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  • May 11, 2017
  • 09:42 PM
  • 154 views

The banal nationalism of intercultural communication advice

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Intercultural communication advice is a strange genre. Filling shelves and shelves in bookshops and libraries and now with a well-established...... Read more »

Piller, I. (2017) Intercultural Communication: A Critical Introduction (2nd ed.). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. info:/

  • April 25, 2017
  • 02:16 AM
  • 234 views

Will technology make language rights obsolete?

by Dave Sayers in Language on the Move

Something has been nagging at me recently. I read a lot of tech news, and it seems automated translation is...... Read more »

  • April 9, 2017
  • 10:51 PM
  • 276 views

Fighting for ‘pure’ Mongolian

by Gegentuul Baioud in Language on the Move

On New Year’s Eve, when many people around the world were excited about firework shows, a group of Mongols in...... Read more »

Sachirengui. (2013) Mongol nüüdel hüühediin niigemchileltiin tuhai sudalal [A Study on the Socialization Process of Mongol Migrant Children in Hohhot]. Masters thesis, University of Inner Mongolia, Hohhot. . info:/

  • March 14, 2017
  • 08:26 PM
  • 309 views

‘I’m not listening to you!’ Interacting in a linguistically diverse society

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

On December 23, 2016, as most Australians were winding down for the holiday week ahead, Faysal Ishak Ahmed, a 27-year-old...... Read more »

Kenison TC, Madu A, Krupat E, Ticona L, Vargas IM, & Green AR. (2017) Through the Veil of Language: Exploring the Hidden Curriculum for the Care of Patients With Limited English Proficiency. Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 92(1), 92-100. PMID: 27166864  

  • February 27, 2017
  • 04:39 AM
  • 301 views

The First Family of Chaco

by teofilo in Gambler's House

A fascinating and important article about Chaco was published last week in Nature Communications, an open-access offshoot of the venerable journal Nature (already a good sign). Since it’s open-access, the full text of the article is available free online here. The researchers behind the article, based mainly at Penn State and Harvard but also including […]... Read more »

Kennett, D., Plog, S., George, R., Culleton, B., Watson, A., Skoglund, P., Rohland, N., Mallick, S., Stewardson, K., Kistler, L.... (2017) Archaeogenomic evidence reveals prehistoric matrilineal dynasty. Nature Communications, 14115. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14115  

  • January 26, 2017
  • 06:00 AM
  • 284 views

Mesa Verde’s Sun Temple Reveals Geometrical ‘Genius,’ Physicist Says

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

An 800-year-old ceremonial complex near the famous cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde was built using the same basic geometry found in ancient monuments from Greece to Egypt, a new study has found.

... Read more »

Sherry Towers. (2016) Advanced geometrical constructs in a Pueblo ceremonial site, c 1200 CE. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. arXiv: 1605.09494v2

  • January 16, 2017
  • 06:00 AM
  • 218 views

Bones in Yukon Cave Show Humans in North America 24,000 Years Ago, Study Says

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

A close look at bones found in a Yukon cave seems to confirm a controversial finding made decades ago, archaeologists say: that humans arrived in North America 10,000 years earlier than many experts believe.

... Read more »

  • January 15, 2017
  • 07:04 AM
  • 450 views

What Differential-K Theory gets Wrong about Race Differences in Sexuality

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

This post critiques a study that attempted to test predictions of differential-K theory about racial differences in sexuality using data from a Durex condom survey. Better, more scientific data addresses this topic, and fails to confirm the predictions of this theory.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • January 15, 2017
  • 06:05 AM
  • 436 views

Population Differences in Androgens Fail to Validate Richard Lynn's Claims about Racial Differences in Penis Size

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

The author of a study on population differences in androgens claimed that his findings support Lynn's claims about racial differences in penis length. Close analysis of the statistics used shows these conclusions are invalid.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • January 3, 2017
  • 06:00 AM
  • 240 views

How Did People of Chaco Canyon Grow Their Food? Expert Says, They Didn’t

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

Recently, researchers have been at odds over a simple, central question in Southwestern history: How did the people of Chaco Canyon manage to grow food in such an arid environment?

... Read more »

  • December 31, 2016
  • 07:13 AM
  • 484 views

Population Differences in Androgens Fail to Support Differential-K Theory

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

A recent paper attempts to test predictions of Differential-K Theory about race differences using data on population differences in androgens.Close examination of this data shows that the predictions fail.... Read more »

Dutton, E., van der Linden, D., & Lynn, R. (2016) Population differences in androgen levels: A test of the Differential K theory. Personality and Individual Differences, 289-295. info:/

  • December 23, 2016
  • 01:47 PM
  • 576 views

What Scientists Think About Scientists

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Most people believe that scientists have high levels of objectivity and integrity - and scientists themselves share these positive views of their own profession. But according to scientists, not all researchers are equally upstanding, with male and early-career scientists being seen as somewhat less trustworthy than others.



That's according to a new paper from Dutch researchers Coosje Veldkamp et al.: Who Believes in the Storybook Image of the Scientist?

Based on a series of studies in... Read more »

Veldkamp CL, Hartgerink CH, van Assen MA, & Wicherts JM. (2016) Who Believes in the Storybook Image of the Scientist?. Accountability in research. PMID: 28001440  

  • December 19, 2016
  • 04:52 AM
  • 635 views

Neuroscience Spots Potential Criminals In Pre-School?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A new post at Quartz discusses
The disturbingly accurate brain science that identifies potential criminals while they’re still toddlers... scientists are able to use brain tests on three-year-olds to determine which children are more likely to grow up to become criminals.


Hmmm. Not really.

The research in question is from from North Carolina researchers Avshalom Caspi et al.: Childhood forecasting of a small segment of the population with large economic burden. It's based on a long-term... Read more »

Caspi, A., Houts, R., Belsky, D., Harrington, H., Hogan, S., Ramrakha, S., Poulton, R., & Moffitt, T. (2016) Childhood forecasting of a small segment of the population with large economic burden. Nature Human Behaviour, 5. DOI: 10.1038/s41562-016-0005  

  • December 7, 2016
  • 01:21 PM
  • 489 views

The Hunt for the Higgs Bison Is Over

by Jeffrey Daniels in United Academics

A recently-published study has now resolved the mystery of the bison bones, with the help of some Ice Age cave artists. It turns out that there once existed, during the Ice Age, a hybrid between the now-extinct aurochs (the beast from which we domesticated the cow) and the equally-extinct steppe bison (basically, the Asian version of the American bison).... Read more »

  • November 23, 2016
  • 05:24 PM
  • 543 views

Interpreting English language ideologies in Korea: dreams vs. realities

by Lg_on_the_move in Language on the Move

Many people around the world dream of learning English. The pursuit of English is rarely only, or even predominantly, about language learning: it’s...... Read more »

  • November 18, 2016
  • 11:00 AM
  • 676 views

Imagine: Listening to Songs Which Make Us More Generous

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

It does not come as a surprise that background music in a café helps create the ambience and affects how much customers enjoy sipping their cappuccinos. But recent research suggests that the choice of lyrics can even impact the social behavior of customers. The researcher Nicolas Ruth and his colleagues from the University of Würzburg (Bavaria, Germany) assembled a playlist of 18 songs with pro-social lyrics which they had curated by surveying 74 participants in an online questionnaire as to w........ Read more »

  • November 18, 2016
  • 08:31 AM
  • 747 views

Is anybody out there? Talking to the Galactic Zookeepers

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

The Zoo Hypothesis Hello? Anybody out there in the starry skies? If there are extra-terrestrial civilizations, why haven’t we heard from them yet? The sheer magnitude of the universe with its billions upon billions of stars has led many to suggest that life must have arisen more than once in the cosmos. Some have gone […]... Read more »

  • November 10, 2016
  • 04:29 AM
  • 563 views

Building bridges in a divided world

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

As I am trying to finalize the manuscript for the second revised edition of my 2011 book Intercultural Communication: A...... Read more »

Markus, A. (2016) Australians Today: The Australia@2015 Scanlon Foundation Survey. Scanlon Foundation. info:/

  • November 3, 2016
  • 11:10 PM
  • 608 views

Stereotyped ethnic names as a barrier to workplace entry

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Who of the three women in this image do you think German employers are most likely to consider as a...... Read more »

  • October 31, 2016
  • 02:03 AM
  • 546 views

Room 33 Revisited

by teofilo in Gambler's House

In my post about the recent radiocarbon dating of macaw remains from Chaco Canyon, I mentioned another paper I’ve been meaning to post about. Published in 2010 by Steve Plog and Carrie Heitman of the University of Virginia, it takes a close look at burial practices at Chaco, particularly focusing on the northern burial cluster […]... Read more »

Plog, S., & Heitman, C. (2010) Hierarchy and social inequality in the American Southwest, A.D. 800-1200. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(46), 19619-19626. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1014985107  

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