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  • April 23, 2015
  • 01:46 AM
  • 157 views

Does maternal asthma 'prime' for offspring neurodevelopmental disorder?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper from Jared Schwartzer and colleagues [1] (open-access) including a couple of familiar names on the authorship list (Charity Onore and Paul Ashwood) caught my attention recently. Based on mouse studies and the artificial induction of maternal allergy/asthma in pregnant mice, researchers reported that: "Activation of the maternal immune system with an allergy/asthma insult significantly perturbed developmental growth and species-typical behaviors in offspring." Further that the........ Read more »

  • April 22, 2015
  • 04:27 PM
  • 117 views

Researchers find genetic link between overactive and underactive immune systems

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In the largest genetic study to date of a challenging immunodeficiency disorder, scientists have identified a gene that may be a “missing link” between overactive and underactive immune activity. The gene candidate also plays a key role in autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and even allergies.... Read more »

Li J, Jørgensen SF, Maggadottir SM, Bakay M, Warnatz K, Glessner J, Pandey R, Salzer U, Schmidt RE, Perez E.... (2015) Association of CLEC16A with human common variable immunodeficiency disorder and role in murine B cells. Nature communications, 6804. PMID: 25891430  

  • April 22, 2015
  • 12:13 PM
  • 138 views

Brain EEG and the Genetics of ADHD

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Twin studies in ADHD demonstrate a significant genetic contribution to the disorder.Linking this genetic influence to specific biomarkers may provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ADHD.Grainne McLoughlin and colleagues at the University of California San Diego and King's College London recently published a twin study of brain EEG and the genetics of ADHD.In their study 67 twin pairs (34 monozygotic and 33 dizygotic) between the ages of 12 and 15 years completed tasks measuring........ Read more »

  • April 22, 2015
  • 07:01 AM
  • 164 views

Hair Plucking Could Treat Baldness

by Geetanjali Yadav in United Academics

Plucking sends out a signal by quorum sensing which leads to a surge of hair re-growth. ... Read more »

Chen CC, Wang L, Plikus MV, Jiang TX, Murray PJ, Ramos R, Guerrero-Juarez CF, Hughes MW, Lee OK, Shi S.... (2015) Organ-level quorum sensing directs regeneration in hair stem cell populations. Cell, 161(2), 277-90. PMID: 25860610  

  • April 22, 2015
  • 04:39 AM
  • 125 views

MMR vaccine was not associated with increased risk of autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"In this large sample of privately insured children with older siblings, receipt of the MMR [measles-mumps-rubella] vaccine was not associated with increased risk of ASD [autism spectrum disorder], regardless of whether older siblings had ASD. These findings indicate no harmful association between MMR vaccine receipt and ASD even among children already at higher risk for ASD."That was the conclusion reached in the study by Anjali Jain and colleagues [1] (open-access) based on........ Read more »

  • April 21, 2015
  • 02:01 PM
  • 103 views

Type 1 diabetes: On the way to an insulin vaccine

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Pseudoscience claims about vaccines are seemingly hitting a fever pitch. Despite that, a new vaccine may be on the horizon for children at risk for diabetes, and that is a good thing. Researchers have found that children at risk for type 1 diabetes, who were given daily doses of oral insulin, developed a protective immune response to the disease that could lay the groundwork for a vaccine against the chronic illness.... Read more »

Ezio Bonifacio, PhD, Anette G. Ziegler, MD, Georgeanna Klingensmith, MD, Edith Schober, MD, Polly J. Bingley, MD, Marietta Rottenkolber, Anke Theil, PhD, Anne Eugster, PhD, Ramona Puff, PhD, Claudia Peplow.... (2015) Effects of High-Dose Oral Insulin on Immune Responses in Children at High Risk for Type 1 Diabetes The Pre-POINT Randomized Clinical Trial. Journal of American Medical Association . info:/10.1001/jama.2015.2928

Jay S. Skyler, MD. (2015) Toward Primary Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes. Journal of American Medical Association . info:/10.1001/jama.2015.2054.

  • April 21, 2015
  • 08:23 AM
  • 96 views

Gout in Living Kidney Donors

by Cristy at Living Donor 101 in Living Donors Are People Too

A recent study indicates that living kidney donors are at a higher risk of gout than non-donors. ” Gout developed in significantly more donors than non-donors (3.4% vs. 2.0%), a difference that translated into a 60% increased risk of gout among living donors” This appears to be due to living kidney donors’ higher serum uric …
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The post Gout in Living Kidney Donors appeared first on Living Donors Are People Too.
... Read more »

Lam N.N., Garg A.X., Segev D.L., Schnitzler M.A., Xiao H., Axelrod D., Brennan D.C., Kasiske B.L., Tuttle-Newhall J.E., & Lentine K.L. (2015) Gout after Living Kidney Donation: Correlations with Demographic Traits and Renal Complications. American Journal of Nephrology, 14(3), 231-240. info:/

  • April 21, 2015
  • 04:31 AM
  • 127 views

Jessica Biesiekierski on non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

It's not often that I dedicate a blog post to a specific individual and their views and opinions on a particular topic. Today however, I'm doing just that to provide you with a link to the paper from Jessica Biesiekierski on the topic of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) [1] (open-access).The reason? Well, aside from being one of the primary protagonists in the research topic of gluten-related ills outside of the autoimmune condition known as coeliac (celiac) disease (itself the to........ Read more »

Biesiekierski, J., & Iven, J. (2015) Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity: piecing the puzzle together. United European Gastroenterology Journal, 3(2), 160-165. DOI: 10.1177/2050640615578388  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 02:23 PM
  • 103 views

Miracle fat-burning hormone doesn't exist after all

by Isabel Torres in Science in the clouds

Scientists are humans, and as such, they can sometimes get carried away when they make a breakthrough discovery. Because of this premature excitement, they may lose attention to detail, over-interpret results, or cut corners to speed up that much-desired Nature publication. The discovery of irisin, or ‘exercise hormone’, is one such example. Once thought to be a promising exercise-free solution for obesity and diabetes, irisin has now been shown to be no more than a random blood protein dete........ Read more »

Albrecht Elke, Bernd Thiede, Torgeir Holen, Tomoo Ohashi, Lisa Schering, Sindre Lee, Julia Brenmoehl, Selina Thomas, Christian A. Drevon, & Harold P. Erickson. (2015) Irisin – a myth rather than an exercise-inducible myokine. Scientific Reports, 8889. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep08889  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 11:39 AM
  • 122 views

The Human Epigenome Roadmap

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

Aside from the occasional somatic mutation, the genome of every cell in an individual’s body is largely preserved. Yet different types of cells (and tissues, and organs) are incredibly diverse. The majority of that specialization is governed by epigenetic changes — histone modifications, DNA accessibility, and methylation — that influence when and how genes are expressed. […]... Read more »

Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium, Kundaje A, Meuleman W, Ernst J, Bilenky M, Yen A, Heravi-Moussavi A, Kheradpour P, Zhang Z, Wang J.... (2015) Integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes. Nature, 518(7539), 317-30. PMID: 25693563  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 11:32 AM
  • 137 views

ADHD and Autism Overlap: Adult Twin Study

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Clinical studies show high rates of ADHD in adults with autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These studies have estimated the prevalence of ADHD in adults with ASD at between 28 and 44% of individuals. The prevalence of ADHD in the adult general population without ASD is estimated at 2.5%.Given the overlap between these two developmental disorders, it makes sense to examine genetic factors that might contribute to co-occurrence.TJC Polderman along with colleagues from the Netherlands, ........ Read more »

  • April 20, 2015
  • 04:51 AM
  • 141 views

Tics are common in adults with autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The title of this post comes from a quote included in the paper by Ursula Kahl and colleagues [1] based on their study of the "phenomenology and characteristics" of tics in adults diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with a small control group of adults with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). A tic by the way, is a "sudden, fast, repeated movement or sound."This is not the first time that tics have been examined with the autism spectrum in mind. The paper from C........ Read more »

Kahl, U., Schunke, O., Schöttle, D., David, N., Brandt, V., Bäumer, T., Roessner, V., Münchau, A., & Ganos, C. (2015) Tic Phenomenology and Tic Awareness in Adults With Autism. Movement Disorders Clinical Practice. DOI: 10.1002/mdc3.12154  

  • April 19, 2015
  • 05:29 PM
  • 163 views

Accepting pain – or are we measuring something else?

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

Acceptance is defined in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) as “a willingness to remain in contact with and to actively experience particular private experiences (Hayes, Jacobson, Follette, Dougher, 1994) (eds): Acceptance and Change: Content and Context in Psychotherapy. Reno, Context Press, 1994), and from this Lance McCracken and colleagues developed the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire. This measure has two dimensions: willingness to experience pain and engaging in values-dir........ Read more »

  • April 19, 2015
  • 01:49 PM
  • 133 views

Botox makes unnerving journey into our nervous system

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

New research might bring a frown to even the most heavily botoxed faces, with scientists finding how some of the potent toxin used for cosmetic surgery escapes into the central nervous system. Researchers have shown how Botox – also known as Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A – is transported via our nerves back to the central nervous system.... Read more »

Wang, T., Martin, S., Papadopulos, A., Harper, C., Mavlyutov, T., Niranjan, D., Glass, N., Cooper-White, J., Sibarita, J., Choquet, D.... (2015) Control of Autophagosome Axonal Retrograde Flux by Presynaptic Activity Unveiled Using Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(15), 6179-6194. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3757-14.2015  

  • April 18, 2015
  • 02:14 PM
  • 163 views

Kids with ADHD must squirm to learn

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

For decades, frustrated parents and teachers have barked at fidgety children with ADHD to “Sit still and concentrate!” But new research shows that if you want ADHD kids to learn, you have to let them squirm. The foot-tapping, leg-swinging and chair-scooting movements of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are actually vital to how they remember information and work out complex cognitive tasks.... Read more »

  • April 18, 2015
  • 05:22 AM
  • 166 views

Autistic traits in adult-onset psychiatric disorders?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"To conclude, the presentation of ALTs [autistic-like traits/symptoms] at the sub-threshold or threshold level may be closely associated with BPD [bipolar disorder] and SZ [schizophrenia]."That was the conclusion reached in the paper by Junko Matsuo and colleagues [1] (open-access here) based on their analysis of nearly 300 adults aged between 25-59 years including those diagnosed with "MDD [major depressive disorder], n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia,&n........ Read more »

Matsuo J, Kamio Y, Takahashi H, Ota M, Teraishi T, Hori H, Nagashima A, Takei R, Higuchi T, Motohashi N.... (2015) Autistic-Like Traits in Adult Patients with Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia. PloS one, 10(4). PMID: 25838109  

  • April 17, 2015
  • 07:47 PM
  • 178 views

Study links brain anatomy, academic achievement, and family income

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Many years of research have shown that for students from lower-income families, standardized test scores and other measures of academic success tend to lag behind those of wealthier students. Well now a new study offers another dimension to this so-called “achievement gap”After imaging the brains of high- and low-income students, they found that the higher-income students had thicker brain cortex in areas associated with visual perception and knowledge accumulation.... Read more »

Allyson Mackey et al. (2015) Students’ Family Income Linked With Brain Anatomy, Academic Achievement. Psychological Science. info:/

  • April 17, 2015
  • 03:56 PM
  • 125 views

Artificial blood vessel lets researchers assess clot removal devices

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

For the first time, researchers have created an in vitro, live-cell artificial vessel that can be used to study both the application and effects of devices used to extract life-threatening blood clots in the brain. The artificial vessel could have significant implications for future development of endovascular technologies, including reducing the need for animal models to test new devices or approaches.... Read more »

  • April 17, 2015
  • 03:52 AM
  • 139 views

Higher cancer mortality rates associated with mental illness

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The findings reported by Steve Kisely and colleagues [1] were of some interest recently and their assertion that despite cancer incidence being "the same as the general population for most psychiatric disorders" or even slightly reduced when a diagnosis of schizophrenia was for example received, mortality due to cancer was "increased in psychiatric patients."Such findings were based on their examination of: "Mental health records [that] were linked with cancer registrations and death r........ Read more »

  • April 16, 2015
  • 02:39 PM
  • 135 views

Could maple syrup help cut use of antibiotics?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Another reason to have those waffles… well maybe. Researchers have found that a concentrated extract of maple syrup makes disease-causing bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics. In an ever increasing antibiotic resistant world, this news is almost as sweet as the syrup (okay no more bad puns). The findings suggest that combining maple syrup extract with common antibiotics could increase the microbes’ susceptibility, leading to lower antibiotic usage.... Read more »

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