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  • July 11, 2014
  • 10:22 AM
  • 3 views

Ye Old Science Journal. Interesting articles from the premiere journal of 1880.

by The Lab Hippo in The Lab Hippo

One of the perks to my job is that I can get access to just about any journal article I want for free. I know, it sounds like a dream life, but hey you go to college for 10 years and you get some favors thrown your way. A few years ago Science scanned all their historical archives put them online, so I begun to peruse a few and was pleasantly amused. In what may become a recurring theme to the LabHippo, I now present to you some of the more entertaining articles. We begin with the first year Sci........ Read more »

  • July 11, 2014
  • 10:21 AM
  • 3 views

Part 2. Epigenetics. Rat Tounges & Ham Sandwiches Can Influence Children

by The Lab Hippo in The Lab Hippo

Picture your parents having sex. No..no good, too weird? OK then, picture your grandparents having sex. Even weirder? Fine, picture your great-grandparents having sex. That one might not be as bad. Chances are you never met your great-grandparents, which makes them somewhat strangers to you. You had eight great-grandparents and though you might not even know their names, about 12.5 percent of your DNA was inherited from them. Now imagine your great-grandmother eating a ham sandwich while having ........ Read more »

Pembrey, M., Bygren, L., Kaati, G., Edvinsson, S., Northstone, K., Sjöström, M., & Golding, J. (2005) Sex-specific, male-line transgenerational responses in humans. European Journal of Human Genetics, 14(2), 159-166. DOI: 10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201538  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 10:19 AM
  • 2 views

Epigenetics. Rat Tounges & Ham Sandwiches Can Influence Children (Part 1)

by The Lab Hippo in The Lab Hippo

There’s a concept in biology that has begun to break into mainstream culture that makes the mishmosh of genetics even more complicated. It’s called ‘epigenetics’, and it can explain how our environment, such as what we eat and breath, can influence our DNA. Biologists have known about epigenetics for some time, but it seems to have gained widespread traction lately largely due to findings that a mother can influence her unborn child’s DNA during pregnancy. This is called ‘intergenera........ Read more »

Rönn T, Volkov P, Davegårdh C, Dayeh T, Hall E, Olsson AH, Nilsson E, Tornberg A, Dekker Nitert M, Eriksson KF.... (2013) A six months exercise intervention influences the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue. PLoS genetics, 9(6). PMID: 23825961  

Weaver, I., Cervoni, N., Champagne, F., D'Alessio, A., Sharma, S., Seckl, J., Dymov, S., Szyf, M., & Meaney, M. (2004) Epigenetic programming by maternal behavior. Nature Neuroscience, 7(8), 847-854. DOI: 10.1038/nn1276  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 04:48 AM
  • 13 views

Maternal C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and offspring schizophrenia

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A big quote to start this post: "This finding provides the most robust evidence to date that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in schizophrenia, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders".Ophelia @ Wikipedia The source for this quote was the paper by Sarah Canetta and colleagues [1] based on an analysis of serum samples from mums for C-reactive protein (CRP) as ........ Read more »

Canetta, S., Sourander, A., Surcel, H., Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, S., Leiviskä, J., Kellendonk, C., McKeague, I., & Brown, A. (2014) Elevated Maternal C-Reactive Protein and Increased Risk of Schizophrenia in a National Birth Cohort. American Journal of Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.13121579  

  • July 11, 2014
  • 01:23 AM
  • 18 views

When running, lean forward at the ankle or the hip?

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

When running, lean forward at the ankle or the hip?... Read more »

  • July 11, 2014
  • 12:15 AM
  • 12 views

Remote CPR Skills Testing Online - A Crazy Idea?

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

On the MedicCast, Jamie Davis interviews Roy Shaw of SUMO about a method of remote CPR certification for health care providers.

"The Single Use Manikin Option, or SUMO™, is an AHA-compliant way of getting certified in CPR completely online.[1]"

What different ways of dealing with certification/recertification problems should we use?... Read more »

Sutton RM, Niles D, Meaney PA, Aplenc R, French B, Abella BS, Lengetti EL, Berg RA, Helfaer MA, Nadkarni V. (2011) Low-Dose, High-Frequency CPR Training Improves Skill Retention of In-Hospital Pediatric Providers. PEDIATRICS, 128(1). DOI: 10.1542/peds.2010-2105d  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 01:59 PM
  • 44 views

Don’t Listen to the Voices: Understanding Consciousness

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There is a voice in my head. Don't worry it's mine... I think [a story for another time I'm sure], but why is my voice inside my head? What causes me to hear myself while I type these very words, or even better you to hear them in your voice as you read them? Consciousness is a complex and very confusing thing. I think therefore I am? Science has had trouble cracking that nut and philosophy just won't cut it in the realm of neuroscience. [...]... Read more »

Paller, K., & Suzuki, S. (2014) The source of consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2014.05.012  

  • July 10, 2014
  • 03:34 AM
  • 43 views

Viral exposure and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A whole slew of articles published by Ivan Gentile and colleagues based at the University of Naples (Italy) brought me to writing this post looking at some of the literature on viral exposures and autism. Viruses, in case you didn't know, are some of nature's survivors, infecting host cells and reproducing, onwards hopeful of finding more (un)willing cells/organisms to infect. Humankind have developed various biological defence mechanisms against the viral (and bacterial) onslaught that we all f........ Read more »

Gentile I, Zappulo E, Bonavolta R, Maresca R, Messana T, Buonomo AR, Portella G, Sorrentino R, Settimi A, Pascotto A.... (2014) Prevalence and Titre of Antibodies to Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder. In vivo (Athens, Greece), 28(4), 621-626. PMID: 24982232  

Gentile I, Zappulo E, Bonavolta R, Maresca R, Riccio MP, Buonomo AR, Portella G, Vallefuoco L, Settimi A, Pascotto A.... (2014) Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 Antibodies in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders. In vivo (Athens, Greece), 28(4), 667-671. PMID: 24982239  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 07:33 PM
  • 46 views

The effects of the sole geometry of the On running shoe

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

The effects of the sole geometry of the On running shoe... Read more »

Knoepfli-Lenzin, C., Waech, J., Gülay, T., Schellenberg, F., & Lorenzetti, S. (2014) The influence of a new sole geometry while running. Journal of Sports Sciences, 1-9. DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2014.915421  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 01:37 PM
  • 60 views

Lose Weight, Live Longer. Simple, Right?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Suprise! Really this shouldn’t come as a shock, but adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a younger age from cancer and other complications like stroke, diabetes, heart disease, […]... Read more »

Kitahara, C., Flint, A., Berrington de Gonzalez, A., Bernstein, L., Brotzman, M., MacInnis, R., Moore, S., Robien, K., Rosenberg, P., Singh, P.... (2014) Association between Class III Obesity (BMI of 40–59 kg/m2) and Mortality: A Pooled Analysis of 20 Prospective Studies. PLoS Medicine, 11(7). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001673  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 12:06 PM
  • 39 views

Brain Hippocampus Atrophy in Traumatic Brain Injury

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Understanding the specific brain regions vulnerable to traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important for assessment and intervention research.Two areas of active research include studies of brain white matter using diffusion tensor imaging and assessment of regional brain atrophy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Two recent MRI studies have suggested the brain hippocampus may be a region of vulnerability to TBI.A Canadian study by Robin Green and colleagues used brain MRI to examine a cohort of........ Read more »

Green RE, Colella B, Maller JJ, Bayley M, Glazer J, & Mikulis DJ. (2014) Scale and pattern of atrophy in the chronic stages of moderate-severe TBI. Frontiers in human neuroscience, 67. PMID: 24744712  

Singh R, Meier TB, Kuplicki R, Savitz J, Mukai I, Cavanagh L, Allen T, Teague TK, Nerio C, Polanski D.... (2014) Relationship of collegiate football experience and concussion with hippocampal volume and cognitive outcomes. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 311(18), 1883-8. PMID: 24825643  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:32 AM
  • 40 views

TCAS AS PAINKILLERS: PROOF THAT YOU CAN TEACH AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS

by Emily Lawson in Antisense Science

The creation of a new drug that is safer, more effective, and has fewer side effects than the current treatment surely renders the current treatment obsolete, right? Well, not necessarily.

Take tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) for instance. TCAs are a class of antidepressant that work by blocking the serotonin and noradrenaline transporters, leading to an increase in the amount of serotonin and noradrenaline in the synapse. As the current theory says that depression is caused by low levels of........ Read more »

Sindrup, S., Otto, M., Finnerup, N., & Jensen, T. (2005) Antidepressants in the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain. Basic Clinical Pharmacology Toxicology, 96(6), 399-409. DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-7843.2005.pto_96696601.x  

Bohren Y, Tessier LH, Megat S, Petitjean H, Hugel S, Daniel D, Kremer M, Fournel S, Hein L, Schlichter R.... (2013) Antidepressants suppress neuropathic pain by a peripheral β2-adrenoceptor mediated anti-TNFα mechanism. Neurobiology of disease, 39-50. PMID: 23978467  

Micó JA, Ardid D, Berrocoso E, & Eschalier A. (2006) Antidepressants and pain. Trends in pharmacological sciences, 27(7), 348-54. PMID: 16762426  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:19 AM
  • 56 views

Say No to Nocebo: How Doctors Can Keep Patients’ Minds from Making Them Sicker

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

“First, do no harm,” the saying goes, but that might be close to impossible. Just as our expectations can make us feel better, they can also make us feel much worse. This means that how doctors phrase their instructions or introduce new drugs may have a real impact on our health. But some doctors are […]The post Say No to Nocebo: How Doctors Can Keep Patients’ Minds from Making Them Sicker appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 09:37 AM
  • 52 views

Video Tip of the Week: Google Genomics, API and GAbrowse

by Mary in OpenHelix

This week’s video tip comes to us from Google–it’s about their participation in the “Global Alliance for Genomics and Health” coalition. Global Alliance is aimed at developing genomic data standards for interoperability, and they’ve been working on creating the framework (some background links below in the references will provide further details). It has over 170 […]... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 09:21 AM
  • 55 views

A Deadly Shot: Heart Attacks During The World Cup

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

Studies show that there is an increase in cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, at the time of important football matches like the World Cup. Especially penalty shoot-outs can cause a higher number of myocardial infarctions. However, there are also studies that report no significant influence or even a decrease in cardiac emergencies.... Read more »

Mendenhall, M., Ute Wilbert-Lampen, M.D.,, David Leistner, M.D.,, Sonja Greven, M.S.,, Tilmann Pohl, M.D.,, Sebastian Sper,, Christoph Völker,, Denise Güthlin,, Andrea Plasse,, Andreas Knez, M.D.,.... (2008) Cardiovascular Events During World Cup Soccer. The Journal of Emergency Medicine, 35(1), 114-115. DOI: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2008.03.028  

Carroll D, Ebrahim S, Tilling K, Macleod J, & Smith GD. (2002) Admissions for myocardial infarction and World Cup football: database survey. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 325(7378), 1439-42. PMID: 12493655  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 08:15 AM
  • 58 views

What’s So Repelling About Repellents?

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

It’s amazing that even though citronella and DEET reduce mosquito bites, we have very little idea of how they work. New research is showing that DEET interacts with olfactory receptors so that chemical attractants are still sensed, but their interpretations are confused. You are still there, but you pretty disappear as far as the mosquito is concerned. Other research shows that one of the co-receptors for olfactory receptors is responsible not only for DEET activity, but also for mosquito ........ Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 05:52 AM
  • 40 views

Familial Recurrence of Autism Spectrum Disorder (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Neil Risch and colleagues [1] adds to the growing literature looking at the question of familial recurrence of autism i.e. if one child has a diagnosis of autism, how likely are subsequent children to be similarly diagnosed. The answer according to this latest data: "The overall sibling recurrence risk was 10.1%" compared with 0.5% in siblings of asymptomatic controls. This figure is pretty much the same as that reported by Sandin and colleagues [2] covered not so long ago (see here........ Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 01:18 AM
  • 45 views

The Warrior Gene, Back from the Grave

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

Recently two meta-analyses on the gene, monoamine oxidase A, and its relationship with violence came to opposite conclusions. I review those studies and pose the questions that the scientists were too afraid to answer.... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 24 views

If You’re Not Using the SCAT-2 For On-Field Concussion Diagnosis Maybe You Should Be

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The SCAT-2 tool composite score is useful in sports-related concussion assessment in a college setting due to its high sensitivity and specificity especially if you can compare a post injury score with a baseline measure.... Read more »

  • July 8, 2014
  • 05:40 PM
  • 36 views

The importance of joint moments in running injury risk and running economy

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

The importance of joint moments in running injury risk and running economy... Read more »

Lambach, R., Asay, J., Jamison, S., Pan, X., Schmitt, L., Blazek, K., Siston, R., Andriacchi, T., & Chaudhari, A. (2014) Evidence for joint moment asymmetry in healthy populations during gait. Gait . DOI: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2014.06.010  

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