transfection of Human Cells Comparable to Adenovirus. Advanced Materials, 19(19), 2836-2842. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700371  

  • October 4, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,915 views

Overweight Kids and TV: An Advertising Epidemic

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

On Saturday afternoon, September 29th, 2007, the cable television channel Nickelodeon showed nothing for three hours to celebrate “Worldwide Day of Play”, encouraging children to get off the couch and be active. The “Worldwide Day of Play” is part of Nickelodeon’s “Let’s Just Play” campaign, in partner with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, to encourage kids to participate in active, healthy and playful lifestyles. The goal of the Alliance f........ Read more »

  • October 1, 2007
  • 02:12 PM
  • 1,683 views

Chocoholics Anonymous

by David Bradley in Reactive Reports Chemistry Blog

It probably will not come as a surprise that scientific research funded by chocolate makers Nestlé has demonstrated a link between our love of chocolate and a specific chemical signature programmed into our metabolism. The signature reads “chocolate lover” in some people and indifference to the popular sweet in others, the researchers say.

Sunil Kochhar of [...]... Read more »

Rezzi, S., Ramadan, Z., Martin, F., Fay, L., van Bladeren, P., Lindon, J., Nicholson, J., & Kochhar, S. (2007) Human Metabolic Phenotypes Link Directly to Specific Dietary Preferences in Healthy Individuals. Journal of Proteome Research, 6(11), 4469-4477. DOI: 10.1021/pr070431h  

  • September 14, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,318 views

Novel Gene Suppresses Tumor Growth in Multiple Cancers

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

A novel gene was discovered recently that suppresses the growth of human tumors in a number of different cancers. The study, published in the journal Nature Medicine, found that the gene HACE1, an acronym for HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1, is able to help cells deal with various forms of stress that cause tumor formation [1].... Read more »

Liyong Zhang, Michael S Anglesio, Maureen O'Sullivan, Fan Zhang, Ge Yang, Renu Sarao, Mai P Nghiem, Shane Cronin, Hiromitsu Hara, Nataliya Melnyk.... (2007) The E3 ligase HACE1 is a critical chromosome 6q21 tumor suppressor involved in multiple cancers. Nature Medicine, 13(9), 1060-1069. DOI: 10.1038/nm1621  

  • September 7, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,254 views

Green Chemistry Mimics the Cellular Process of Drug Synthesis

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

Two studies were published in the September 2007 issue of Nature Chemical Biology demonstrating for the first time that it’s possible to take a complex chain of enzymatic reactions and reconstruct them in vitro (meaning in a test tube) to synthesize a natural product that has therapeutic potential.... Read more »

Qian Cheng, Longkuan Xiang, Miho Izumikawa, Dario Meluzzi, & Bradley Moore. (2007) Enzymatic total synthesis of enterocin polyketides. Nature Chemical Biology, 3(9), 557-558. DOI: 10.1038/nchembio.2007.22  

  • September 4, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,285 views

Irreversible Gene Expression Changes From Smoking

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

Recent research published in the online open journal BMC Genomics shows that smoking leads to changes in gene expression, some of which are reversible and some of which are permanent. Genes that are irreversibly changed may help to explain why former smokers, even after 10 years of not smoking, are still more susceptible to lung cancer than those who have never smoked.... Read more »

Raj Chari, Kim Lonergan, Raymond Ng, Calum MacAulay, Wan Lam, & Stephen Lam. (2007) Effect of active smoking on the human bronchial epithelium transcriptome. BMC Genomics, 8(1), 297. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-8-297  

  • August 27, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,638 views

Healthy Fast Food Not So Healthy

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

Have you ever wondered if those healthy fast food meals are really any better for you? McDonald’s has the Fruit ‘n Yogurt Parfait, Wendy’s offers Garden Sensations salads and at Burger King you can even get a veggie burger. Yogurt, salad, veggie burger … these are all healthy foods. However, new research suggests that healthy fast food meals have the same effect on your cardiovascular system as a burger, fries and a soda.... Read more »

Tanja K Rudolph, Kaike Ruempler, Edzard Schwedhelm, Jing Tan-Andresen, Ulrich Riederer, Rainer H Böger, & Renke Maas. (2007) Acute effects of various fast-food meals on vascular function and cardiovascular disease risk markers: the Hamburg Burger Trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 86(2), 334-340. DOI: 17684202  

  • August 1, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,356 views

What You Believe Can Kill You

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

The Washington Post published a story yesterday stating that Personal Health Beliefs are Largely Hit and Myth. The story discusses the results of an American Cancer Society (ACS) study released last week, which will be published in the September 1st issue of the journal Cancer. The study assessed the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of scientifically unsubstantiated beliefs about cancer risk, finding that [1]: … beliefs in several scientifically unsubstantiated cancer risk state........ Read more »

  • June 29, 2007
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,738 views

Second-hand Smoke Exposure Linked to Psychological Problems in Children

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

The first evidence linking mothers' second-hand smoke exposure while pregnant to their child's attention deficit disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder has been published in the current issue of Child Psychiatry and Human Development. ADHD and conduct disorder behaviors are called externalizing psychopathology with symtoms that include aggressive behavior, ADHD, defiance and conduct disorder.... Read more »

  • December 1, 2006
  • 01:16 PM
  • 1,915 views

Bedwetting Chemistry

by David Bradley in Reactive Reports Chemistry Blog

A higher concentration of sodium and urea in urine could underlie a type of bedwetting in children that does not respond to the common medication, desmopressin. The levels of these natural substances could indicate an imbalance of the hormone-like compound prostaglandin, and suggests a new approach to treating this common problem.

Out of every ten children [...]... Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:33 PM
  • 1,349 views

Experimental Biology Blogging: High and Low Cocaine Responding Rats, Cocaine Abuse, and the Norepinephrine Transporter

by Scicurious in Neurotic Physiology

Cocaine, and other drugs of abuse, are difficult things to predict. We know to some extent what their initial effects on the brain are, how they act, and some of the things that we can do. But what we don't know, is who will become addicted to them. It is estimated right now that 15% [...]... Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:33 PM
  • 1,174 views

Heart disease deaths dropping, but we can do better

by PalMD in White Coat Underground

Sixty years ago,  the world was full of miracles.  Western Europe was recovering from the devastation of World War II, an agricultural revolution promised to banish the fear of starvation in large parts of the world, and the mythical Mad Men era gave Americans a taste of technology-dependent peace and prosperity unlike any in the [...]... Read more »

Hurlburt CW. (1927) THE CARDIAC CRIPPLE. Canadian Medical Association journal, 17(11), 1305-9. PMID: 20316574  

Wijeysundera HC, Machado M, Farahati F, Wang X, Witteman W, van der Velde G, Tu JV, Lee DS, Goodman SG, Petrella R.... (2010) Association of temporal trends in risk factors and treatment uptake with coronary heart disease mortality, 1994-2005. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 303(18), 1841-7. PMID: 20460623  

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:33 PM
  • 932 views

Basic discussion of weight lifting and flexibility

by ABK in Environment and Health

You've probably heard it. “pull yourself under the bar”, “you’re not going down enough” “full range of motion”. Sometimes trainers seem to get aggravated and may end up ignoring masters athletes who don’t respond to their advice. For many the situation is more complex than choosing not to respond.




Coach Bob Takano (l) and Masters Athlete Scott Miller (r) at the 2011 SPLWC Championships

The two most important factors limiting weightlifting ability (here we mean simply ab........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:33 PM
  • 916 views

CrossFit Info: Heat dissipation is key to athletic performance

by ABK in Environment and Health

Work on the effects of heat on athletic performance continues (see earlier post "What are we fighting when we try to push through a challenging workout" for in depth discussion). This is an important area of research for most of us because heat may be the limiting factor in performance. You body will try its best to make you stop exercising when your brain temperature reaches a certain level. Muscle cells will also start to function poorly when they are heat stressed. This is due, in part of........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:33 PM
  • 909 views

What are Obesogens and do I need to worry about them?

by ABK in Environment and Health







Most of this post has appeared on my Environmental Chemicals Blog, which is now being used as an example blog for a Biology course with a Science Blogging component. However, I thought it might be an interesting read for people who, despite eating well and working out like fiends, are still struggling to lean out. It is also a good read for people who want to protect their children, future children or grandkids from metabolic disorders later in life.  Here goes.



Obesity can make ........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:33 PM
  • 790 views

CrossFit and Paleo: Alcohol and Diabetes

by ABK in Environment and Health




From a purely health-oriented perspective, alcohol is one of those things where a little seems to be good and more than a little puts you at risk for a bad health outcome. One of the positive things small regular intake can do for you is protect you from diabetes. There is good epidemiological evidence that this is the case. Light drinkers are less likely to develop diabetes than those who abstain.






As most people know, just because two things occur together does not mean that one c........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:33 PM
  • 992 views

Exercise may protect your jaws and prevent tooth loss.

by ABK in Environment and Health





Exercise, especially weight-bearing exercise, builds bone and protects against osteoporosis and frailty later in life.  Unfortunately, only bone under stress seems to benefit.  For example, runners, who carry their own body weight, tend to have stronger leg bones than cyclists.  CrossFit provides excellent training for bone strength.  It includes weighted movements that target, stress and should strengthen most of the bones in the human body.  That is provided you do........ Read more »

  • December 31, 1969
  • 07:33 PM
  • 860 views

CrossFit and Supplements: What about Leucine?

by ABK in Environment and Health






What is leucine?
Leucine is a branched chain amino acid (bcaa). A lot of people in the CrossFit and Paleo communities are either strongly for it, or strongly against it.   Researchers have identified it as a signal for muscle synthesis in animals. So, there's good a good chance it would do the same in people.   It has been studied as a supplement for humans. A number of these studies have shown increased muscle synthesis and faster recovery in both older and younger men. Wastin........ Read more »

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