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  • May 27, 2011
  • 07:59 AM
  • 842 views

Good things come in pairs: mothers of twins “naturally healthier” than other women

by James Brooks in Elements Science

Mining the historical records in the US state of Utah has yielded a link between innate healthiness, longevity and double births, reports James Brooks



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  • May 27, 2011
  • 06:00 AM
  • 1,036 views

Paucis Verbis: Outpatient treatment for diverticulitis

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

The classic teaching for the treatment of diverticulitis includes:Hospital admissionBowel rest (NPO)IV fluidsBroad spectrum IV antibioticsDo ALL patients need to be admitted? There is some early literature suggesting that there is a small sub-population who fare well with outpatient treatment.This article from Annals of EM in the "Best Available Evidence" series summarizes the existing literature well. Plus, I was one of the journal reviewers for the article and am thrilled to see this coming ou........ Read more »

  • May 25, 2011
  • 12:15 PM
  • 1,786 views

Palawan’s fauna 14,000 to 5,000 (cal) years before present

by nath in Imprints of Philippine Science

An accounting of the fauna of the island of Palawan (Philippines) 14,000 to 5,000 years before present.... Read more »

Piper, P., Ochoa, J., Robles, E., Lewis, H., & Paz, V. (2011) Palaeozoology of Palawan Island, Philippines. Quaternary International, 233(2), 142-158. DOI: 10.1016/j.quaint.2010.07.009  

  • May 25, 2011
  • 09:28 AM
  • 433 views

Poland’s doctors earn £65million a year for illegal abortions

by James Brooks in Elements Science

Abortion is illegal in Poland and, as a recent report shows, doctors benefit financially from this situation. James Brooks reports.



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  • May 25, 2011
  • 04:55 AM
  • 576 views

Camouflage in the eyes of the beholder

by Jennifer Appleton in Elements Science

An animal’s ability to camouflage itself is a practical defence, but as Jennifer Appleton finds out, their technique isn’t always flawless.... Read more »

Chiao CC, Wickiser JK, Allen JJ, Genter B, & T Hanlon R. (2011) Hyperspectral imaging of cuttlefish camouflage indicates good color match in the eyes of fish predators. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 21576487  

  • May 24, 2011
  • 07:00 PM
  • 1,393 views

Motion, Theme, and a Human Face

by Paige Brown in From The Lab Bench

Lessons for a Science Writer from a New York Times Editor's Field Notes on Nonfiction Writing

I recently picked up Francis Flaherty's The Elements of Story in my campus bookstore, as I was browsing and drinking my third cup of coffee in between experiments. Turns out, I made an excellent choice from among those titles I randomly picked off the "Books about Books" shelf. I'm already an impulsive book buyer.... The quote from Library Journal on the cover, "An essen........ Read more »

Editorial. (2010) Science scorned. Nature, 467(7312), 133. PMID: 20829750  

  • May 24, 2011
  • 01:27 PM
  • 727 views

The Science of Beauty

by Abi Millar in Elements Science

From parasite resistance to the golden ratio – Abi Millar examines the science behind what is considered ‘beautiful’.



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  • May 24, 2011
  • 04:16 AM
  • 764 views

‘Guilty’ Dog look, all in the owners imagination

by Jennifer Appleton in Elements Science

Jennifer Appleton reports on how even the most innocent of dogs will get the blame for giving a look which is all in the owners mind.



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  • May 23, 2011
  • 02:00 PM
  • 658 views

How to mend a broken heart: nanotechnology offers new hope for heart attack sufferers

by Richard Masters in Elements Science

Scientists have developed a patch that could help those suffering from damaged hearts, reports Richard Masters



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  • May 23, 2011
  • 12:48 PM
  • 676 views

Younger doctors prescribe more heart drugs to no apparent benefit

by James Brooks in Elements Science

James Brooks looks at an Italian study that shows younger medics are less inclined to give lifestyle advice to heart patients than more experienced colleagues



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  • May 23, 2011
  • 08:31 AM
  • 720 views

Earthquake prediction: fact or fiction?

by Michael Jones in Elements Science

Accurate prediction of hazards saves millions of lives and billions of dollars each year, but as Michael Jones reports, this isn’t always easy.



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  • May 23, 2011
  • 02:53 AM
  • 1,441 views

Blue Lights Shown to Give a Brain Boost! But is a Better than Coffee?

by Stuart Farrimond in Dr Stu's Science Blog

It’s 6 am and the alarm sounds. Mornings aren’t a friendly place until you’ve had a coffee. Loathed by some but loved by many more, caffienated drinks are the world’s most popular drug. Effective as a stimulant, a mood-booster and an learning-enhancer, caffeine is an indispensable part of modern-day living for 90% of Westerners. Coffee … Continue reading »... Read more »

Vandewalle, G., Maquet, P., & Dijk, D. (2009) Light as a modulator of cognitive brain function. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 13(10), 429-438. DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2009.07.004  

Lehrl, S., Gerstmeyer, K., Jacob, J., Frieling, H., Henkel, A., Meyrer, R., Wiltfang, J., Kornhuber, J., & Bleich, S. (2007) Blue light improves cognitive performance. Journal of Neural Transmission, 114(4), 457-460. DOI: 10.1007/s00702-006-0621-4  

Smith, A. (2002) Effects of caffeine on human behavior. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 40(9), 1243-1255. DOI: 10.1016/S0278-6915(02)00096-0  

  • May 21, 2011
  • 10:13 PM
  • 1,165 views

Life, Death, and Silver Bullets

by Paige Brown in From The Lab Bench

A Science Fiction story about the Age of the Superbug

There was something about her... a pale, reddish complexion, so rare these days... all the other desks in the dull classroom where occupied by students who faded together in their blue and gray hues... who snuck furtive glances at the ruddy newcomer, in her bright blue overalls and frizzy, untamed hair.
... Read more »

Patterson, J. (2010) Rising plague. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 120(3), 649-649. DOI: 10.1172/JCI42104  

  • May 20, 2011
  • 11:12 PM
  • 1,428 views

You're just a number: introduction to the h-index

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Measuring a single scientist's output has always been problematic. Why? First, in order for the statistics to be reliable, the scientist has to produce a considerable publication output and get cited. That takes time. Second, measures like research productivity, number of publications and citations don't always correlates. Measuring the output of journals and universities has been far more reliable than measuring that of one person. Suggested by physicist Jorge Hirsch, h-index (2005) offers an ........ Read more »

  • May 20, 2011
  • 03:28 PM
  • 772 views

The 9,000-year-old La Jolla Fisherman and -woman

by Kristina Killgrove in Powered By Osteons

Who owns the past, and who should have a say in the disposition of Palaeoindian skeletons?... Read more »

Dalton R. (2008) No burial for 10,000-year-old bones. Nature, 455(7217), 1156-7. PMID: 18971985  

Dalton R. (2009) Scientists in bone battle. Nature, 458(7236), 265. PMID: 19295571  

Schoeninger MJ, Bada JL, Masters PM, Bettinger RL, & White TD. (2011) Unexamined bodies of evidence. Science (New York, N.Y.), 332(6032), 916. PMID: 21596975  

  • May 20, 2011
  • 06:00 AM
  • 814 views

Paucis Verbis: International Registry on Aortic Dissection (IRAD)

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

What do these three people have in common? Lucille Ball (comedienne)Jonathan Larson (wrote the musical "Rent")John Ritter (comedian)They all died from an aortic dissection. We commonly consider this diagnosis for Emergency Department patients presenting with severe chest pain. There is an International Registry on Aortic Dissection which published a retrospective, descriptive study of 464 patients with aortic dissections.I find this list helpful, because it illustrates the fact that the cla........ Read more »

  • May 20, 2011
  • 06:00 AM
  • 827 views

Paucis Verbis: International Registry on Aortic Dissection (IRAD)

by Michelle Lin in Academic Life In Emergency Medicine

What do these three people have in common? Lucille Ball (comedienne)Jonathan Larson (wrote the musical "Rent")John Ritter (comedian)They all died from an aortic dissection. We commonly consider this diagnosis for Emergency Department patients presenting with severe chest pain. There is an International Registry on Aortic Dissection which published a retrospective, descriptive study of 464 patients with aortic dissections.I find this list helpful, because it illustrates the fact that the cla........ Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 12:00 PM
  • 1,438 views

Full Text And Details For Nature Letter “Data Archiving Is A Good Investment”

by Heather Piwowar in Research Remix

We hope publishing the argument in this high-visibility venue will inspire hallway conversations amongst scientists and influence how they view long-term data archive funding. Particularly those scientists who also wear hats in funding agencies!... Read more »

Piwowar, HA, Vision, TJ, & Whitlock, MC. (2011) Data archiving is a good investment. Nature, 473(7347), 285-285. DOI: 10.1038/473285a  

Piwowar HA, Vision TJ, & Whitlock MC. (2011) Data from: Data archiving is a good investment. Dryad Digital Repository. info:/10.5061/dryad.j1fd7

  • May 19, 2011
  • 09:32 AM
  • 1,083 views

Cultural Ontogeny Recapitulates Phylogeny

by Samuel Arbesman in arbesman.net

In evolutionary biology, there is a now-discredited idea that “ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny.” In other words, the development of an organism follows its evolutionary history. Human embryos look like they have gills because people evolved from fish, we have tails in utero because of the same origins, and so forth. In a recent paper in PLoS [...]... Read more »

  • May 17, 2011
  • 05:51 PM
  • 1,332 views

Are Wind Turbines Ugly? New Research gives Answers…

by Stuart Farrimond in Dr Stu's Science Blog

For many of us, Wind Turbines symbolise hope. The image of a slowly rotating wind turbine on a blue sky represents a rose-tinted future where energy is abundant and free; global warming has been conquered (and bunnies leap gaily around fields). But who would really want to live near a wind farm? We long for … Continue reading »... Read more »

Frantál, B., & Kunc, J. (2011) Wind turbines in tourism landscapes. Annals of Tourism Research, 38(2), 499-519. DOI: 10.1016/j.annals.2010.10.007  

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