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  • January 16, 2017
  • 12:50 PM
  • 24 views

Five things to consider when designing a policy to measure research impact [Originally published in The Conversation]

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The move of the Australian government to measure the impact of university research on society introduces many new challenges that were not previously relevant when evaluation focused solely on academic merit. … Read More →... Read more »

  • January 11, 2017
  • 05:46 AM
  • 133 views

Two Manifestos for Better Science

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover



Two new papers outline urge scientists to make research more reproducible.



First off, Russ Poldrack and colleagues writing in Nature Reviews Neuroscience discuss how to achieve transparent and reproducible neuroimaging research. Neuroimaging techniques, such as fMRI, are enormously powerful tools for neuroscientists but, Poldrack et al. say, they are at risk of "a ‘perfect storm’ of irreproducible results". because the "high dimensionality of fMRI data, the relatively low power of mos... Read more »

Poldrack RA, Baker CI, Durnez J, Gorgolewski KJ, Matthews PM, Munafò MR, Nichols TE, Poline JB, Vul E, & Yarkoni T. (2017) Scanning the horizon: towards transparent and reproducible neuroimaging research. Nature reviews. Neuroscience. PMID: 28053326  

Marcus R. Munafò, Brian A. Nosek, Dorothy V. M. Bishop, Katherine S. Button,, Christopher D. Chambers, Nathalie Percie du Sert, Uri Simonsohn, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers,, & Jennifer J. Ware and John P. A. Ioannidis. (2017) A manifesto for reproducible science. Nat Hum Behav. info:/

  • January 10, 2017
  • 07:24 AM
  • 125 views

Adoption of open peer review is increasing

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

In analyzing how the 'peer review' institution has emerged and evolved, it is possible to understand the current transition the assessment process is going through towards greater openness, transparency and accountability. … Read More →... Read more »

Csiszar, A. (2016) Peer review: Troubled from the start. Nature, 532(7599), 306-308. DOI: 10.1038/532306a  

Callaway, E. (2016) Open peer review finds more takers. Nature, 539(7629), 343-343. DOI: 10.1038/nature.2016.20969  

  • January 10, 2017
  • 01:49 AM
  • 104 views

Blocking obesity with a protein-sugar combination

by adam phillips in It Ain't Magic

Discovery of an enzyme that prevents obesity in mice through glycosylation of a protein involved fat-cell differentiation.... Read more »

Kaburagi T, Kizuka Y, Kitazume S, & Taniguchi N. (2016) Inhibitory role of α2,6-sialylation in adipogenesis. The Journal of biological chemistry. PMID: 28031460  

  • January 5, 2017
  • 05:21 AM
  • 146 views

How to write a nature-style review

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Nature Reviews Neuroscience is one of the foremost journals in neuroscience. What do its articles look like? How have they developed? This blog post provides answers which might guide you in writing your own reviews. Read more than you used to Reviews in Nature Reviews Neuroscience cover more and more ground. Ten years ago, 93 […]... Read more »

Vale, R. (2015) Accelerating scientific publication in biology. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(44), 13439-13446. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1511912112  

  • January 4, 2017
  • 01:16 PM
  • 163 views

Silage study shows that colostrum can be used with microbiological safety in animal feed

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Researchers at the Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel) in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, showed that anaerobic fermentation process colostrum (Colostrum silage) is able to inhibit the growth of non sporulated pathogenic bacteria. … Read More →... Read more »

Saalfeld, M., Pereira, D., Valente, J., Borchardt, J., Weissheimer, C., Gularte, M., & Leite, F. (2016) Effect of anaerobic bovine colostrum fermentation on bacteria growth inhibition. Ciência Rural, 46(12), 2152-2157. DOI: 10.1590/0103-8478cr20160393  

  • January 3, 2017
  • 03:43 PM
  • 161 views

What Happens to Rejected Papers?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

The pain of rejection is one that every scientist has felt: but what happens to papers after they're declined by a journal?

In a new study, researchers Earnshaw et al. traced the fate of almost 1,000 manuscripts which had been submitted to and rejected by ear, nose and throat journal Clinical Otolaryngology between 2011 to 2013.





To find out if the rejected papers had eventually appeared elsewhere, Earnshaw et al. searched PubMed and Google Scholar for published papers with titles a... Read more »

Earnshaw CH, Edwin C, Bhat J, Krishnan M, Mamais C, Somashekar S, Sunil A, Williams SP, & Leong SC. (2016) An Analysis of the Fate of 917 Manuscripts Rejected from Clinical Otolaryngology. Clinical Otolaryngology. PMID: 28032954  

  • January 3, 2017
  • 02:56 PM
  • 183 views

Provided Examples vs. Generated Examples

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

For learning declarative concepts in a domain and then identifying those concepts in novel real-world situations, provided examples proved to be better than student-generated examples for both long-term learning and for instructional efficiency. The second experiment in the study replicated these findings.... Read more »

  • January 2, 2017
  • 08:31 AM
  • 109 views

Research describes the physiology of Dimorphandra garneriana

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Researchers at the Federal University of Paraíba, in Areia, Paraíba state, Brazil, described the physiology of Dimorphandra garneriana and demonstrated that this forest specie does not tolerate water stress in its initial stages of development. … Read More →... Read more »

Faccin, T., Kommers, G., Galiza, G., Pupin, R., Madureira, R., & Lemos, R. (2016) Chronic liver disease in cattle associated with ingestion of Brachiaria spp. Ciência Rural, 46(11), 2036-2042. DOI: 10.1590/0103-8478cr20160297  

  • December 13, 2016
  • 12:00 PM
  • 45 views

Study points to new chronic form of liver disease associated with ingestion of Brachiaria grasses

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Researchers at the Federal University of Santa Maria in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul State, of Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, in Mato Grosso do Sul state, and the University of Cuiabá, in Mato Grosso state, in Brazil, analyzed cattle livers in a abattoir and found a new form of chronic liver disease probably associated with ingestion of Brachiaria grasses. … Read More →... Read more »

Faccin, T., Kommers, G., Galiza, G., Pupin, R., Madureira, R., & Lemos, R. (2016) Chronic liver disease in cattle associated with ingestion of Brachiaria spp. Ciência Rural, 46(11), 2036-2042. DOI: 10.1590/0103-8478cr20160297  

  • December 9, 2016
  • 10:02 AM
  • 55 views

Research presents favorable results of psychological intervention with women victims of intimate partner violence

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

One of the factors for violence perpetuation is the transmission of coercitive practices through family generations. The Parceria Project (Projeto Parceria) aims at teaching parenting skills to Brazilian women victims of intimate partner violence and shows that it is possible to intervene in order to contribute to the development of healthier family relationships. … Read More →... Read more »

  • December 8, 2016
  • 10:56 AM
  • 281 views

The Reconstruction of Ships: Sailing the Seas of International Collaboration

by Filipe Castro in United Academics

Working for both public and private institutions, archaeologists constantly construct and deconstruct narratives about our past, but traditionally publish only a fraction of the sites they excavate and thus destroy. Computers and the internet present a vast range of opportunities for archaeologists to share primary data and foster intercultural online collaborations and reinterpretations of archaeological contexts. ... Read more »

Bass, G. (1961) The Cape Gelidonya Wreck: Preliminary Report. American Journal of Archaeology, 65(3), 267. DOI: 10.2307/501687  

  • December 8, 2016
  • 09:14 AM
  • 222 views

What are Hierarchical Orthologous Groups (HOGs)?

by Christophe Dessimoz in Open Reading Frame


One central concept in the OMA project and other
work we do to infer relationships between genes is that of Hierarchical
Orthologous Groups, or “HOGs” for the initiated.

We’ve written several papers on aspects pertaining to HOGs—how to infer
them,
how to evaluate them, they being
increasingly adopted by orthology
resources, etc.—but there is
still a great deal of confusion as to what HOGs are and why they matter.

Natasha Glover, talented postdoc in the lab,........ Read more »

Sonnhammer, E., Gabaldon, T., Sousa da Silva, A., Martin, M., Robinson-Rechavi, M., Boeckmann, B., Thomas, P., Dessimoz, C., & , . (2014) Big data and other challenges in the quest for orthologs. Bioinformatics, 30(21), 2993-2998. DOI: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btu492  

  • December 7, 2016
  • 02:15 PM
  • 41 views

Diagnosis of congenital malformations during the pregnancy is a difficult theme for families and professionals, and can affects the mental health of pregnant women

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

Research considers that the diagnosis of congenital malformation may affect maternal mental health during pregnancy. Symptoms of anxiety and depression can occur from the first quarter, impacting also on the family, especially if the communication of the diagnosis is not careful. They conclude that the coping face to this situation and the impact of bad news can be minimized by the pregnant woman's support network. … Read More →... Read more »

  • December 6, 2016
  • 08:46 AM
  • 215 views

Are American Professors More Responsive to Requests Made by White Male Students?

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

The vast majority of professors will gladly meet a prospective graduate student and discuss research opportunities as well as long-term career options, especially if the student requesting the meeting clarifies the goal of the meeting. However, there are cases when students wait in vain for a response. Is it because their email never reached the professor because it got lost in the internet ether or a spam folder? Was the professor simply too busy to respond? A research study headed by Katherine........ Read more »

  • November 30, 2016
  • 01:41 PM
  • 309 views

Open and Post Peer Review: New Trends in Open Access Publications

by Nesru Koroso in United Academics

Among the academic community, there a growing feeling that traditional peer review is failing at accomplishing its core objective: ensuring scientific quality.... Read more »

  • November 29, 2016
  • 01:36 PM
  • 211 views

Open Access article processing charges: a new serial publication crisis?

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The financial and ethical implications that emerge from open access publishing through article processing fees in India are analyzed in a study that proposes the creation of a national open access journal platform such as SciELO in order to reduce costs, increase efficiency and facilitate the sharing of metadata among repositories. … Read More →... Read more »

  • November 21, 2016
  • 11:55 AM
  • 283 views

How did Gall Identify his 27 Faculties?

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic





Franz Joseph Gall (1758-1828), a founding father of phrenology


Phrenology was the pseudoscience of identifying a person's character and mental abilities on the basis of skull morphology (“bumps on the head”). The enterprise was based on four assumptions (Gross, 2009):

intellectual abilities and personality traits are differentially developed in each individual
these abilities and traits

... Read more »

  • November 10, 2016
  • 04:09 PM
  • 295 views

Am I An Unethical Pseudonym?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

I've blogged about my fair share of scientific papers over the years, but this is a new one: a paper about me.



Writing in Science and Engineering Ethics, author Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva discusses the question of Are Pseudonyms Ethical in (Science) Publishing? Neuroskeptic as a Case Study



Teixeira da Silva, a plant scientist and frequent poster on PubPeer amongst other forums, opens with the following:
There is a prominent blogger called Neuroskeptic who has a web-site and even a... Read more »

  • November 4, 2016
  • 09:13 AM
  • 293 views

Study shows that articles published in English attract more citations

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Among the many factors that influence citation practice in scholarly communication, the language of publication plays a key role. A study by Argentine researchers showed that English articles receive more citations than those published in other languages. Despite being perceived by many as of lower quality and relevance, articles in Spanish from two Latin American journals were blind evaluated and were not, in fact, underqualified. … Read More →... Read more »

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