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  • October 25, 2014
  • 11:30 PM
  • 71 views

Stem cells, branching processes and stochasticity in cancer

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

When you were born, you probably had 270 bones in your body. Unless you’ve experienced some very drastic traumas, and assuming that you are fully grown, then you probably have 206 bones now. Much like the number and types of internal organs, we can call this question of science solved. Unfortunately, it isn’t always helpful […]... Read more »

  • October 20, 2014
  • 12:12 PM
  • 88 views

How a camera and quantum physics could improve phone security

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

New study uses mobile phone camera to detect light, using shot noise to generate true random numbers which researchers hope could be used for encryption in the future.... Read more »

Sanguinetti, B., Martin, A., Zbinden, H., & Gisin, N. (2014) Quantum Random Number Generation on a Mobile Phone. Physical Review X, 4(3). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.031056  

  • October 18, 2014
  • 09:34 AM
  • 109 views

Merit’s Liquidity

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

The latest SAT and ACT data suggest that America’s cognitive elite have been enjoying new geographic mobility, but difficult economic times push them out of the elite strata, contrary to a prediction of The Bell Curve by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray.... Read more »

nooffensebut. (2014) Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score. Open Differential Psychology, 1-19. info:other/

  • September 27, 2014
  • 01:29 PM
  • 207 views

Are Black Holes just in Our Imagination?!

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Black holes, physicists have been fighting over them forever, heck there is even a book entitled the black hole war! (which I do recommend for anyone interested) It’s no real surprise since they are the ultimate unknown – the blackest and most dense objects in the universe that do not even let light escape. And as if they weren't bizarre enough to begin with, now add this to the mix: they don’t exist.... Read more »

Laura Mersini-Houghton, Harald P. Pfeiffer. (2014) Back-reaction of the Hawking radiation flux on a gravitationally collapsing star II: Fireworks instead of firewalls . Physics Letters B. info:/arXiv:1409.1837

  • September 26, 2014
  • 10:30 AM
  • 186 views

Walking Really Is Just Falling and Catching Yourself

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

The flailing of a gymnast who’s missed a step on the balance beam might not be far off from what the rest of us experience every day. Each step we take is really a tiny fall, a mathematical model suggests. The random-looking variation in our footfalls is actually a series of corrections. Our strides are […]The post Walking Really Is Just Falling and Catching Yourself appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • September 21, 2014
  • 04:40 PM
  • 139 views

DICE 2014

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

I have spent this week in Castiglioncello participating to the Conference DICE 2014. This Conference is organized with a cadence of two years with the main efforts due to Thomas Elze. I have been a participant to the 2006 edition where I gave a talk about decoherence and thermodynamic limit (see here and here). This […]... Read more »

Marco Frasca. (2006) Thermodynamic Limit and Decoherence: Rigorous Results. Journal of Physics: Conference Series 67 (2007) 012026. arXiv: quant-ph/0611024v1

Ali H. Chamseddine, Alain Connes, & Viatcheslav Mukhanov. (2014) Quanta of Geometry. arXiv. arXiv: 1409.2471v3

  • September 11, 2014
  • 11:00 PM
  • 191 views

Transcendental idealism and Post’s variant of the Church-Turing thesis

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

One of the exciting things in reading philosophy, its history in particular, is experiencing the tension between different schools of thought. This excitement turns to beauty if a clear synthesis emerges to reconcile the conflicting ideas. In the middle to late 18th century, as the Age of Enlightenment was giving way to the Romantic era, […]... Read more »

Post, E.L. (1936) Finite combinatory processes -- formulation 1. Journal of Symbolic Logic, 1(3), 103-105. info:/

  • September 8, 2014
  • 01:17 PM
  • 150 views

Fingertips can actually perform calculations

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Nerve endings on our fingertips have the same ability of performing complex neural computations as we can find in our brain.

Published in:

Nature Nanotechnology

Study Further:

Researchers have found that our fingertips are able to differentiate the edges and this process of getting knowledge of orientation of edges is performed by both touch and visual senses. Most of these senses and computations occur in the brain as it contains cells of both touch and see that are s........ Read more »

  • September 2, 2014
  • 10:41 AM
  • 175 views

Pigeon Gamblers Treat Risk Just Like Humans Do

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

If you watch poker coverage on television, you probably won’t hear the commentators compare players to pigeons. Maybe they should. The birds don’t play a great game of hold ‘em, but the way they think about risk might be strikingly similar to the way we do. Researchers discovered this by putting humans and birds through […]The post Pigeon Gamblers Treat Risk Just Like Humans Do appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

Ludvig EA, Madan CR, Pisklak JM, & Spetch ML. (2014) Reward context determines risky choice in pigeons and humans. Biology letters, 10(8). PMID: 25165453  

  • September 1, 2014
  • 11:15 PM
  • 190 views

Falsifiability and Gandy’s variant of the Church-Turing thesis

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

In 1936, two years after Karl Popper published the first German version of The Logic of Scientific Discovery and introduced falsifiability; Alonzo Church, Alan Turing, and Emil Post each published independent papers on the Entscheidungsproblem and introducing the lambda calculus, Turing machines, and Post-Turing machines as mathematical models of computation. The years after saw many […]... Read more »

Gandy, R. (1980) Church's thesis and principles for mechanisms. Studies in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics, 123-148. DOI: 10.1016/S0049-237X(08)71257-6  

  • August 31, 2014
  • 06:36 PM
  • 199 views

Whitman Was Not a Neuroscientist

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Do I contradict myself?Very well then I contradict myself,(I am large, I contain multitudes.)-Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself" (from Leaves of Grass)Science is the search for objective truth based on physical laws of the universe. Scientific theories try to explain the consistent and predictable behavior of natural systems. They are generally reductionist, meaning that complex systems are reduced to simpler and more fundamental elements. The principles of physics, for instance, are expressed in th........ Read more »

  • August 29, 2014
  • 09:25 AM
  • 217 views

The Friday Five for 8/29/14

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

5 of the hottest science news stories this week include a lab-grown thymus, big Alzheimer’s news, and how to make the perfect pizza.... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 01:27 PM
  • 257 views

The Holographic Universe [we might Live in!]

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Are you feeling a little… flat? Well that might be because you are only in 2 dimensions. I know what you’re thinking, insane! Well first check the name of the business and second, check out the science. In fact, it may seem like a joke, but the math suggests that it could very well be true and with it could come a deeper understanding of the universe. Testing this hypothesis (which was first made in the late 90’s) has been harder to do than you might think, but that has now changed. We are........ Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 04:39 AM
  • 254 views

Brian Hooker's Hooked Hoax: Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) Vaccination and Autism Spectrum Disorder

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

10 years after the initial study by DeStefano et al. (2004) was conducted, famous anti-vaccine alarmist Brian Hooker, along with Andrew Wakefield, are talking about a "whistleblower" in the CDC claiming that the original data was fraudulent, and was masking a 336% increased risk in ASD in African American boys receiving the MMR vaccine "on time." Did Hooker prove anything in his new study, however? Only that he doesn't understand epidemiology or statistics.... Read more »

  • August 22, 2014
  • 11:15 PM
  • 199 views

Global Warming Denial: Common Arguments and Misconceptions

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

An informal collection of common arguments and misconceptions by global warming denialists, as well as my rebuttals. Uses relevant data from IPCC, NOAA, NASA and peer-reviewed literature. Its purpose serves to inform the general public about these false claims so that we can escape this bout with pseudoscience a bit faster.... Read more »

Mann, M., Zhang, Z., Rutherford, S., Bradley, R., Hughes, M., Shindell, D., Ammann, C., Faluvegi, G., & Ni, F. (2009) Global Signatures and Dynamical Origins of the Little Ice Age and Medieval Climate Anomaly. Science, 326(5957), 1256-1260. DOI: 10.1126/science.1177303  

  • August 14, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 245 views

Competition for ecological niches limits evolution of new species | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

A recently published study finds that competition for ecological niches limits the evolution of new species. Further, this study finds that speciation rate slows or even stops as available ecological niches fill up. Continue reading...... Read more »

Price Trevor D., Hooper Daniel M., Buchanan Caitlyn D., Johansson Ulf S., Tietze D. Thomas, Alström Per, Olsson Urban, Ghosh-Harihar Mousumi, Ishtiaq Farah, & Gupta Sandeep K. (2014) Niche filling slows the diversification of Himalayan songbirds. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature13272  

Kennedy Jonathan D., Weir Jason T., Hooper Daniel M. , Tietze D. Thomas, Martens Jochen, & Price Trevor D. (2012) Ecological limits on diversification of the Himalayan core Corvoidea. Evolution, 66(8), 2599-2613. DOI: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01618.x  

Harmon Luke J., Schulte James A., Larson Allan, & Losos Jonathan B. (2003) Tempo and Mode of Evolutionary Radiation in Iguanian Lizards. Science, 301(5635), 961-964. DOI: 10.1126/science.1084786  

  • July 22, 2014
  • 01:19 PM
  • 288 views

Optical Cables, from Thin Air!

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

It’s a project that would make Tesla proud. Just imagine being able to instantaneously run an optical cable or fiber to any point on earth, or even into space. That’s what researchers are trying to do. Did I mention it was instantaneous and involved no connection other than the air around us? Well if you are as excited as I am, then you should read on! If not, two words, laser weapons!!... Read more »

Rosenthal, E., Jhajj, N., Wahlstrand, J., & Milchberg, H. (2014) Collection of remote optical signals by air waveguides. Optica, 1(1), 5. DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.1.000005  

Jhajj, N., Rosenthal, E., Birnbaum, R., Wahlstrand, J., & Milchberg, H. (2014) Demonstration of Long-Lived High-Power Optical Waveguides in Air. Physical Review X, 4(1). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.011027  

  • July 14, 2014
  • 02:48 PM
  • 267 views

Can We Grasp The Brain’s Complexity?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

An entertaining paper just out in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience offers a panoramic view of the whole of neuroscience: Enlarging the scope: grasping brain complexity The paper is remarkable not just for its content but also for its style. Some examples: How does the brain work? This nagging question is an habitué from the top […]The post Can We Grasp The Brain’s Complexity? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Tognoli E, & Kelso JA. (2014) Enlarging the scope: grasping brain complexity. Frontiers in systems neuroscience, 122. PMID: 25009476  

  • July 4, 2014
  • 10:48 AM
  • 344 views

Parents’ Income Poorly Predicts SAT Score

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

Here I publish my original study that disproves family income as an important influence on SAT scores, shows race as having its greatest influence on scores at the highest education and income levels, and provides some preliminary evidence for a hereditary influence.... Read more »

nooffensebut. (2014) Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score. Open Differential Psychology, 1-19. info:other/

Bartels M, Rietveld MJ, Van Baal GC, & Boomsma DI. (2002) Heritability of educational achievement in 12-year-olds and the overlap with cognitive ability. Twin research : the official journal of the International Society for Twin Studies, 5(6), 544-53. PMID: 12573186  

Duckworth AL, Quinn PD, Lynam DR, Loeber R, & Stouthamer-Loeber M. (2011) Role of test motivation in intelligence testing. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108(19), 7716-20. PMID: 21518867  

Duncan, J., Seitz, R.J., Kolodny, J., Bor, D., Herzog, H., Ahmed, A., Newell, F.N., & Emslie, H. (2000) A Neural Basis for General Intelligence. Science, 289(5478), 457-460. DOI: 10.1126/science.289.5478.457  

MacCallum RC, Wegener DT, Uchino BN, & Fabrigar LR. (1993) The problem of equivalent models in applications of covariance structure analysis. Psychological bulletin, 114(1), 185-99. PMID: 8346326  

Marioni RE, Davies G, Hayward C, Liewald D, Kerr SM, Campbell A, Luciano M, Smith BH, Padmanabhan S, Hocking LJ.... (2014) Molecular genetic contributions to socioeconomic status and intelligence. Intelligence, 44(100), 26-32. PMID: 24944428  

Trzaskowski M, Harlaar N, Arden R, Krapohl E, Rimfeld K, McMillan A, Dale PS, & Plomin R. (2014) Genetic influence on family socioeconomic status and children's intelligence. Intelligence, 42(100), 83-88. PMID: 24489417  

  • June 28, 2014
  • 11:19 PM
  • 317 views

Predicting the Flu

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Using search engines to predict the future of infectious diseases: computer science meets epidemiology.... Read more »

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