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  • December 18, 2014
  • 11:22 PM
  • 60 views

Top 4 of 2014: Your Favourite Canine Science Posts

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

As December rolls into its second half, and the days warm up - or cool down - depending on where you are situated on the globe, we wanted to say thank you for joining us in 2014 - we are continually blown away with the popular and supportive community we have around us at Do You Believe in Dog? here on the blog, on Facebook and also on Twitter. Taking our lead from Companion Animal Psychology, we decided to jump into some statistics (because hey, we are scientists!) to see wh........ Read more »

Wong-Parodi Gabrielle, & Strauss Benjamin H. (2014) Team science for science communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25225381  

  • December 18, 2014
  • 08:51 AM
  • 45 views

Happy Holidays: Gifts for the Deceased in Anglo-Saxon England

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

The holiday season is upon us, and that means that many of us are thinking about gifts. As I’ve been wrapping the presents I’ve bought for my family, I’ve been […]... Read more »

  • December 17, 2014
  • 11:00 AM
  • 15 views

What is the difference between the GAE and the VL hypotheisis?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Today a commentary was published in BBS in which the gradual audiomotor evolution (GAE) hypothesis is proposed as an alternative interpretation to the auditory timing mechanisms discussed in the BBS target article by Ackermann et al. (2014). ... Read more »

Merchant, H., & Honing, H. (2013) Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 7(274). info:/

  • December 16, 2014
  • 11:38 AM
  • 14 views

Spying on Animals' Movements to Learn How They're Feeling

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Rory Wilson recalls some nervous waterbirds.

"I've seen pelicans in Galapagos, in the port," the Swansea University biologist says. One set of birds was standing by the fish-gutting area and waiting for scraps, while another group stood out of the fray in some nearby bushes. Although both sets of pelicans acted the same, a closer look at the birds waiting for fish scraps revealed that they were quaking slightly. The tips of their wings trembled.

Wilson thinks the tremor in the pelicans... Read more »

Wilson, R., Grundy, E., Massy, R., Soltis, J., Tysse, B., Holton, M., Cai, Y., Parrott, A., Downey, L., Qasem, L.... (2014) Wild state secrets: ultra-sensitive measurement of micro-movement can reveal internal processes in animals. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 12(10), 582-587. DOI: 10.1890/140068  

  • December 11, 2014
  • 11:15 PM
  • 133 views

The Male Idiot Theory

by Shelly Fan in Neurorexia

Image credits: bilbypdalgyte.deviantart.com Yes, that’s a thing. According to hospital emergency departments and mortality stats, men are far likelier than women to experience accidental and sporting injuries, as well as...... Read more »

Ben Alexander, Daniel Lendrem, Dennis William Lendrem, Andy Gray, & John Dudley Isaacs. (2014) The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour. BMJ, 349. info:/Ben Alexander Daniel Lendrem Dennis William Lendrem Andy Gray John Dudley Isaacs

  • December 11, 2014
  • 02:32 PM
  • 73 views

The Headless Romans: Headhunting, Defeated Gladiators or Natural River Movement?

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

In the Walbrook Valley near the city of London, large numbers of human remains, dating to the Roman occupation of England, have been recovered over the past 175 years- and […]... Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:37 AM
  • 27 views

Are Poetry and Psychosis Linked?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Is there a relationship between poetry and psychosis?

The idea that 'genius' is just one step removed from 'madness' is a venerable one, and psychiatrists and psychologists have spent a great (perhaps an inordinate) amount of time looking for correlations between mental illness and creativity.

Now a new British study has examined whether poets exhibit more traits of psychosis than other people. One of the authors is a published poet, Helen Mort.



The researchers recruited 294 poets i... Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:00 AM
  • 76 views

Without it no music?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

A short entry to announce a theme issue on Musicality in Philosophical Transactions B, to be out in February 2015... the year when the worlds first journal dedicated to science will celebrate its 350th anniversary.... Read more »

Honing H, ten Cate C, Peretz I, & Trehub SE. (2015) Without it no music: cognition, biology and evolution of musicality. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B. info:/10.1098/rstb.2014.0088

  • December 10, 2014
  • 07:20 AM
  • 67 views

At Arm's Length

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Ethnographic research on how older adults use activity to keep their diseases at arm's length.... Read more »

  • December 8, 2014
  • 06:50 PM
  • 72 views

Don't miss out! Dogs Science from November

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Catch up! Participate! Plan your conferences for 2015! Check out all the latest in canine science from November here, thanks to the magic of Storify (if you don't see a beautiful array of handy snippets below, please click this link to view)[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [01-30 November 2014]" on Storify]Further reading: Cobb M., Paul McGreevy, Alan Lill & Pauleen Bennett (2014). The advent of canine performance science: Offering a sustainable future for working dogs, Behaviour........ Read more »

  • December 4, 2014
  • 05:52 PM
  • 114 views

Lost in bilingual parenting

by Shiva Motaghi Tabari in Language on the Move

It is not unusual for bilingual parents to experience a sense of bewilderment when it comes to language choice in the family. When raising a child in a language different from the one parents were socialised into, old truths and … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 3, 2014
  • 09:03 AM
  • 131 views

Where do Vampires come from? Isotopic Analysis of the Drawsko Vampires

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

Vampires have continued to be a hot topic in studies of deviant burial practices, and the popular news is more than happy to share these types of archaeological finds. Of […]... Read more »

  • December 1, 2014
  • 02:37 AM
  • 107 views

The Evidence from DNA in the Southwest

by teofilo in Gambler's House

Having introduced the basics of archaeological use of DNA evidence, and discussed some other applications of DNA studies in archaeology, let’s take a look at the data relevant to the Southwest specifically. For modern populations in North America overall, there are some broad trends that have been identified in mitochondrial haplogroup distribution by region, as […]... Read more »

Carlyle SW, Parr RL, Hayes MG, & O'Rourke DH. (2000) Context of maternal lineages in the Greater Southwest. American journal of physical anthropology, 113(1), 85-101. PMID: 10954622  

Smith DG, Malhi RS, Eshleman J, Lorenz JG, & Kaestle FA. (1999) Distribution of mtDNA haplogroup X among Native North Americans. American journal of physical anthropology, 110(3), 271-84. PMID: 10516561  

Snow, M., Durand, K., & Smith, D. (2010) Ancestral Puebloan mtDNA in context of the greater southwest. Journal of Archaeological Science, 37(7), 1635-1645. DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2010.01.024  

  • November 29, 2014
  • 10:23 PM
  • 117 views

Global Warming Denial: What Does it Take? A Case Study of Climate Change Denialists

by Nick in How to Paint Your Panda

Despite the established scientific consensus on global climate change, a substantial number of people, specifically Americans, deny its effects or its taking place. Why does this form of denialism persist so feverishly? What can mitigate this gap between the scientific community and the public?... Read more »

Finucane, M., Slovic, P., Mertz, C., Flynn, J., & Satterfield, T. (2000) Gender, race, and perceived risk: The 'white male' effect. Health, Risk , 2(2), 159-172. DOI: 10.1080/713670162  

Hamilton, L., & Keim, B. (2009) Regional variation in perceptions about climate change. International Journal of Climatology, 29(15), 2348-2352. DOI: 10.1002/joc.1930  

Kahan, D., Peters, E., Wittlin, M., Slovic, P., Ouellette, L., Braman, D., & Mandel, G. (2012) The polarizing impact of science literacy and numeracy on perceived climate change risks. Nature Climate Change, 2(10), 732-735. DOI: 10.1038/nclimate1547  

  • November 28, 2014
  • 10:54 AM
  • 138 views

Ancient human genomes suggest three ancestral populations for present-day Europeans

by Mila Pajkovic in genome ecology evolution etc

Introduction & Methods The demographic history of the human species has always fascinated us. It is known that the ancestral human lineage appeared in East Africa, and that it subsequently migrated out of Africa towards Eurasia, separating into distinct lineages … Continue reading →... Read more »

Lazaridis, I., Patterson, N., Mittnik, A., Renaud, G., Mallick, S., Kirsanow, K., Sudma..lsate, D., Francken, M., Guinet, J., Wahl, J.... (2014) Ancient human genomes suggest three ancestral populations for present-day Europeans. Nature, 513(7518), 409-413. DOI: 10.1038/nature13673  

  • November 26, 2014
  • 07:37 AM
  • 133 views

A Sex Researcher At A Furry Convention

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A report in the journal Archives of Sexual Behaviour describes an unusual field trip made by Canadian researcher Debra W. Soh – to a furry convention, expecting to witness some kind of sexual free-for-all (or free-fur-all). Soh opens by saying that I couldn’t wait to meet a furry, someone who adopts the identity or persona […]The post A Sex Researcher At A Furry Convention appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Soh DW, & Cantor JM. (2014) A Peek Inside a Furry Convention. Archives of Sexual Behavior. PMID: 25408500  

  • November 23, 2014
  • 02:09 PM
  • 141 views

Love, it’s in your genes

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Most kids worry about passing tests, winning games, lost phones, fractured bones—and whether or not they will ever really fall in love. While the first few things are of relatively low value in the scientific pursuit, three Chinese researchers have focused on that last question. All in a bid to find out some of the more interesting questions about our genes: Why do some students stay single? What factors determine if a young adult falls in love?... Read more »

  • November 16, 2014
  • 08:05 PM
  • 115 views

Canine science catch up: 16-30 September 2014

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Gosh, it's been a busy ride since posting the excellent guest post by research, Cat Reeve, about her interesting detector dog research.  So now it's time to play catch up, starting with the canine science related things that we noticed in the second half of September, captured with the help of Storify - did you miss any of these?[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [16 - 30 September 2014]" on Storify]Further reading (some of the abstracts from Canine Science Forum 2014 now available):We........ Read more »

Westgarth Carri, & Hayley E. Christian. (2014) How can we motivate owners to walk their dogs more?. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.023  

Horowitz Alexandra, & Hecht Julie . (2014) Categories and consequences of dog-human play: A citizen science approach. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.052  

Browne Clare M., T. Mary Foster, & James S. McEwan. (2014) Dog training: Reinforcement timing and owner body language. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.059  

  • November 16, 2014
  • 02:43 AM
  • 140 views

Bilingual students at the crossroads

by Livia Gerber in Language on the Move

Secondary education as a monolingual fork in the road Let me bust a prevalent urban myth: You do not need to be bi- or multilingual to become a linguist. There, busted. In fact, being bilingual initially brought me to a … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 15, 2014
  • 07:28 AM
  • 213 views

How Your Facebook Updates Reveal Your Personality

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

The words you use in your Facebook profile reveal much about your personality, according to psychologists Gregory Park and colleagues in a new study just published. Based on a study of 71,000 Facebook users who reported their personality using an app, Park et al. found some quite unexpected words to be associated with given personality […]The post How Your Facebook Updates Reveal Your Personality appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Park G, Schwartz HA, Eichstaedt JC, Kern ML, Kosinski M, Stillwell DJ, Ungar LH, & Seligman ME. (2014) Automatic Personality Assessment Through Social Media Language. Journal of personality and social psychology. PMID: 25365036  

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