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  • July 20, 2014
  • 03:43 PM
  • 36 views

Babylonian Neurology and Psychiatry

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A fascinating little paper in Brain examines Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon. It’s a collaboration by British neurologist Edward H. Reynolds and Assyriologist James V. Kinnier Wilson. The sources they discuss are almost 4,000 years old, dating to the Old Babylonian Dynasty of 1894 – 1595 BC. Writing in cuneiform script impressed into clay tablets, […]The post Babylonian Neurology and Psychiatry appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Reynolds EH, & Kinnier Wilson JV. (2014) Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon. Brain : a journal of neurology. PMID: 25037816  

  • July 18, 2014
  • 02:51 AM
  • 111 views

Cross-cultural variation in men’s preference for sexual dimorphism in women’s faces

by Farid Pazhoohi in Epistemophil

Both attractiveness judgements and mate preferences vary considerably cross-culturally. We investigated whether men’s preference for femininity in women’s faces varies between 28 countries with diverse health conditions by analysing responses of 1972 heterosexual participants. Although men in all countries preferred feminized over masculinized female faces, we found substantial differences between countries in the magnitude of […]... Read more »

Marcinkowska UM, Kozlov MV, Cai H, Contreras-Garduño J, Dixson BJ, Oana GA, Kaminski G, Li NP, Lyons MT, Onyishi IE.... (2014) Cross-cultural variation in men's preference for sexual dimorphism in women's faces. Biology letters, 10(4), 20130850. PMID: 24789138  

  • July 17, 2014
  • 10:41 AM
  • 61 views

Around the time of early Homo

by Aurelie in Coffee break Science

Beginning of summer, now is as good a time as any to clear some space on my desktop and finally get rid of all the Firefox tabs I keep open, firmly believing I will have time to read them, soon. … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 15, 2014
  • 08:53 AM
  • 56 views

Understanding Privileged Access to Water from the Dead

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

As humans, we cannot survive without water. In the first world, we are privileged to have consistent access to fresh clean water. In many countries, access to water is based […]... Read more »

Lightfoot, E., Šlaus, M., & O'Connell, T. (2014) Water consumption in Iron Age, Roman, and Early Medieval Croatia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 154(4), 535-543. DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.22544  

  • July 14, 2014
  • 01:00 PM
  • 42 views

16 Ancient Clovis Elephant-Hunting Camp Discovered in Mexico

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

Archaeologists in Mexico have discovered an ancient camp where members of the Clovis culture hunted an elephant-like animal never before seen in North America's archaeological record. What’s more, the site dates to 13,400 years ago, making it one of the oldest known Clovis sites, and the southernmost evidence yet found of the culture's reach. Read on to find out more!... Read more »

Sanchez, G., Holliday, V., Gaines, E., Arroyo-Cabrales, J., Martinez-Taguena, N., Kowler, A., Lange, T., Hodgins, G., Mentzer, S., & Sanchez-Morales, I. (2014) Human (Clovis)-gomphothere (Cuvieronius sp.) association  13,390 calibrated yBP in Sonora, Mexico. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1404546111  

  • July 12, 2014
  • 01:42 PM
  • 121 views

Media and the Mind: Emotional Contagion

by JBSheppard in Antisense Science

Facebook recently carried out an experiment to change the emotions of over 600,000 users through a known psychological process called "emotional contagion". ... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:19 AM
  • 88 views

Say No to Nocebo: How Doctors Can Keep Patients’ Minds from Making Them Sicker

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

“First, do no harm,” the saying goes, but that might be close to impossible. Just as our expectations can make us feel better, they can also make us feel much worse. This means that how doctors phrase their instructions or introduce new drugs may have a real impact on our health. But some doctors are […]The post Say No to Nocebo: How Doctors Can Keep Patients’ Minds from Making Them Sicker appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:00 AM
  • 5 views

Chimp Talk

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Learn how to speak chimp with the newly translated language of chimpanzee gestures in non-play context.... Read more »

Hobaiter C, & Byrne RW. (2014) The Meanings of Chimpanzee Gestures. Current biology : CB. PMID: 24998524  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 09:21 AM
  • 82 views

Clothing the Dead in Ancient Peru

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

Why is clothing on the dead so important? Because what we choose to put on our bodies conveys social meanings about our wealth, our status, and the social groups we […]... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 03:28 AM
  • 72 views

Do chimps like to listen to African and Indian music?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

“While preferring silence to music from the West, chimpanzees apparently like to listen to the different rhythms of music from Africa and India, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.” ... Read more »

Mingle, M., Eppley, T., Campbell, M., Hall, K., Horner, V., & de Waal, F. (2014) Chimpanzees Prefer African and Indian Music Over Silence. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition. DOI: 10.1037/xan0000032  

Merchant, H., & Honing, H. (2013) Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 7(274). info:/

  • July 5, 2014
  • 11:12 AM
  • 96 views

All worn out: using dental attrition to estimate age

by JB in Bone Broke

I was recently working on the methods chapter of my dissertation (I'll pause so that you may lever your jaw up off of the floor - "JB? Working? On her dissertation?") when I stumbled upon a fantastic old school anthropology quote that struck my fancy. I'm currently mired in the midst of my section on adult aging, and given the fragmentary nature of many of the Marroquíes Bajos remains, traditional techniques that rely on cranial sutural closure, the auricular........ Read more »

Schour, J., and M. Massler. (1941) The development of the human dentition. Journal of the American Dental Association, 1153-1160. info:/

  • July 3, 2014
  • 02:25 AM
  • 59 views

Journal Club: DNA analysis indicates Bigfoot may be a big fake

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: A new genetic analysis of 'yeti' hair samples reveals they actually originated from dogs, horses, bears or other known mammals. ... Read more »

  • July 1, 2014
  • 09:37 PM
  • 119 views

DNA analysis indicates Bigfoot may be a big fake | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

A newly-published genetic analysis of hair samples suspected as being from a cryptic primate known by various names such as "bigfoot" or "yeti", has revealed they actually originated from dogs, horses, bears or other well known mammals. ... Read more »

  • June 28, 2014
  • 11:19 PM
  • 95 views

Predicting the Flu

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Using search engines to predict the future of infectious diseases: computer science meets epidemiology.... Read more »

  • June 27, 2014
  • 12:00 PM
  • 67 views

THE FUTURE OF FOOD?

by Lucy Gee in Antisense Science

In the world food has always been a necessity, but for most it represents a ritual, a pleasure, our culture. For many of us it’s synonymous with celebration and often associated with some of the happier moments in our lives – but do we need it? One man, Rob Rhinehart has embarked on a new life, without the need for solid food. He has created a product named Soylent (I know what you’re thinking, like that sci-fi book right? We’ve all heard of Soylent Green), which is an en........ Read more »

Epstein LH, Carr KA, Cavanaugh MD, Paluch RA, & Bouton ME. (2011) Long-term habituation to food in obese and nonobese women. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 94(2), 371-6. PMID: 21593492  

  • June 27, 2014
  • 06:00 AM
  • 59 views

Evidence of Hobbling, Torture Discovered at Ancient Massacre Site in Colorado

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

The site of a gruesome massacre some 1,200 years ago in southwestern Colorado is yielding new evidence of the severity, and the grisly intensity, of the violence that took place there.... Read more »

  • June 24, 2014
  • 12:13 PM
  • 30 views

One Grave Does Not Equal One Person: Hunter-gatherer Graves in Argentina

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

There seems to be an assumption that one grave will only hold one individual. Why we assume this is kind of strange given that even today we don’t always bury […]... Read more »

Flensborg, Martinez, & Bayala. (2014) Mortality Profiles of Hunter-Gatherer Societies: A Case Study from the Eastern Pampa–Patagonia Transition (Argentina) During the Final Late Holocene. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology. info:/

  • June 24, 2014
  • 09:04 AM
  • 143 views

No need to only send your best work to Science Magazine

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

The data clearly show that publications in Cell, Nature or Science (CNS for short), on average, cannot be distinguished from other publications, be it by methodology, reproducibility or other measures of quality. Even their citation advantage, while statistically significant, is […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...... Read more »

  • June 24, 2014
  • 06:31 AM
  • 103 views

The FDA’s Antidepressant Warning Didn’t Really “Backfire”

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

We read this week that ‘Black Box’ Warning on Antidepressants Raised Suicide Attempts A so-called “black box” warning on antidepressants that the medications increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in kids may have had a horrible side-effect. New research finds the warning backfired, causing an increase in suicide attempts by teens and young […]The post The FDA’s Antidepressant Warning Didn’t Really “Backfire” appeared first on Neuroskept........ Read more »

  • June 22, 2014
  • 09:46 PM
  • 127 views

English in the Global Village

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Tourism has been found to be beneficial for minority language maintenance in a number of contexts from around the world. For instance, Anand Torrents Alcaraz has recently shown here on Language on the Move that the growing tourism industry in … Continue reading →... Read more »

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