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  • February 10, 2011
  • 12:19 AM
  • 1,998 views

Warming Associated Range Shifts – King Crabs in Antarctica

by John Carroll in Chronicles of Zostera



Well I haven’t done a Research Blogging post in a very long time.  But I was inspired by this news release I read today about crabs spilling onto the Antarctic peninsula with warming waters.   On a recent voyage to Antarctica, marine biologists collected digital images of these deep water predators moving closer to shallow coastal . . . → Read More: Warming Associated Range Shifts – King Crabs in Antarctica... Read more »

Aronson, R., Thatje, S., Clarke, A., Peck, L., Blake, D., Wilga, C., & Seibel, B. (2007) Climate Change and Invasibility of the Antarctic Benthos. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, 38(1), 129-154. DOI: 10.1146/annurev.ecolsys.38.091206.095525  

Aronson RB, Moody RM, Ivany LC, Blake DB, Werner JE, & Glass A. (2009) Climate change and trophic response of the Antarctic bottom fauna. PloS one, 4(2). PMID: 19194490  

Thatje, S., Anger, K., Calcagno, J., Lovrich, G., Pörtner, H., & Arntz, W. (2005) CHALLENGING THE COLD: CRABS RECONQUER THE ANTARCTIC. Ecology, 86(3), 619-625. DOI: 10.1890/04-0620  

  • February 9, 2011
  • 10:00 AM
  • 845 views

Competence, Participation, Opportunity in Science Communication

by Janet Krenn in Talking Winston


“…the main concern of community activities is now increasingly about public participation, rather than public competence [of science].”


A recent study in Public Understanding of Science reveals that individuals that report “high” interest in science and technology make up a majority of the members of the general public who participate in science/policy decision making. Yet some that are very interested actually may lack a basic science competence, and what good is any discussion w........ Read more »

  • February 9, 2011
  • 02:29 AM
  • 1,381 views

Transitioning from Trainee to Faculty

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


Wish I had know this before when starting in Academia. Really starting your career after all the training you’ve been through, a real challenge. How to start of on the new job.
Important strategies from the medical literature, management practices and hands on experience for “on-boarding”:

Start early, meaning getting toknow your organisation before your start date. [...]


No related posts.... Read more »

  • February 8, 2011
  • 10:16 PM
  • 1,081 views

Much Ado About ADHD-Research: Is there a Misrepresentation of ADHD in Scientific Journals?

by Laika in Laika's Medliblog

The reliability of science is increasingly under fire. We all know that media often gives a distorted picture of scientific findings (i.e. Hot news: Curry, Curcumin, Cancer & cure). But there is also an ever growing number of scientific misreports or even fraud (see bmj editorial announcing retraction of the Wakefield paper about causal relation beteen MMR vaccination [...]... Read more »

  • February 7, 2011
  • 09:25 PM
  • 807 views

Choice vs Gender Discrimination in Math-Intensive Science

by Michael Long in Phased

Choice, not direct discrimination, explains the current low representation of women in tenure-track, math-intensive, research-based faculty positions.... Read more »

Stephen J. Ceci, & Wendy M. Williams. (2011) Understanding current causes of women’s underrepresentation in science. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. info:/10.1073/pnas.1014871108

  • February 7, 2011
  • 10:54 AM
  • 941 views

Adopt Your Scientific Testimony to Jurors' Skeptical Ears

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

By: Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm - In his recent State of the Union address, President Obama followed the common pattern of giving attention and applause lines to nearly every issue on the national agenda. But there was one issue that received no mention at all: climate change. The absence, noted by many commentators, extended even to areas where it would have been natural to mention the environment. The President's "clean energy" initiative, for example, was touted based on its ability to create jobs and........ Read more »

William R. L. Anderegga, James W. Prallb, Jacob Haroldc, and Stephen H. Schneidera. (2010) Expert credibility in climate change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. info:/

  • February 7, 2011
  • 06:42 AM
  • 648 views

BMC Research Notes launches a new thematic series on data standardization, sharing and publication

by Tara Cronin in BioMed Central Blog

Following our call for contributions to BMC Research Notes on data standards, sharing and publication, the journal and this initiative have received considerable attention from the research community. Today we launch this series of educational articles, as we publish the first of the numerous manuscripts we have received since September.
This new article by Tony Mathys and Maged Boulos gives an overview of the geospatial resources available for the health research community and public health s........ Read more »

  • February 7, 2011
  • 06:00 AM
  • 734 views

Article review: How competent do trainees feel?

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

It is 2 a.m. You, the resident, have just spoken to your staff/attending, who told you to do a task. You have seen one, but don't feel comfortable doing one independently.Will you tell your staff/attending about how you feel? What if the patient did poorly after that?This study examines the perception of EM trainees of their competence and adverse events and how they feel about reporting them.MethodsAnonymous web-based survey sent to all trainees from 9 EM programs in Canada outside Quebe........ Read more »

  • February 6, 2011
  • 09:00 PM
  • 1,511 views

Misrepresentation of ADHD in scientific journals and in the mass media

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

The scientific community often discusses the misrepresentation of health news by the media. A less discussed subject is misrepresentation of data in the scientific literature. Gonon, Bezard and Boraud used their knowledge about ADHD to find misrepresentations of data in scientific literature and mass media, and found that the misrepresentation problem often begins in the scientific literature. 1. Internal inconsistenciesThe good news is that only 2 out of about 360 papers (Barbaresi et al and V........ Read more »

  • February 6, 2011
  • 04:11 PM
  • 676 views

It isn’t just students: Medical researchers aren’t citing previous work either

by bjms1002 in the Undergraduate Science Librarian

One of the things that faculty often complain about is that students don’t adequately track down and cite enough relevant material for their term papers and projects.  This problem isn’t confined to undergraduates.  A study in the January 4, 2011 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine by Karen Robinson and Steven Goodman finds that [...]... Read more »

  • February 1, 2011
  • 01:50 AM
  • 1,505 views

Managing the demands of professional life

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


This is the title of an article recently published and written by a psychiatrist and a cardiac surgeon. It’s about an important question not only for physicians but also for other professionals. I found their answer recognizable for most of their concepts.
In short, it’s about five concepts that can be helpful in the work of [...]


No related posts.... Read more »

Dickey, J., & Ungerleider, R. (2007) Managing the demands of professional life. Cardiology in the Young, 17(S2). DOI: 10.1017/S1047951107001242  

  • January 31, 2011
  • 09:35 PM
  • 492 views

Role of Scientists and the Media in Propagating ADHD Misconceptions

by Michael Long in Phased

Both scientists and the media are to blame for extreme misrepresentations of ADHD neurobiology in the scientific literature and the lay press.... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 03:54 PM
  • 1,064 views

How to be a neuroscientist

by Bradley Voytek in Oscillatory Thoughts

In this post, I will teach you all how to be proper, skeptical neuroscientists. By the end of this post, not only will you be able to spot "neuro nonsense" statements, but you'll also be able to spot nonsense neuroscience questions.I implore my journalist friends to take note of what I say in this post.Much has already been said on the topic of modern neuroimaging masquerading as "new phrenology". A lot of these arguments and conversations are hidden from the lay public, however, so I'm going to........ Read more »

Barres, B. (2010) Neuro Nonsense. PLoS Biology, 8(12). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001005  

Racine E, Bar-Ilan O, & Illes J. (2005) fMRI in the public eye. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 6(2), 159-64. PMID: 15685221  

Editors. (2004) Brain scam?. Nature Neuroscience, 7(7), 683-683. DOI: 10.1038/nn0704-683  

Weisberg, D., Keil, F., Goodstein, J., Rawson, E., & Gray, J. (2008) The Seductive Allure of Neuroscience Explanations. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 20(3), 470-477. DOI: 10.1162/jocn.2008.20040  

Young, M., Hilgetag, C., & Scannell, J. (2000) On imputing function to structure from the behavioural effects of brain lesions. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 355(1393), 147-161. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2000.0555  

  • January 31, 2011
  • 06:00 AM
  • 919 views

Article Review: Morbidity and Mortality Conferences in EM

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

Residency training programs are required to have Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) Conferences, as mandated by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). These conferences were originally designed to look at medical errors and unforeseen complications in patient care.Traditionally, Surgery programs focus on medical error and complications in their conferences. In contrast, Internal Medicine programs tend to focus more on cases because of their intrinsic learning value. Erro........ Read more »

Seigel, T., McGillicuddy, D., Barkin, A., & Rosen, C. (2010) Morbidity and Mortality Conference in Emergency Medicine. The Journal of Emergency Medicine, 38(4), 507-511. DOI: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2008.09.018  

  • January 30, 2011
  • 09:05 AM
  • 1,265 views

Writerly scientist derided scientist-writer?

by Jeremy Yoder in Denim and Tweed

Following up on the recent discovery that novelist and lepidopterist Vladimir Nabokov correctly supposed that Polyommatus blue butterflies colonized the New World in stages, Jessica Palmer points out that none other than Stephen Jay Gould dismissed Nabokov's scientific work as not up to the same standards of genius exhibited in his novels. She suggests that Nabokov's work may have been dismissed by his contemporaries because his scientific papers were a little too colorfully written.Roger Vila, ........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2011
  • 06:24 PM
  • 640 views

Premature Brain Diagnosis in Japan?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

Nature has a disturbing article from their Asian correspondent David Cyranoski: Thought experiment. It's open access.In brief: a number of top Japanese psychiatrists have started offering a neuroimaging method called NIRS to their patients as a diagnostic tool. They claim that NIRS shows the neural signatures of different mental illnesses.The technology was approved by the Japanese authorities in April 2009, and since then it's been used on at least 300 patients, who pay $160 for the privilege. ........ Read more »

Cyranoski, D. (2011) Neuroscience: Thought experiment. Nature, 469(7329), 148-149. DOI: 10.1038/469148a  

  • January 28, 2011
  • 12:35 PM
  • 586 views

Will the uprising in the Middle East & North Africa usher in a new era of science and innovation in the Arab world?

by Farooq Khan in Complex systems + science

The wave of protests sweeping across the Middle East and North Africa has been described as revolutionary. Whether this is an accurate description of what is taking place remains to be seen, and depends upon how you define a revolution....... Read more »

Farooq Khan. (2011) Will the uprising in the Middle East . Nature Blogs. info:/

  • January 27, 2011
  • 08:13 PM
  • 1,045 views

Language learning and height

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Are you tall enough to learn English? Have you ever reflected on the relationship between height and language learning? Well, I haven’t, and I’ve been in language teaching and learning for almost 20 years. So, I assume that most of … Continue reading →... Read more »

Chang, Leslie T. (2009) Factory Girls: From Village to City in a Changing China. Spiegel . info:/

  • January 27, 2011
  • 10:30 AM
  • 1,154 views

Legal Protections for Working Women in US Law Might Have Been a Joke

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

In a fascinating article in the Industrial-Organizational Psychologist, Scott Highhouse[1] discusses why legal protections provided to women under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 might have been included by lawmakers as a joke – or more specifically, as a way to make the bill so ridiculous that it would not pass a [...]


Some related articles on Neo-Academic:The Right to Internet Access
... Read more »

Highhouse, S. (2011) The history corner: Was the addition of sex to Title VII a joke? Two viewpoints. . The Industrial-Organizational Psychologist, 48(3), 102-107. info:/

  • January 27, 2011
  • 07:33 AM
  • 816 views

the linguistics of heaven and hell

by Chris in The Lousy Linguist

The value of pop culture data for legitimate research is being put to the test. Exactly what, if anything, can the reality show Big Brother tell us about language change over time?Voice Onset Time is a measure of how long you wait to begin vibrating your vocal folds after you release a stop consonant. Voiced stop consonants like /b/ and /d/ require two things: 1) stop all airflow from escaping the airway by closing the glottis and 2) after the air is released, begin vibrating the glottis (by usi........ Read more »

Max Ban, Peter Graf, & Morgan Sonderegge. (2011) Longitudinal phonetic variation in a closed system. Linguistic Society of America. info:/

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