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  • May 30, 2011
  • 06:53 PM
  • 1,629 views

Who really killed Shanidar 3?

by Julien Riel-Salvatore in A Very Remote Period Indeed

Fun with footnotes, today at AVRPI!! You'll remember that a couple of summers ago, a study by Churchill et al. (2009) tried to argue that the cut marks on a rib from the Shanidar 3 Neanderthal were the result of a wound inflicted by a modern human on that poor sap. Naturally, the science press had a field day with this, although several commentators argued that the evidence presented by Churchill... Read more »

Churchill, S., Franciscus, R., McKean-Peraza, H., Daniel, J., & Warren, B. (2009) Shanidar 3 Neandertal rib puncture wound and paleolithic weaponry. Journal of Human Evolution, 57(2), 163-178. DOI: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2009.05.010  

Trinkaus, E., & Buzhilova, A. (2010) The death and burial of sunghir 1. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology. DOI: 10.1002/oa.1227  

  • May 30, 2011
  • 02:32 AM
  • 1,342 views

Shamanic Initiations: A hidden Theme within the Fairy Tale of Hansel and Gretel

by Franco Bejarano in CulturePotion

While the fairy tale of "Hansel and Gretel" is often regarded as a coming of age story, the tale actually depicts another kind of rite of passage, that of shamanic initiations. The article is a comparative study with the narrative of initiation rituals around the world, along with other figures of folklore.
To say that by defeating the witch, one becomes a witch would be a paradox, especially in the genre of fairy tales that often demonizes witches, however, given the ambiguity attrib........ Read more »

Joan Halifax. (1990) The shaman's initiation. ReVision, 13(2), 53. info:/9607292149

  • May 29, 2011
  • 10:53 PM
  • 988 views

Health effects from chemical exposures – not just a modern phenomenon

by Ashartus in exposure/effect

When we think about exposures to chemicals causing adverse effects on human health, there is a tendency to view this as a product of modern industrial societies. To some extent this is true – there are certainly potentially hazardous chemicals we are exposed to as a result of our lifestyles, such as volatile chemicals in [...]... Read more »

  • May 29, 2011
  • 06:04 AM
  • 1,162 views

Do Antidepressants Work? The Internet Says...

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

..."yes and no". A while back I blogged about some researchers who analysed internet discussions of antidepressants to work out what users thought about them. Now a new paper's just come out, doing much the same thing but focussed on a single comment thread: Miracle Drug, Poison, or Placebo.Back in 2008, MSNBC ran this article, prompted by the recent publication of the famous Kirsch paper. The article itself was short but the ensuing discussion in the comments rapidly grew to epic proportions. B........ Read more »

  • May 28, 2011
  • 03:18 PM
  • 1,487 views

Religious Evolution: Sami Sticks & Phoenician Stones

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

Unlike living organisms, cultural formations do not “evolve.” Evolution, sensu stricto, is a biological process and not a cultural one. Despite this fact, some scholars have fruitfully deployed evolutionary ideas — as analogy and metaphor — to analyze cultural history.
In 1964 the sociologist Robert Bellah did just this in his classic paper, Religious Evolution. Taking [...]... Read more »

Bellah, R. (1964) Religious Evolution. American Sociological Review, 29(3), 358. DOI: 10.2307/2091480  

Stockton, Eugene D. (1974) Phoenician Cult Stones. Australian Journal of Biblical Archaeology, 1-27. info:/

  • May 27, 2011
  • 05:14 PM
  • 1,385 views

Non-Chacoan Kivas at Chaco

by teofilo in Gambler's House

Implicit in my previous discussion of “Chacoan” kivas was the idea that the term “Chacoan” in this context refers to a specific architectural form defined by a collection of features, rather than to a geographic location.  Thus, Chacoan kivas are common at Chaco Canyon, but they are also found at many sites outside the canyon, [...]... Read more »

  • May 27, 2011
  • 02:14 PM
  • 1,174 views

Culinary trends in an extinct hominid

by zacharoo in Lawn Chair Anthropology

A few weeks ago I discussed a recent paper that analyzed the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from Australopithecus boisei molars (Cerling et al. 2011). The major finding here was that an enlarged sample (n=24 more) corroborated earlier isotopic (van der Merwe et al. 2008) and tooth wear evidence (Ungar et al. 2008) that A. boisei probably did not subsist on as much hard foods as previously thought. Although this strange hominid probably ate mostly grass/aquatic tubers, some researchers think it........ Read more »

  • May 26, 2011
  • 09:02 PM
  • 841 views

What Makes a “Kiva” “Chacoan”?

by teofilo in Gambler's House

Sticking with the topic of the small round rooms traditionally called “kivas,” which Steve Lekson would prefer to call simply “round rooms,” it’s important to note that there is a wide variety of formal types.  In addition to the modern distinction between square and round kivas, which is basically geographical with square ones in the [...]... Read more »

  • May 25, 2011
  • 09:29 PM
  • 805 views

What Makes a “Kiva” “Great”?

by teofilo in Gambler's House

Although the idea that the small round rooms that area so common at Chacoan sites are ceremonial “kivas” has been increasingly challenged recently, it is still widely accepted that the large, formal, round structures known as “great kivas” were in fact community-wide ceremonial or integrative facilities.  Even Steve Lekson agrees, and he continues to use [...]... Read more »

  • May 25, 2011
  • 08:16 PM
  • 1,685 views

Do hips spread with age?

by Kristina Killgrove in Powered By Osteons

New research by UNC Chapel Hill scientists suggests that hip bones grow with age.... Read more »

Berger AA, May R, Renner JB, Viradia N, & Dahners LE. (2011) Surprising evidence of pelvic growth (widening) after skeletal maturity. Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society. PMID: 21608025  

  • May 25, 2011
  • 05:04 PM
  • 827 views

What Is a Kiva?

by teofilo in Gambler's House

As I mentioned in the previous post, one of the ongoing debates in Chacoan architectural studies concerns the function of the round rooms that are very noticeable and numerous at the excavated great houses in the canyon.  The standard interpretation for many years, which is still fairly common among archaeologists and nearly universal among the [...]... Read more »

  • May 25, 2011
  • 12:48 PM
  • 1,604 views

Bones, Burials and Ancestors

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

Death is big business. This past year, Americans spent $15 billion on funeral related expenses. Americans are not outliers when it comes to death spending; funeral related expenditures around the world are estimated to be at least this much and probably more. Strangely, the ratio of death spending does not diminish in poorer countries. In [...]... Read more »

  • May 25, 2011
  • 12:15 PM
  • 2,019 views

Palawan’s fauna 14,000 to 5,000 (cal) years before present

by nath in Imprints of Philippine Science

An accounting of the fauna of the island of Palawan (Philippines) 14,000 to 5,000 years before present.... Read more »

Piper, P., Ochoa, J., Robles, E., Lewis, H., & Paz, V. (2011) Palaeozoology of Palawan Island, Philippines. Quaternary International, 233(2), 142-158. DOI: 10.1016/j.quaint.2010.07.009  

  • May 24, 2011
  • 01:27 PM
  • 929 views

The Science of Beauty

by Abi Millar in Elements Science

From parasite resistance to the golden ratio – Abi Millar examines the science behind what is considered ‘beautiful’.



Related posts:The Science of Beauty
Video: The law of attraction: Study finds what men want
Polygamy bad for women
... Read more »

  • May 24, 2011
  • 07:21 AM
  • 1,698 views

What Lies Beneath Pompeii

by Kristina Killgrove in Powered By Osteons

Ground penetrating radar survey of part of Pompeii reveals its utility in understanding the important ancient site.... Read more »

E. Pettinelli, P.M. Barone, A. Di Matteo, E. Mattei, & S.E. Lauro. (2011) Mapping the undiscovered ruins of Pompeii (Naples, Italy) using ground penetrating radar. Archaeometry. info:/10.1111/j.1475-4754.2011.00599.x

  • May 23, 2011
  • 08:17 PM
  • 1,740 views

Learning to be marginal

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Much of my research over the past decade has involved talking to migrants to Australia and overseas students about their experiences of language learning and settlement. In these conversations, I have often been struck by the strong sense of disappointment … Continue reading →... Read more »

Karuna Morarji. (2010) Where does the rural educated person fit? Development and social reproduction in contemporary India. Contesting Development: Critical Struggles for Social Change (ed. Philip McMichael). Routledge, 50-63. info:/

  • May 20, 2011
  • 03:28 PM
  • 1,329 views

The 9,000-year-old La Jolla Fisherman and -woman

by Kristina Killgrove in Powered By Osteons

Who owns the past, and who should have a say in the disposition of Palaeoindian skeletons?... Read more »

Dalton R. (2008) No burial for 10,000-year-old bones. Nature, 455(7217), 1156-7. PMID: 18971985  

Dalton R. (2009) Scientists in bone battle. Nature, 458(7236), 265. PMID: 19295571  

Schoeninger MJ, Bada JL, Masters PM, Bettinger RL, & White TD. (2011) Unexamined bodies of evidence. Science (New York, N.Y.), 332(6032), 916. PMID: 21596975  

  • May 20, 2011
  • 09:14 AM
  • 1,962 views

Thyme for something new? Orangutans and new food choices.

by Serious Monkey Business in This is Serious Monkey Business

A recent study examined captive orangutans' learning processes in trying new foods and whether or not neophobia persists in captive orangutans. Also includes what this exactly means.... Read more »

Gustafsson E, Krief S, & Saint Jalme M. (2011) Neophobia and Learning Mechanisms: How Captive Orangutans Discover Medicinal Plants. Folia primatologica; international journal of primatology, 82(1), 45-55. PMID: 21525772  

  • May 20, 2011
  • 04:02 AM
  • 1,312 views

If you need to fight, stand upright.

by Eric in APE

Did our ancestors began to stand on two legs, because it gave them an advantage in beating up their rivals? Well at least this is what David Carrier tried to find out in his most recent study, as he looked at how hard people were able to punch when they stood upright and when they didn’t.First of all, how does someone come to this kind of idea? Carrier explains that an upright stance is a common behaviour seen ion other mammals when they want to threat/fight their opponents and that ........ Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 05:30 PM
  • 1,440 views

Standing up to fight, and human uniqueness

by zinjanthropus in A Primate of Modern Aspect

A new paper published in PLoS ONE by David Carrier tests the hypothesis that bipedalism in humans evolved because it helps them to fight better. The first fatal flaw lies in the first sentence: Many quadrupedal animals stand on their hindlimbs to fight. How then, does this explain human uniqueness? Clifford Jolly wrote in The [...]... Read more »

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