Post List

Computer Science / Engineering posts

(Modify Search »)

  • November 26, 2014
  • 09:35 AM
  • 26 views

Illusion Makes People Speak with the Voice of Their Avatar

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

Think you’re in control of your own body? A simple virtual-reality session could not only make you feel like an avatar’s body is your own, but make you speak more like the digital character. First there was the rubber-hand illusion, a classic experiment that showed syncing up someone’s touch perceptions with what they see happening […]The post Illusion Makes People Speak with the Voice of Their Avatar appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • November 25, 2014
  • 05:17 PM
  • 43 views

Blu-ray solar power

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

So here’s something you don’t see everyday. Blu-ray disks, you know the stuff we use for video games or DVDs also improve the performance of solar cells—suggesting a second use for unwanted discs—according to new research from Northwestern University. As surprising as this was, there is even better news, we know why they improve performance.... Read more »

  • November 21, 2014
  • 06:39 PM
  • 75 views

Dogtober = Canine science in October

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

What a BOOMING month for dogs and science October was! We've captured the links to all the latest blogs, research and news that caught out attention throughout Dog-tober.Thanks to Storify (click here if the you can't see the collection of links below) you can make sure you didn't miss out too.[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [01-31 October 2014]" on Storify] Further reading:Bradshaw J.W.S. & Nicola J. Rooney (2014). Why do adult dogs ‘play’?, Behavioural Processes, DOI: http:/........ Read more »

Bozkurt Alper, Barbara Sherman, Rita Brugarolas, Sean Mealin, John Majikes, Pu Yang, & Robert Loftin. (2014) Towards Cyber-Enhanced Working Dogs for Search and Rescue. IEEE Intelligent Systems, 1-1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/mis.2014.77  

  • November 21, 2014
  • 04:54 PM
  • 66 views

The impact of powered prosthetic failures on the user

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Prosthetics have come a long way in a relatively short amount of time. With the ongoing wars in the middle east the need for better prosthetics technologies has become more apparent, to this end we now have prosthetics that will allow a person to "feel", we even have motorized prosthetics that will help allow a more fluid walk, but while powered lower limb prosthetics hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall. Becau........ Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 08:08 AM
  • 92 views

Video Tip of the Week: UpSet about genomics Venn Diagrams?

by Mary in OpenHelix

Who can forget the Banana Venn? It was one of the most talked-about visualizations in genomics that I’m aware of. A new concept in data visualization: the Venn/banana diagram. MT @phylogenomics http://t.co/xjitNDNl — Iddo Friedberg (@iddux) July 19, 2012 Banana? RT @phylogenomics: Perhaps the best genomics Venn diagram ever #Bananas #NotSureWhatItMeansButDontCare http://t.co/xMV25GBG — Brian Kent […]... Read more »

D’Hont Angélique, Jean-Marc Aury, Franc-Christophe Baurens, Françoise Carreel, Olivier Garsmeur, Benjamin Noel, Stéphanie Bocs, Gaëtan Droc, Mathieu Rouard, & Corinne Da Silva. (2012) The banana (Musa acuminata) genome and the evolution of monocotyledonous plants. Nature, 488(7410), 213-217. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11241  

Lex Alexander , Gehlenborg Nils , Strobelt Hendrik , Vuillemot Romain Vuillemot, & Pfister Hanspeter . (2014) UpSet: Visualization of Intersecting Sets. IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics (InfoVis '14). info:other/TBD

Gibbs Richard A., Michael L. Metzker, Donna M. Muzny, Erica J. Sodergren, Steven Scherer, Graham Scott, David Steffen, Kim C. Worley, Paula E. Burch, & Geoffrey Okwuonu. (2004) Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution. Nature, 428(6982), 493-521. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02426  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 12:34 PM
  • 99 views

What is the most instantly recognisable song?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Everyone knows a hook when they hear one, but scientists don’t know why. By playing the Hooked on Music game you are exploring the science of songs and helping us to unlock what makes music catchy.

Last weekend the preliminary outcome of the online game was announced in Manchester, UK at the MOSI, answering the question: What is the most instantly recognisable song? Interestingly, numerous media started to report on this. A small media hype?... Read more »

J.A. Burgoyne, D. Bountouridis, J. van Balen, & H. Honing. (2013) Hooked: A Game for Discovering What Makes Music Catchy. Proceedings of the 14th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference , 245-250. info:/

  • November 3, 2014
  • 05:55 PM
  • 122 views

Reshaping the Limits of Synthetic Biology

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever think you could have built something better if you had a hand in the design? Sometimes people just have a desire to make, after all the maker movement is huge for a reason. Well geneticists have a new toy tool to play with —dubbed “the telomerator”—that could redefine the limits of synthetic biology and advance how successfully living things can be engineered or constructed in the laboratory based on an organism’s genetic, chemical base-pair structure. How cool is that?!... Read more »

J. Boeke et al. (2014) Circular permutation of a synthetic eukaryotic chromosome with the telomerator. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. info:/10.1073/pnas.1414399111

  • October 24, 2014
  • 04:27 AM
  • 123 views

Collective Structures in Software Projects

by Jörg Friedrich in Software Engineering Economics

To understand the social dynamics of complex software development processes, it is necessary to analyze in which structures the persons involved and how this involvement affected their work. Damian Tamburri has in recent years identified the relevant social structures in a number of publications, analyzed and graded on their effect. He first distinguishes four basic […]... Read more »

Tamburri, D., Lago, P., & Vliet, H. (2013) Organizational social structures for software engineering. ACM Computing Surveys, 46(1), 1-35. DOI: 10.1145/2522968.2522971  

  • October 21, 2014
  • 04:51 PM
  • 141 views

Dude, wheres my Hover Car? Oh wait…

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

We all (of a certain age) remember the Jetsons, a futuristic family with hi-tech gadgets and gizmos. However, nothing said, “the future is here” quite like things hovering. Even in the movie Back to the future, they have hover boards and flying cars. Unfortunately we don’t, which is a shame because according to the 1950’s we are the future, we should have hover-cars and hover boards… well the wait is over. Yep, introducing the first real hover board!... Read more »

Hendo Hover. (2014) Hendo Hoverboards - World's first REAL hoverboard. Kickstarter. info:other/Here

  • October 20, 2014
  • 04:50 PM
  • 166 views

A Venusian Mystery Explored Once More

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Venus, the place where women are from... supposedly. To say Venus has a harsh climate would be an understatement, this is one of many reasons why we will never (or maybe not soon) see a "long lasting" Venus rover counterpart to our Mars rover missions. Still, the planet (much like all the other plants) can teach us a lot about not just our own origins, but the origins of the universe. Also like all our neighbor planets Venus is hiding something beneath its brilliant shroud of clouds, a mystery t........ Read more »

Harrington, E. et. Al. (2014) The puzzle of radar-bright highlands on venus: a high-spatial resolution study in Ovda regio. Geological Society of America. info:other/136-4

  • October 20, 2014
  • 12:12 PM
  • 153 views

How a camera and quantum physics could improve phone security

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

New study uses mobile phone camera to detect light, using shot noise to generate true random numbers which researchers hope could be used for encryption in the future.... Read more »

Sanguinetti, B., Martin, A., Zbinden, H., & Gisin, N. (2014) Quantum Random Number Generation on a Mobile Phone. Physical Review X, 4(3). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.031056  

  • October 19, 2014
  • 07:24 AM
  • 54 views

Power Makes People Deliberate Less Over Emails

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

When it comes to emails, power makes people spend less time thinking and more time typing. So say German cyber-psychologists Annika Scholl and Kai Sassenberg in a new paper just published: Experienced Social Power Reduces Deliberation During E-Mail Communication In their study, they recruited 49 undergraduate students. Each participant was first randomly assigned to play […]The post Power Makes People Deliberate Less Over Emails appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 04:58 PM
  • 150 views

Carbon’s Place in a Silicon World

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Everything is silicon based, well mainly your computer, your TV, your ipad, and pretty much every piece of electronics in existence. Still the world turns and so does technology; at a similarly fast pace no less. Even as the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has enshrined light emitting diodes (LEDs) as the single most significant and disruptive energy-efficient lighting solution of today, scientists around the world continue unabated to search for the even-better-bulbs of tomorrow. In this search we ........ Read more »

Sharon Bahena-Garrido, Norihiro Shimoi, Daisuke Abe, Toshimasa Hojo, Yasumitsu Tanaka, & Kazuyuki Tohji. (2014) Plannar light source using a phosphor screen with single-walled carbon nanotubes as field emitters. Review of Scientific Instruments. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4895913

  • October 9, 2014
  • 04:10 PM
  • 201 views

Solar Panel Hybrid is Cheap and Super Efficient

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Solar cells are inefficient, it’s a sad fact. With todays technology they boast about a 10-15% efficiency, compare that to todays gas engine at roughly 20-25% and you can see it’s not quite up to par. Well that could all change very soon thanks to a new method for transferring energy from organic to inorganic semiconductors. This could boost the efficiency of widely used inorganic solar cells to as close as 100% efficiency as they can get.... Read more »

Tabachnyk M, Ehrler B, Gélinas S, Böhm ML, Walker BJ, Musselman KP, Greenham NC, Friend RH, & Rao A. (2014) Resonant energy transfer of triplet excitons from pentacene to PbSe nanocrystals. Nature materials. PMID: 25282509  

  • October 7, 2014
  • 05:17 AM
  • 171 views

Story behind our paper on speeding-up all-against-all comparisons for homology inference

by Christophe Dessimoz in Open Reading Frame

This post accompanies a recent publication and is part of our
series story behind the paper,
inspired by Jonathan Eisen’s series of the same
name.

One fundamental step in sequence analysis is the identification of homologous
sequences, sequences related through common ancestry. There are many different
ways of identifying homolog but they broadly fall into two categories:
all-against-all comparisons and clustering.

The all-against-all approach aligns every sequence with every other........ Read more »

  • September 25, 2014
  • 10:37 AM
  • 250 views

A New Discovery in the Treatment of Autoimmunity and Chronic Inflammation

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Lupus, Type 1 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis are all diseases brought on by autoimmunity — the bodies inability to tell itself apart from foreign invaders. Finding a cure, or even a suitable treatment has been to put it gently a long, painful road, with little to show for it. On the forefront of the war against the body betrayal is immunosuppressants, which with them carry their own set of side effects and in most cases only off mild to moderate relief of symptoms. But that is all changing a........ Read more »

Dubiella C, Cui H, Gersch M, Brouwer AJ, Sieber SA, Krüger A, Liskamp RM, & Groll M. (2014) Selective Inhibition of the Immunoproteasome by Ligand-Induced Crosslinking of the Active Site. Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in English). PMID: 25244435  

  • September 23, 2014
  • 01:55 PM
  • 239 views

Lie Detection using Brain Waves: It’s just as creepy as it sounds…

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Currently lie detectors (polygraphs) are not admissible in court, this is because (despite what you may read) there is little proof to show that they are much better than a guess — coming in at roughly 50% accuracy. They aren’t really based in science, making them more of a toy. There might just be a new contender in the lie detection department coming soon however, researchers have found that brain activity can be used to tell whether someone recognizes details they encountered in normal, d........ Read more »

  • September 21, 2014
  • 02:33 PM
  • 204 views

Move over Carbon nanotubes introducing Diamond nanothreads

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Carbon nanotubes, the wave of the future. Our hopes and dreams for the future have been firmly placed in using the unique material for everything from electronics to engineering. Unfortunately the production of carbon nanotubes has been hampered by setbacks, which as it turns out might not be a bad thing. This is because for the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin “diamond nanothreads” that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greate........ Read more »

Fitzgibbons, T., Guthrie, M., Xu, E., Crespi, V., Davidowski, S., Cody, G., Alem, N., & Badding, J. (2014) Benzene-derived carbon nanothreads. Nature Materials. DOI: 10.1038/nmat4088  

  • September 19, 2014
  • 07:28 PM
  • 197 views

Nanosponges Clean up Antibody-mediated Autoimmune Disease

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

What does lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatic heart disease have in common? All of these (and many other) apparently unrelated disorders are caused by autoimmunity, in which the immune system produces antibodies that attack normal, healthy cells and tissues. Currently considered incurable, these autoimmune diseases can be managed, but to varying degrees and not without serious side effects. Moreover, autoimmune diseases include a wide range of dysfunct........ Read more »

Copp JA, Fang RH, Luk BT, Hu CM, Gao W, Zhang K, & Zhang L. (2014) Clearance of pathological antibodies using biomimetic nanoparticles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(37), 13481-6. PMID: 25197051  

  • September 19, 2014
  • 06:25 PM
  • 208 views

Estimating how much we don't know

by Iddo Friedberg in Byte Size Biology

Most of our understanding of what genes do comes from computational predictions, rather than actual experiments. For almost any given gene that is sequenced, its function is determined by putting its sequence through one or more function annotation algorithms. Computational annotation is cheaper and more feasible than cloning, translating, and assaying the gene product (typically a protein) to find out exactly what it does. Experiments can be long, expensive and, in many cases, impossible to pe........ Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.