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  • July 30, 2015
  • 01:55 PM
  • 0 views

Paralyzed men move legs with new non-invasive spinal cord stimulation

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back.... Read more »

Gerasimenko, Y., Lu, D., Modaber, M., Zdunowski, S., Gad, P., Sayenko, D., Morikawa, E., Haakana, P., Ferguson, A., Roy, R.... (2015) Noninvasive Reactivation of Motor Descending Control after Paralysis. Journal of Neurotrauma, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1089/neu.2015.4008  

  • July 29, 2015
  • 08:08 PM
  • 21 views

We can build it better: The first artificial ribosome

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University have engineered a tethered ribosome that works nearly as well as the authentic cellular component, or organelle, that produces all the proteins and enzymes within the cell. The engineered ribosome may enable the production of new drugs and next-generation biomaterials and lead to a better understanding of how ribosomes function.... Read more »

Orelle, C., Carlson, E., Szal, T., Florin, T., Jewett, M., & Mankin, A. (2015) Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature14862  

  • July 29, 2015
  • 07:48 PM
  • 16 views

Prostate cancer is 5 different diseases

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Cancer Research UK scientists have for the first time identified that there are five distinct types of prostate cancer and found a way to distinguish between them, according to a landmark study. The findings could have important implications for how doctors treat prostate cancer in the future, by identifying tumours that are more likely to grow and spread aggressively through the body.... Read more »

  • July 29, 2015
  • 02:09 PM
  • 31 views

The “Invisible Web” Undermines Health Information Privacy

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

What do the third parties do with your data? We do not really know because the laws and regulations are rather fuzzy here. We do know that Google, Facebook and Twitter primarily make money by advertising so they could potentially use your info and customize the ads you see. Just because you visited a page on breast cancer does not mean that the "Invisible Web" knows your name and address but they do know that you have some interest in breast cancer. It would make financial sense to sen........ Read more »

  • July 28, 2015
  • 03:01 PM
  • 53 views

Ciência e Saúde Coletiva dedicates issue on the importance of Brazilian Collective Health journals

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The journal Ciência e Saúde Coletiva celebrates 20 years of uninterrupted publication and relevant contribution to national, regional and international Public and Collective Health. The July 2015 thematic issue celebrates the most relevant Brazilian publications and provides an overview of the development of the area, which scientifically supported the construction the Brazil’s Unified Health System - SUS. … Read More →... Read more »

Carvalho, M., Coeli, C., & Travassos, C. (2015) Uma breve história de Cadernos de Saúde Pública. Ciência , 20(7), 2007-2012. DOI: 10.1590/1413-81232015207.05882015  

Martins, C., Ribeiro, H., Alvarenga, A., & Carvalheiro, J. (2015) Saúde e Sociedade: parceria e abertura para novas abordagens. Ciência , 20(7), 2069-2080. DOI: 10.1590/1413-81232015207.06042015  

  • July 28, 2015
  • 01:35 PM
  • 48 views

Where memory is encoded and retrieved

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Are the same regions and even the same cells of the brain area called hippocampus involved in encoding and retrieving memories or are different areas of this structure engaged? This question has kept neuroscientists busy for a long time. Researchers at the Mercator Research Group “Structure of Memory” at RUB have now found out that the same brain cells exhibit activity in both processes.... Read more »

  • July 27, 2015
  • 02:49 PM
  • 71 views

Some vaccines support evolution of more-virulent viruses

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Scientific experiments with the herpes virus such as the one that causes Marek’s disease in poultry have confirmed, for the first time, the highly controversial theory that some vaccines could allow more-virulent versions of a virus to survive, putting unvaccinated individuals at greater risk of severe illness. The research has important implications for food-chain security and food-chain economics, as well as for other diseases that affect humans and agricultural animals.... Read more »

Andrew F. Read, Susan J. Baigent, Claire Powers, Lydia B. Kgosana, Luke Blackwell, Lorraine P. Smith, David A. Kennedy, Stephen W. Walkden-Brown, & Venugopal K. Nair. (2015) Imperfect Vaccination Can Enhance the Transmission of Highly Virulent Pathogens. PLOS Biology. info:/10.1371/journal.pbio.1002198

  • July 26, 2015
  • 07:39 PM
  • 91 views

Sleep not just protects memories against forgetting, it also makes them more accessible

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Sleeping not only protects memories from being forgotten, it also makes them easier to access, according to new research from the University of Exeter and the Basque Centre for Cognition, Brain and Language. The findings suggest that after sleep we are more likely to recall facts which we could not remember while still awake.... Read more »

Dumay, N. (2015) Sleep not just protects memories against forgetting, it also makes them more accessible. Cortex. info:/http://hdl.handle.net/10871/17864

  • July 26, 2015
  • 03:12 PM
  • 65 views

Cell phone notifications may be driving you to distraction

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Whether you are alerted to an incoming phone call or text by a trendy ringtone, an alarm bell or a quiet vibration, just receiving a notification on your cell phone can cause enough of a distraction to impair your ability to focus on a given task. In fact, the distraction caused by a simple notification — whether it is a sound or a vibration — is comparable to the effects seen when users actively use their cell phones to make calls or send text messages, the researchers found.... Read more »

Stothart, C., Mitchum, A., & Yehnert, C. (2015) The Attentional Cost of Receiving a Cell Phone Notification. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. DOI: 10.1037/xhp0000100  

  • July 25, 2015
  • 01:17 PM
  • 88 views

Spines of boys and girls differ at birth

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Looking at measurements of the vertebrae – the series of small bones that make up the spinal column – in newborn children, investigators at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles found that differences between the sexes are present at birth. Results of the study suggest that this difference is evolutionary, allowing the female spine to adapt to the fetal load during pregnancy.... Read more »

Ponrartana, S., Aggabao, P., Dharmavaram, N., Fisher, C., Friedlich, P., Devaskar, S., & Gilsanz, V. (2015) Sexual Dimorphism in Newborn Vertebrae and Its Potential Implications. The Journal of Pediatrics, 167(2), 416-421. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.04.078  

  • July 24, 2015
  • 02:21 PM
  • 109 views

Brain structure reveals ability to regulate emotions

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

We all vary in how often we become happy, sad or angry, and also in how strongly these emotions are expressed. This variability is a part of our personality and can be seen as a positive aspect that increases diversity in society. However, there are people that find it so difficult to regulate their emotions that it has a serious impact on their work, family and social life. These individuals may be given an emotional instability diagnosis such as borderline personality disorder or antisocial pe........ Read more »

Petrovic, P., Ekman, C., Klahr, J., Tigerstrom, L., Ryden, G., Johansson, A., Sellgren, C., Golkar, A., Olsson, A., Ohman, A.... (2015) Significant gray matter changes in a region of the orbitofrontal cortex in healthy participants predicts emotional dysregulation. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsv072  

  • July 23, 2015
  • 02:33 PM
  • 109 views

Body fat can send signals to brain, affecting stress response

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The brain’s effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group of researchers has found that it’s a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism. While the exact nature of those signals remains a mystery, researchers say simply knowing such a pathway exists and learning more about it could help break a vicious cycle: Stress causes a desire to eat more, which can lead to obesity. And too much extra fat can im........ Read more »

de Kloet, A., Krause, E., Solomon, M., Flak, J., Scott, K., Kim, D., Myers, B., Ulrich-Lai, Y., Woods, S., Seeley, R.... (2015) Adipocyte glucocorticoid receptors mediate fat-to-brain signaling. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 110-119. DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2015.03.008  

  • July 22, 2015
  • 09:36 PM
  • 79 views

Using low-dose irradiation, researchers can now edit human genes

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

For the first time, researchers have employed a gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair patient cells. This method, developed by researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, is 10 times more effective than techniques currently in use.... Read more »

Hatada, S., Subramanian, A., Mandefro, B., Ren, S., Kim, H., Tang, J., Funari, V., Baloh, R., Sareen, D., Arumugaswami, V.... (2015) Low-Dose Irradiation Enhances Gene Targeting in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells. Stem Cells Translational Medicine. DOI: 10.5966/sctm.2015-0050  

  • July 22, 2015
  • 12:33 PM
  • 76 views

Static synapses on a moving structure: Mind the gap!

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In biology, stability is important. From body temperature to blood pressure and sugar levels, our body ensures that these remain within reasonable limits and do not reach potentially damaging extremes. Neurons in the brain are no different and, in fact, have developed a number of ways to stabilise their electrical activity so as to avoid becoming either overexcitable, potentially leading to epilepsy, or not excitable enough, leading to non functional neurons.... Read more »

  • July 21, 2015
  • 03:43 PM
  • 75 views

Drawing a line between quantum and classical world

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Quantum theory is one of the great achievements of 20th century science, yet physicists have struggled to find a clear boundary between our everyday world and what Albert Einstein called the “spooky” features of the quantum world, including cats that could be both alive and dead, and photons that can communicate with each other across space instantaneously.... Read more »

  • July 21, 2015
  • 01:24 PM
  • 67 views

Watch Out for the Experienced Study Participant

by amikulak in Daily Observations

When conducting psychology studies online or in the lab, researchers might not think about participants’ past experiences as a research subject. But research published in Psychological Science suggests that these […]... Read more »

Chandler, J., Paolacci, G., Peer, E., Mueller, P., & Ratliff, K. (2015) Using Nonnaive Participants Can Reduce Effect Sizes. Psychological Science, 26(7), 1131-1139. DOI: 10.1177/0956797615585115  

  • July 20, 2015
  • 12:48 PM
  • 89 views

Research investigates whether solar events could trigger birth defects on Earth

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Studies find airplane crews at high altitude are exposed to potentially harmful levels of radiation from cosmic rays. But could these cosmic rays pose hazards even at sea level? In recent years, research has suggested congenital birth defects down on Earth’s surface could be caused by these “solar particle events” — spikes in cosmic rays from the sun that touch off the northern lights and sometimes hamper communications or the electric power grid.... Read more »

  • July 19, 2015
  • 12:44 PM
  • 91 views

Dead galaxies in Coma Cluster may be packed with dark matter

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Galaxies in a cluster roughly 300 million light years from Earth could contain as much as 100 times more dark matter than visible matter, according to an Australian study. The research, published today, used powerful computer simulations to study galaxies that have fallen into the Coma Cluster, one of the largest structures in the Universe in which thousands of galaxies are bound together by gravity.... Read more »

Cameron Yozin et al. (2015) The quenching and survival of ultra-diffuse galaxies in the Coma cluster. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. info:/10.1093/mnras/stv1073

  • July 18, 2015
  • 12:43 PM
  • 109 views

Study finds metal foams capable of shielding X-rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Research from North Carolina State University shows that lightweight composite metal foams are effective at blocking X-rays, gamma rays and neutron radiation, and are capable of absorbing the energy of high impact collisions. The finding means the metal foams hold promise for use in nuclear safety, space exploration and medical technology applications.... Read more »

  • July 17, 2015
  • 01:46 PM
  • 116 views

Cholesterol metabolism in immune cells linked to HIV progression, may lead to new therapy

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Enhanced cholesterol metabolism in certain immune cells may help some people infected with HIV naturally control disease progression, according to new research. The findings provide a basis for potential development of new approaches to control HIV infection by regulating cellular cholesterol metabolism.... Read more »

Rappocciolo, G., Jais, M., Piazza, P., Reinhart, T., Berendam, S., Garcia-Exposito, L., Gupta, P., & Rinaldo, C. (2014) Alterations in Cholesterol Metabolism Restrict HIV-1 Trans Infection in Nonprogressors. mBio, 5(3). DOI: 10.1128/mBio.01031-13  

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