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  • October 31, 2014
  • 04:05 PM
  • 3 views

New Genetic Editing Technique Offers Novel Treatment of Defects

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

The promises of genetic modifications are endless, longer life, better health, cures for genetic based diseases that would otherwise cause an unimaginable amount of suffering all wiped out. We’ve come a long way in genetic alteration thanks, in part, to the ever faster moving pace of science. While genetic modification is the thing of horror movies, it also can change the world in ways we cannot even imagine — unfortunately getting genome-editing proteins into cells, where they need to be t........ Read more »

  • October 31, 2014
  • 12:05 PM
  • 13 views

I Need How Many Calories? Caloric Needs in Bulimia Nervosa Patients

by Tetyana in Science of Eating Disorders


In the 1980s, a few studies came out suggesting that patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) require fewer calories for weight maintenance than anorexia nervosa patients (e.g., Newman, Halmi, & Marchi, 1987) and healthy female controls (e.g., Gwirtsman et al., 1989).
Gwirtsman et al. (1989), after finding that patients with bulimia nervosa required few calories for weight maintenance than healthy volunteers, had these suggestions for clinicians:
When bulimic patient........ Read more »

de Zwaan, M., Aslam, Z., & Mitchell, J.E. (2002) Research on energy expenditure in individuals with eating disorders: a review. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 31(4), 361-9. PMID: 11948641  

Gwirtsman, H.E., Kaye, W.H., Obarzanek, E., George, D.T., Jimerson, D.C., & Ebert, M.H. (1989) Decreased caloric intake in normal-weight patients with bulimia: comparison with female volunteers. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 49(1), 86-92. PMID: 2912015  

  • October 31, 2014
  • 11:48 AM
  • 11 views

Halloween Special: The Drosophila Halloween Genes

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

In the movies, spooks and phantoms are often undead humans with unfinished business. But would you be afraid of a ghostly fruit fly? In 1995, fruit fly researchers Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric Wieschaus were awarded a Nobel Prize for their research on development. They were interested in understanding how a fertilized egg develops into a complex […]... Read more »

  • October 31, 2014
  • 11:44 AM
  • 12 views

Tissue-specific genome editing in Ciona embryos by CRISPR/Cas9

by Shashank Gandhi in the Node

Researchers have always been interested in tissue-specific loss of function to probe the role of specific genes in embryonic development, cell physiology and disease conditions. Migration of lateral plate primordial germ cells in zebrafish, border cell migration during oogenesis in drosophila, interaction of T-cells with their target, and numerous other cases have continued to give […]... Read more »

Stolfi, A., Gandhi, S., Salek, F., & Christiaen, L. (2014) Tissue-specific genome editing in Ciona embryos by CRISPR/Cas9. Development, 141(21), 4115-4120. DOI: 10.1242/dev.114488  

  • October 31, 2014
  • 11:15 AM
  • 15 views

Canonical circuits in neuroscience

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Gary Marcus, Adam Marblestone, and Thomas Dean have a nice perspective piece in Science this week on the atoms of neural computation (gated): One hypothesis is that cortical neurons form a single, massively repeated “canonical” circuit, characterized as a kind of a … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 31, 2014
  • 11:14 AM
  • 14 views

NS1: It’s all about location, location, location

by Clay Clark in Biochem Blogs

  Viruses are minimalists when it comes to genomic data. This light packing of genetic information requires that every protein the virus codes for needs to be as versatile as possible. The flavivirus genus is no exception to this; its genome encodes for three structural proteins (capsid, membrane, and envelope) and seven nonstructural proteins (NS1, […]... Read more »

  • October 31, 2014
  • 06:37 AM
  • 17 views

Mind Blowing Brain Cases: The Man With A Hole In His Head

by Elisabeth Buhl Thubron in United Academics

In this series neuroscientist Elisabeth Buhl Thubron takes a closer look at intriguing brain cases that revolutionised the field. Part I: The Man With A Whole In His Head... Read more »

Harlow JM. (1999) Passage of an iron rod through the head. 1848. The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences, 11(2), 281-3. PMID: 10334003  

Ratiu P, Talos IF, Haker S, Lieberman D, & Everett P. (2004) The tale of Phineas Gage, digitally remastered. Journal of neurotrauma, 21(5), 637-43. PMID: 15165371  

Van Horn JD, Irimia A, Torgerson CM, Chambers MC, Kikinis R, & Toga AW. (2012) Mapping connectivity damage in the case of Phineas Gage. PloS one, 7(5). PMID: 22616011  

  • October 31, 2014
  • 06:22 AM
  • 14 views

TSC1 is required for iNKT cell maturation and function

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cell development is highly regulated, starting at stage 0, where DP thermocytes become committed to the iNKT cell lineage, and ending as fully mature stage 3 iNKT cells, which are capable of illiciting an immune … Continue reading →... Read more »

Wu J, Yang J, Yang K, Wang H, Gorentla B, Shin J, Qiu Y, Que LG, Foster WM, Xia Z.... (2014) iNKT cells require TSC1 for terminal maturation and effector lineage fate decisions. The Journal of clinical investigation, 124(4), 1685-98. PMID: 24614103  

  • October 31, 2014
  • 05:06 AM
  • 19 views

Caesarean section births and autism risk?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

It was a familiar story. Big media headlines such as: Caesarean sections 'may increase risk of autism' appearing all over, but when it came to finding the study behind the headlines, the publishing journal seemed to be trailing a little way behind. We've been in a similar situation before."As the flames rose to her Roman nose"Anyhow, the paper by Eileen Curran and colleagues [1] (open-access) has finally made it to the research table and hence is fodder for today's ramblings with the sugges........ Read more »

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