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  • August 23, 2010
  • 10:12 AM
  • 1,062 views

The dog-human connection in evolution

by gregdowney in Neuroanthropology

Evolutionary theorists have long recognized that the domestication of animals represented a major change in human life, providing not just a close-at-hand food source, but also non-human muscle power and a host of other advantages. Penn State anthropologist Prof. Pat Shipman argues that animal domestication is one manifestation of a larger distinctive trait of our [...]... Read more »

Bleed, Peter. (2006) Living in the human niche. Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, 15(1), 8-10. DOI: 10.1002/evan.20084  

Miklósi A, Kubinyi E, Topál J, Gácsi M, Virányi Z, & Csányi V. (2003) A simple reason for a big difference: wolves do not look back at humans, but dogs do. Current biology : CB, 13(9), 763-6. PMID: 12725735  

Paxton, D. (2000) A Case for a Naturalistic Perspective. Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People , 13(1), 5-8. DOI: 10.2752/089279300786999996  

Schleidt, Wolfgang M., & Shalter, Michael D. (2003) Co-evolution of Humans and Canids: An Alternative View of Dog Domestication: Homo Homini Lupus?. Evolution and Cognition, 9(1), 57-72. info:/

Shipman, Pat. (2010) The Animal Connection and Human Evolution. Current Anthropology, 51(4), 519-538. DOI: 10.1086/653816  

  • August 20, 2010
  • 11:25 PM
  • 1,365 views

Paleolithic whodunnit: Who made the Chatelperronian?

by Julien Riel-Salvatore in A Very Remote Period Indeed

The Chatelperronian is a lithic industry that springs up for several thousand years during the transition from Middle to Upper Paleolithic industries. Its precise age is debated, but it clearly is associated with this interval. One of the reasons the Chatelperronian is the subject of so much debate is because, since the discovery of a Neanderthal in a Chatelperronian level at the site of
St. ... Read more »

  • August 20, 2010
  • 02:38 PM
  • 782 views

The Scientist and the Anarchist - Part III

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Deborah Blum at her website Speakeasy Science.When an estimated 1,400 match-girls went on strike in July, 1888 to protest for better working conditions, it started a fire that became known as New Unionism. Soon after came the London dock workers’ strike, and within twelve months the UK’s Trade Union Congress had increased its membership from 670,000 to 1,593,000. [1]For Thomas Henry Huxley and Peter Kropotkin these labor developments were ........ Read more »

Peter Kropotkin. (1902) Mutual Aide: A Factor of Evolution. New York: McClure, Philips . info:/

  • August 20, 2010
  • 02:38 PM
  • 647 views

The Scientist and the Anarchist - Part III

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Deborah Blum at her website Speakeasy Science.When an estimated 1,400 match-girls went on strike in July, 1888 to protest for better working conditions, it started a fire that became known as New Unionism. Soon after came the London dock workers’ strike, and within twelve months the UK’s Trade Union Congress had increased its membership from 670,000 to 1,593,000. [1]For Thomas Henry Huxley and Peter Kropotkin these labor developments were ........ Read more »

Peter Kropotkin. (1902) Mutual Aide: A Factor of Evolution. New York: McClure, Philips . info:/

  • August 20, 2010
  • 10:02 AM
  • 832 views

Schizophrenia, Genes and Environment

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

Schizophrenia is generally thought of as the "most genetic" of all psychiatric disorders and in the past 10 years there have been heroic efforts to find the genes responsible for it, with not much success so far.A new study reminds us that there's more to it than genes alone: Social Risk or Genetic Liability for Psychosis? The authors decided to look at adopted children, because this is one of the best ways of disentangling genes and environment.If you find that the children of people with schiz........ Read more »

  • August 19, 2010
  • 04:32 PM
  • 501 views

About Those Chaco Burials

by teofilo in Gambler's House

In discussing a recent paper using stable-isotope techniques to evaluate subsistence in the Southwest during the Basketmaker period, I mentioned that one of the control samples used for contextual comparisons of the Basketmaker results came from Chaco Canyon great house burials.  I don’t know how on earth the Utah-based researchers managed to get permission to [...]... Read more »

  • August 19, 2010
  • 01:29 PM
  • 559 views

Sacrifice on the Serengeti: Life History, Genetic Relatedness, and the Evolution of Menopause

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Dr. Carin Bondar at her website CarinBondar.com.Imagine you’re on the Serengeti Plateau and your children are hungry. For miles in every direction there’s nothing but dry scrub grass with the occasional flat-topped acacia tree marking the landscape. Your oldest has found a spot to dig for tubers but he and your daughter aren’t strong enough to scrape away the hard, baked earth by themselves. Your husband is tracking a wounded gazelle and........ Read more »

Fox, M., Sear, R., Beise, J., Ragsdale, G., Voland, E., & Knapp, L. (2009) Grandma plays favourites: X-chromosome relatedness and sex-specific childhood mortality. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 277(1681), 567-573. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2009.1660  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 01:29 PM
  • 556 views

Sacrifice on the Serengeti: Life History, Genetic Relatedness, and the Evolution of Menopause

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Dr. Carin Bondar at her website CarinBondar.com.Imagine you’re on the Serengeti Plateau and your children are hungry. For miles in every direction there’s nothing but dry scrub grass with the occasional flat-topped acacia tree marking the landscape. Your oldest has found a spot to dig for tubers but he and your daughter aren’t strong enough to scrape away the hard, baked earth by themselves. Your husband is tracking a wounded gazelle and........ Read more »

Fox, M., Sear, R., Beise, J., Ragsdale, G., Voland, E., & Knapp, L. (2009) Grandma plays favourites: X-chromosome relatedness and sex-specific childhood mortality. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 277(1681), 567-573. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2009.1660  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 12:20 PM
  • 873 views

Sacrifice on the Serengeti – A Guest Post by Eric M Johnson

by Dr. Carin Bondar in Dr. Carin Bondar - Biologist With a Twist

I’m so pleased to bring you another installment of Eric’s wonderful writing on his Primate Diaries in Exile blog tour.  Following the recent PepsiGate scandal at SEED Science Blogs Eric has taken his show on the road…and I’m so pleased to be one of his stops along the way!  You can follow other stops on [...]... Read more »

Fox, M., Sear, R., Beise, J., Ragsdale, G., Voland, E., & Knapp, L. (2009) Grandma plays favourites: X-chromosome relatedness and sex-specific childhood mortality. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 277(1681), 567-573. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2009.1660  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 11:27 AM
  • 1,822 views

Unmasking Eoanthropus dawsoni, The First Englishman

by Krystal D'Costa in Anthropology in Practice

Fellow blogger and Scientope Scicurious played host to the most recent edition of The Giant’s Shoulders, a blog carnival that recognizes folks who use classic science papers in their writing. Sci put together a spectacular collection of posts based on the theme of Fools, Frauds, and Failures, and it’s certainly worth perusing.
I had high hopes for participating in this round of the carnival, but

... Read more »

MacCurdy, G. (1914) The Man of Piltdown. American Anthropologist, 16(2), 331-336. DOI: 10.1525/aa.1914.16.2.02a00110  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 05:04 AM
  • 1,034 views

The final (?) word on those handaxes from Crete

by Julien Riel-Salvatore in A Very Remote Period Indeed

While everybody was busy talking about unexpectedly old cutmarks and other Pleistocene goings-on last week, the paper by Strasser et al. (2010) describing the discovery of quartz handaxe assemblages on Crete quietly came out in Hesperia. This is a topic that was discussed at length on this blog, in several posts that generated a large amount of comments a few months back. The sticking point of ... Read more »

  • August 17, 2010
  • 08:41 PM
  • 621 views

The Dental Evidence for Agriculture

by teofilo in Gambler's House

I’ve recently been discussing stable isotope analysis as a way to directly determine dietary practices from skeletal evidence, and that is certainly a powerful tool in learning about past societies, but there are some drawbacks to it.  Like all complicated laboratory procedures, it’s expensive, and it has the additional problem of being destructive.  If it’s [...]... Read more »

  • August 17, 2010
  • 05:30 PM
  • 646 views

What The Internet Thinks About Antidepressants

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

Toronto team Rizo et al offer a novel approach to psychopharmacology: trawling the internet for people's opinions. It's a rapid, web-based method for obtaining patient views on effects and side-effects of antidepressants.They designed a script to Google the names of several antidepressants in the context of someone who's taking them, and checks to see if they describe any side-effects.A large number of URLs were rapidly screened through Google Search™, using one server situated in Ohio, USA. T........ Read more »

  • August 17, 2010
  • 04:24 PM
  • 546 views

So What Did the Turkeys Eat?

by teofilo in Gambler's House

As if on cue, given that I’ve been talking about turkey husbandry and stable isotope testing of human remains, a paper in the latest issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science combines the two, using similar stable isotope techniques on turkey remains from sites in southwestern Colorado to determine what the turkeys were eating.  The [...]... Read more »

  • August 16, 2010
  • 11:13 PM
  • 1,875 views

An Anthropological Genetic View of Berkeley’s Personalized Medicine Project

by Kris in Ge·knit·ics

Recently, UC Berkeley announced their “Bring Your Genes to Cal” Project, offering personalized genetic testing for all incoming freshmen. The program allowed incoming students, on a voluntary and anonymous basis, to submit DNA samples, with the promise that they would receive their personal results of tests for three common genetic variants. The program had IRB [...]... Read more »

  • August 16, 2010
  • 08:05 PM
  • 526 views

Basketmaker Subsistence

by teofilo in Gambler's House

One of the important questions in understanding the spread of agriculture into the Southwest from Mexico is when Southwestern peoples became dependent on it for their subsistence.  It is generally accepted that this dependence was in place by the Pueblo I period, which is defined as starting around AD 750 in most areas, but there [...]... Read more »

  • August 16, 2010
  • 05:32 PM
  • 1,318 views

Ape-man the hunter?

by Julien Riel-Salvatore in A Very Remote Period Indeed

Well, at least the butcher, if not the tool-maker... McPherron et al. (2010) report the discovery of four bone fragments bearing marks left by stone tools from the the Dikika-55 locality in Ethiopia (dating to between 3.24-3.42 million years BP), a stone's throw from where the juvenile Australopithecus afarensis dubbed Selam was found. This is a pretty monumental discovery, in that it pushes back the evidence for the use of stone tool technology by about 800,000 years, and associates it fairly c........ Read more »

Semaw S, Renne P, Harris JW, Feibel CS, Bernor RL, Fesseha N, & Mowbray K. (1997) 2.5-million-year-old stone tools from Gona, Ethiopia. Nature, 385(6614), 333-6. PMID: 9002516  

Stout D, Quade J, Semaw S, Rogers MJ, & Levin NE. (2005) Raw material selectivity of the earliest stone toolmakers at Gona, Afar, Ethiopia. Journal of human evolution, 48(4), 365-80. PMID: 15788183  

  • August 16, 2010
  • 08:04 AM
  • 1,243 views

Did Dogs Gain Their Social Intelligence By Accident?

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal

I will be reposting some dog-related posts from the archives in the coming few weeks as I prepare for the course I'm teaching this semester on dog cognition. Please let me know if you find something inaccurate or unclear.

Domesticated dogs seem to have an uncanny ability to understand human communicative gestures (see here). If you point to something the dog zeroes in on the object or location you're pointing to (whether it's a toy, or food, or to get his in-need-of-a-bath butt off your damn be........ Read more »

  • August 13, 2010
  • 06:38 PM
  • 781 views

A Curious Look At The 3.39 Million Year Old “Stone Tool Markings” From Dikika, Ethiopia

by Anthropology.net in Anthropology.net

I don’t know who this is worse for, the editors & reviewers over at Nature or the authors of the article who can’t tell the difference between crocodile teeth markings and stone tool modification, nor raise the possibility. The paper, “Evidence for stone-tool-assisted consumption of animal tissues before 3.39 million years ago at Dikika, Ethiopia,” very [...]... Read more »

  • August 13, 2010
  • 02:56 PM
  • 416 views

More Turkey Stuff

by teofilo in Gambler's House

In looking into recent research on Southwestern turkeys, I found an interesting paper from 2007 by E. Bradley Beacham and Stephen R. Durand about turkey eggshell.  Specifically, they came up with a new technique for analyzing archaeological eggshell to determine whether or not the egg had hatched.  The idea behind it, confirmed by an experiment [...]... Read more »

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